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Becoming Napoleon And Buddha: The Untold Secrets To Leading Your Business Empire - Siddha Performance
how to become a great leader

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Listen to your team, communicate as efficiently as possible, be an example, be passionate, be consistent, make firm decisions, identify mentors and role models, interfere only when necessary, know your limits, know your strengths, know your weaknesses, don’t make excuses, do good, meet new people, temper your reactions, and have fun . . .

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To lead your empire, you must understand human beings.

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You need only understand the heart which beats within them. And the mind which mercilessly rules them.

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If you wish to get them to do something, you must provide for them a vision.

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Understand, my friend, that this empire will not make you whole. You must arrive whole.

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Your army must see in You what they’ve always longed to see in themselves.

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Understand, my friend, that man is hungry for a journey more than he is hungry for a job.

He will appease you if you feed his stomach. But he will walk with you to the end of the earth if you feed his soul.

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Slowly, carefully, and strategically, we will tease away the sinews and vines that keep you tethered to your destructive mind.

For it is bound by you. And you are bound by it.

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july 2018 by bekishore
Marie Kondo and the Ruthless War on Stuff - The New York Times
In order to be considered tidy, you must have completed the method outlined in Kondo’s book. It includes something called a “once-in-a-lifetime tidying marathon,” which means piling five categories of material possessions — clothing, books, papers, miscellaneous items and sentimental items, including photos, in that order — one at a time, surveying how much of each you have, seeing that it’s way too much and then holding each item to see if it sparks joy in your body. The ones that spark joy get to stay. The ones that don’t get a heartfelt and generous goodbye, via actual verbal communication, and are then sent on their way to their next life. This is the crux of the KonMari — that soon-to-be-trademarked nickname — and it is detailed in “The Life-Changing Magic” and her more recent book, “Spark Joy,” which, as far as I can tell, is a more specific “The Life-Changing Magic of Tidying Up” but with folding diagrams. She is often mistaken for someone who thinks you shouldn’t own anything, but that’s wrong. Rather, she thinks you can own as much or as little as you like, as long as every possession brings you true joy.
tidy  crux  marie  kondo  stuff  war  thing  things 
july 2016 by bekishore

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