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brendanmcfadden : concussions   6

Why former 49er Chris Borland is the most dangerous man in football
ONE DAY IN April, the NFL asked Chris Borland to take a random drug test. The timing of this request was, in a word, bizarre, since Borland, a San Francisco 49ers linebacker, had retired a month earlier after a remarkable rookie season. He said he feared getting brain damage if he continued to play. Borland had been amazed at the reaction to his decision, the implications of which many saw as a direct threat to the NFL. And now here was an email demanding that he pee in a cup before a league proctor within 24 hours or fail the test. "I figured if I said no, people would think I was on drugs," he said recently. That, he believed, "would ruin my life." As he thought about how to respond, Borland began to wonder how random this drug test really was.
football  chrisborland  concussions  nfl  sports  espnthemagazine 
august 2015 by brendanmcfadden
The People V. Football
When Jeanne Marie Laskas started reporting on the devastating impact of repeated hits to football players' brains in 2009, the NFL was still in denial. By now the evidence is irrefutable, and every bloody Sunday (and Monday and Thursday) it becomes a little harder not to cringe with each collision. But if you're a guy like former star linebacker Fred McNeill who's living with the effects of those hits, the question is: How can we keep watching the game—and how can we keep asking our kids to play it?
gq  concussions  cte  football  nfl  brain  health 
may 2012 by brendanmcfadden

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