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A Virtual-Reality Program to Conquer the Fear of Public Speaking | The New Yorker

Glossophobia, the fear of public speaking

He showed me how to use the program to teleport across cavernous halls and land inches away from strangers, where I could admire rogue gray hairs on their heads and fine webs of wrinkles on their slacks. I was drawn to a woman sitting in a middle row of a banquet-hall audience. She appeared to be miserably bored, as if waiting for a train that would never arrive. She had dun-colored hair, worn in a bun that did not suit her. I reached out to touch it. She blinked, and my hands disappeared from view, sinking into the depth of her head. I backed off and marvelled at the sight of my alternate self’s hands, which were covered with barely detectable freckles and hair follicles. Marshall helped me adjust the size to more closely resemble my own.

I styled everyone in the program in casual, just-stopping-by-the-bookstore clothing, adjusted the gender ratio to include more women, and set the audience rudeness level as high as I could. Now everyone assembled was checking their phones, crossing their arms, or yawning theatrically. I spotted kindness on only one face. Ned, as I decided to call him, was a balding man in a gray cardigan. His hopeful eyebrows told me that he’d been through a lot.

Even though I knew that I was alone in my kitchen, in the middle of the day, and that Ned and his rude friends were illusory, my nerves kept tripping me up. A man who was seated near me at a conference table picked at some lint on his trousers, and I lost my footing and had to start the recording over. Again and again, I recited my spiel over a soundtrack of coughing and an occasional unsilenced mobile device. When I made it all the way to the end of my remarks, the crowd granted me a lackluster round of applause.

Thanks to a real-time “heat map” that tracks a user’s visual attention, I could plainly see that my gaze favors the left side of the room. I watched the words “very” and “so” rise faithfully from my mouth like bubbles.

My avatar—who had my round face and slumped posture—appeared during the playbacks. From my position at the edge of the imaginary room, all I could do was watch her ape my body movements and listen to the recording of my speech. The program designates a grade at the end of each playback, factoring in gaze distribution, pace, pauses, reliance on filler words, and hand activity. Five days in, my scores still hovered around seventy per cent. (My dead-fish hands earned consistent fourteens.)

But, in the group settings, Ned was always somewhere to be found, soothing me with a look of compassionate distress.

While the other authors spoke, I located a young woman whose wide eyes and bobbing head suggested a sympathetic soul—a new, real-life Ned. When it was my turn to speak, I focussed on her and stepped into the light.
temoignage  fun  speaking  public  stress  vr  tool  simulation  social  technique  practice  howto  idea  entrepreneurial 
may 2019 by aries1988
OpenFOAM/C++代码风格规范
普适性准则 每行最大80个字符 缩进默认4个占位符 使用空格进行缩进,而不是TAB按键 if,else,while,case,for使用的时候附加空格,forAll后不附加空格 前默认空置4个字符并对齐 如 Info<< ... os << ... 下面这种是不正确的: WarningInFunction << "Warning message" 省略没必要的注释 类声明注释居中显示如 /*-----------------------------------------...
best  practice  code  howto  habit  c++  ofm 
july 2018 by aries1988
How to Write a Git Commit Message
The seven rules of a great git commit message
Keep in mind: This has all been said before.
Separate subject from body with a blank line
Limit the subject line to 50 characters
Capitalize the subject line
Do not end the subject line with a period
Use the imperative mood in the subject line
Wrap the body at 72 characters
Use the body to explain what and why vs. how
best  practice  git  development  programming  tool 
august 2016 by aries1988
typography - Should subscripts in math mode be upright? - TeX - LaTeX Stack Exchange
Using "all italics" is unfortunately an often committed sin. You should italicize only variables.

Everything else should be upright. For example:

function names (sin, cos, log, ln etc...)
dimensionless numbers (Re, Pr, Ra...)
exact infinitesimal increments (dx, dy et... in BOTH integrals and differentials)
descriptive text
all descriptive variable indices (unless they are also variables)
Exceptions to this rule may still apply, i.e. the Euler-number $e$ is no variable, but still traditionally written in italics.
best  practice  latex  maths 
september 2015 by aries1988
Git and Vimdiff
git log --pretty=format:"[%h] %ae, %ar: %s" --stat
diff  git  programming  vim  best  practice 
march 2015 by aries1988
Using Vim, isn't there a more efficient way to format LaTeX paragraphs according to this best practice? - Stack Overflow
One way to do this is not by actually breaking the lines in the file but instead doing the following:
best  practice  latex  vim 
march 2015 by aries1988
The Physical Exam as Refuge - NYTimes.com

Countless times, I have found that it is only during the physical exam that patients reveal what is truly on their mind. Whether it is the cough that they are reminded of now that I am listening to their lungs, or whether it is the domestic violence, the eating disorder or the genital symptoms that they feel comfortable revealing once we are in a more intimate setting — there is something about touch that changes the dynamic.

But then the doctor and patient move to the exam table, and everything changes. This is often the first moment that they can talk directly, without the impediment of technology. They are physically closer to each other, actually touching. This is an intimacy, albeit of the nonromantic type, but an intimacy nonetheless. And all intimacies have an effect of changing the dynamics of the interaction. Obviously, there is a risk of changing for the worse, but in my experience it is almost always a change for the better. Once a doctor and patient are at the exam table, touching, talking without the computer between them, conversation of a different sort is possible.
doctor  people  temoignage  body  medicine  opinion  psychology  human  communication  practice 
october 2014 by aries1988

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