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brendanmcfadden : canada   13

Vancouver Island, Through an Artist’s Eyes - The New York Times
Revered in British Columbia, little known in the U.S., the artist Emily Carr, born in Victoria in 1871, may be from another era, but amid environmental concerns, her words and images resonate.
canada  travel  vancouver  emilycarr  vancouverisland  nytimes 
october 2017 by brendanmcfadden
Tragedies and Triumphs: Canadians Tell Their Family Histories - The New York Times
July 1 is the 150th anniversary of Canada’s founding as a nation. It will be a day celebrated by newcomers seeking economic opportunity or refuge from war, immigrants of several generations and descendants of arrivals from more than a hundred years ago. For aboriginal peoples, who remain subjected to discriminatory policies, the anniversary is not one to celebrate.
canada  history  discrimination  nytimes 
september 2017 by brendanmcfadden
What Do You Call 101 Hidden Islands in Quebec? - Atlas Obscura
Literature-inspired naming of land in the remote Caniapiscau Reservoir has caused controversy.
atlasobscura  mapping  cartography  caniapiscaureservoir  quebec  canada  islands 
september 2017 by brendanmcfadden
The Ghost Villages of Newfoundland - Atlas Obscura
The small village near Trinity Bay, Newfoundland, was once a charming place to live. A quaint, centuries-old fishing village, that overlooked the sea, with winding lanes, asymmetrical “saltbox” family homes, and quiet streets filled with a post office, church, and a graveyard. It would be an idyllic, country scene, apart from the fact there are no people.
atlasobscura  newfoundland  canada  abandoned  ghosttowns  trinitybay  fishingvillage 
august 2017 by brendanmcfadden
The Long History of Terrified Americans Fleeing to Canada
Today, the farmers who work the verdant fields of Buxton, a small farming community in southern Ontario about an hour’s drive from Detroit, are mostly white. But a visitor in the 1850s would have found its neat rows of corn and golden wheat being tended by black farmers—free and formerly enslaved Americans who had fled the United States.
splinter  canada  slavery  history  border 
august 2017 by brendanmcfadden
Tragedies and Triumphs: Canadians Tell Their Family Histories - The New York Times
July 1 is the 150th anniversary of Canada’s founding as a nation. It will be a day celebrated by newcomers seeking economic opportunity or refuge from war, immigrants of several generations and descendants of arrivals from more than a hundred years ago. For aboriginal peoples, who remain subjected to discriminatory policies, the anniversary is not one to celebrate.
canada  canadaday  nytimes  aboriginalpeople  nativepeople 
july 2017 by brendanmcfadden
Tofino, the Canadian Surf Town Seafood Lovers Need to Visit | Bon Appetit
Tofino may be heaven on earth. If heaven were a tiny surf town in British Columbia surrounded by ancient rainforests, pristine coastline, and pine-covered peaks. chef Nick Nutting of local favorite Wolf in the Fog invites us along for an afternoon of foraging, driftwood-fire cooking, and plenty of fried oysters down by the water
tofino  britishcolumbia  canada  travel  food  bonappetit 
june 2017 by brendanmcfadden
An Apocalypse in the Beaches — William Kurelek's Nightmare Visions
He was, in a lot ways, something of a Canadian stereotype. He was born in a shack on the Prairies during the winter of 1927. He grew up working on his parents' farm, ploughing fields and tending cows. When he was older, he worked as a lumberjack in the towering forests of Québec and on the shores of Lake Superior. As a construction worker, he put curbs on the streets of Edmonton and built grain elevators in Thunder Bay. As a waiter, he served the rich and famous at the Royal York Hotel in Toronto. And as a painter... Well, as a painter, he became one of the most successful artists in Canadian history, using scenes from his past to capture the spirit of the nation on canvasses that sell for hundreds of thousands of dollars.
williamkurelek  canada  canadian  art  painting 
june 2017 by brendanmcfadden
Shell Lake Murders
The Shell Lake murders is the name of a single mass murder incident committed by Victor Ernest Hoffman in Shell Lake, Saskatchewan, Canada, during the early morning of August 15, 1967.
crime  murder  victorhoffman  canada  massmurder 
july 2015 by brendanmcfadden
Miles from Nowhere
On a return trip to the wilderness of British Columbia, the author revisits a rough and exquisite landscape
canada  britishcolumbia  theamericanscholar 
november 2012 by brendanmcfadden

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