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aries1988 : investigation   6

La consommation de charcuterie nuit gravement à la santé

Selon les conclusions du CIRC, rappelle-t-il, le risque de cancer colorectal est accru de 18 % pour une consommation de seulement 50 grammes de viandes transformées par jour – soit à peine deux fines tranches de jambon. Et encore ne s’agit-il là que d’un seul type de cancer, celui qui est le plus étudié en relation avec la consommation de produits carnés transformés…

La toxicité des sels nitrés (à base de nitrate ou de nitrite) est connue depuis plus d’un siècle et la cancérogénicité de certains d’entre eux, depuis plus de 50 ans. Ce qui n’empêche nullement les charcutiers industriels d’en ajouter à la grande majorité de leurs produits.
book  français  food  industry  porc  health  investigation 
november 2017 by aries1988
Why Singapore’s kids are so good at maths

Aiming to move away from simple rote-learning and to focus instead on teaching children how to problem solve, the textbooks the group produced were influenced by educational psychologists such as the American Jerome Bruner, who posited that people learn in three stages: by using real objects, then pictures, and then through symbols. That theory contributed to Singapore’s strong emphasis on modelling mathematical problems with visual aids; using coloured blocks to represent fractions or ratios, for example.

A switch from an ability-based model of individualised learning, to a model [which says that] all children are capable of anything, depending on how it is presented to them and the effort which they put into learning it.

unlike Singapore’s office buildings, which are so deeply chilled by air conditioning that workers regularly wrap themselves in sweaters, the classrooms are open to the tropical humidity. Ceiling fans stir the air and the chatter of other children sometimes drifts through the open windows.

Meritocracy is an element of the glue that binds Singapore together. Alongside the promise of shared prosperity and security, the idea that the brightest can rise to the top is a component of the political bargain that the city-state has struck with its citizens, under which some political freedoms are restricted in exchange for significant material benefits.

Singaporeans frequently use the Hokkien Chinese word kiasu to describe themselves. The term translates as being afraid to lose out
investigation  interview  singapore  asia  education  children  learn  methodology  comparison  uk  crisis  world  future  creativity  debate  society  history  reportage 
july 2016 by aries1988

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