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brendanmcfadden : authors   7

Celeste Ng: By the Book - The New York Times
The author of, most recently, “Little Fires Everywhere,” often returns to “The Count of Monte Cristo”: “Right now, I see it as an exploration of the complexities of good and evil and how easily one shifts into the other.
celesteng  nytimes  interview  books  writing  literature  authors  bookreview 
november 2017 by brendanmcfadden
Louis Sachar, the Children’s-Book Author Who Introduced Me to Style | The New Yorker
I first read Louis Sachar’s Wayside School books in second grade, and I felt as if I’d been psychologically recognized, like a neon fetishist discovering Dan Flavin, or a millennial stoner happening upon “Broad City.”
fiction  jiatolentino  thenewyorker  childrensbooks  kidsbooks  books  literature  writing  writers  authors  louissachar 
september 2017 by brendanmcfadden
A Lot Like Prayer: Remembering Denis Johnson - The New York Times
I was working as an editor at Esquire in 1990 when I sent the novelist and poet Denis Johnson a photograph I’d clipped from The New York Times of a Liberian fighter in the country’s civil war, posing at the edge of a field, resplendently horrific in a wedding gown, cradling an automatic rifle, a woman’s wig perched jauntily atop his head.
denisjohnson  nytimes  books  literature  authors  writing  writers 
september 2017 by brendanmcfadden
‘A Writer Writes’: Penelope Lively’s Fiction Defies the Test of Time - The New York Times
The British novelist Penelope Lively is fascinated by contingency — the idea that an entire life is shaped by small decisions that seem inconsequential at the time. In 2005, she published a sort of anti-memoir, “Making It Up,” in which she imagined all the different directions her life might have taken.
nytimes  penelopelively  writers  authors  books  literature 
september 2017 by brendanmcfadden
Zadie Smith on the Genius of Graham Greene - The Guardian
Graham Greene, whose centenary is next month, was a more ethically complex novelist than is usually remembered, argues Zadie Smith. The Quiet American, his love story set in the chaos of 1950s Vietnam, shows him to be the greatest journalist there ever was
grahamgreene  literature  literarycriticism  zadiesmith  writers  writing  authors  thequietamerican  theguardian  books 
june 2017 by brendanmcfadden
'Am I Being Catfished?' An Author Confronts Her Number One Online Critic
When a bad review of her first novel appeared online, Kathleen Hale was warned not to respond. But she soon found herself wading in
author  authors  essay  psychology  writers  writing  criticism  internet  socialmedia  technology  blogs  theguardian  kathleenhale 
october 2014 by brendanmcfadden

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