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aries1988 : insect   4

When Twenty-Six Thousand Stinkbugs Invade Your Home
The brown marmorated stinkbug often congregates indoors in exorbitant numbers. Illustration by David Plunkert Audio: Listen to this story. To hear more feature…
insect  nightmare  chinese  home  biology 
march 2018 by aries1988
The red and green specialists: why human colour vision is so odd | Aeon Ideas
Most mammals rely on scent rather than sight. Look at a dog’s eyes, for example: they’re usually on the sides of its face, not close together and forward-facing like ours. Having eyes on the side is good for creating a broad field of vision, but b...
comparison  human  eye  color  perception  biology  insect  evolution  research  theory 
february 2018 by aries1988
Do animals fight wars and if so what was the largest war?

In New Orleans, something changed. L. humile, invading the United States, spread like wildfire. Instead of forming discrete, competing colonies, they behaved as a united army. They would brutally attack ants of other species, but welcome every L. humile as a long-lost sister in arms.
story  animal  world  war  biology  insect 
august 2016 by aries1988
From Pokémon Red to Pokémon Go, How Nintendo's Video Game Franchise Captured the Experience of Leaving Home - The Atlantic
The original Pokémon (first released for the Game Boy in 1996) is a bildungsroman, or coming-of-age-story, disguised as a bug-collecting challenge.

It works because it captures the original game’s spirit of exploration, even if its players said goodbye to their childhood home years ago.

The way Tajiri describes his childhood in that interview alludes to the game’s bildungsroman quality, that of a child learning about the world around him by physically grappling with it. “If I put my hand in the river, I would get a crayfish. If there was a stick over a hole, it would create an air bubble and I'd find insects there,” he said. “In Japan, a lot of kids like to go out and catch beetles by putting honey on a piece of tree bark. My idea was to put a stone under a tree, because they slept during the day and like sleeping under stones. So in the morning I'd go pick up the stone and find them. Tiny discoveries like that made me excited.”

it’s still managed to turn its fans into a nation of Dr. Bugs, even if we aren’t turning over stones or baiting trees with honey. At its best, it can evoke a little wonder in the mundane world around us—or force us to realize the world we live in was never mundane in the first place.
game  children  iOS  animal  insect  discovery  nature  nostalgia  city  essay  neighborhood 
july 2016 by aries1988

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