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brendanmcfadden : curbed   11

Planning Mexico City’s future - Curbed
How Mexico City’s urban innovation lab tackles the city’s challenges
mexicocity  mexico  curbed  urbanism  urbanplanning  technology  innovationlab  cities 
april 2018 by brendanmcfadden
Elizabeth Gordon’s International Style - Curbed
The legendary 'House Beautiful' editor had a complicated relationship with Frank Lloyd Wright—and global design.
franklloydwright  elizabethgordon  curbed  architecture  design 
june 2017 by brendanmcfadden
Meet Mary Colter, the Architect Who Conjured the Romance of the American West - Curbed
They rise along the south rim of the Grand Canyon, rough-hewn structures built mostly of stone and timber, so elemental, so rooted in their surroundings, that many visitors have mistaken them for remnants of pioneer days or prehistory. This was the intent of their creator, Mary Elizabeth Jane Colter (1869-1958), one of America's earliest women architects and one of the first architects to give American buildings a site-specific sense of place. Yet few of the nearly five million people who visit Grand Canyon National Park every year are aware of Colter. No wonder she's been called "the best-known unknown architect in the national parks."
marycolter  architecture  nationalparks  grandcanyonnationalpark  curbed 
june 2017 by brendanmcfadden
The Quest to Save LA's Century-Old Batchelder Tiles - Curbed
On the ground floor of a run-down, four-story building at 217 West 6th Street in downtown Los Angeles, on the block between South Broadway and South Spring, is one of the city's greatest interior-architecture treasures: an enchanting installation of custom tiles that renowned Pasadena artist and tile innovator Ernest Batchelder created for the Dutch Chocolate Shop one hundred years ago, in 1914.
ernestbatchelder  losangeles  curbed  interiordesign  architecture  california  southerncalifornia 
february 2016 by brendanmcfadden
Finding Yaangna, the Ancestral Village of LA's Native People
Los Angeles has the largest Native American population in the US, but of all the tribes represented here, the fewest people belong to the region's own Gabrieleno/Tongva communities. "The first nations people of the Los Angeles Basin covered a significant expanse of territory, reaching north to Malibu, traveling into the southern sectors of Orange County and east into Riverside County, including the four Southern Channel Islands," writes Cindi Moar Alvitre in her LAtitudes essay "Coyote Tours," but their "principal ancestral village" was Yaangna, which "moved along the Los Angeles River for countless generations, before the water was confined and silenced within a concrete sarcophagus, separating the people from that which gives life."
curbed  curbedla  losangeles  yaangna  nativeamericans  history 
january 2016 by brendanmcfadden
The Creation of Beachwood Canyon's Theosophist "Dreamland"
In 1918, LA Times reporter Grace Kingsley went to visit Krotona, the national headquarters of the Theosophical Society. This idealistic community of around 300 or so was nestled in the hills of Beachwood Canyon, above the expanding village of Hollywood.
curbed  curbedla  beachwoodcanyon  theosophism  krotona  hollywood  hollywoodhills  spirituality  religion 
january 2016 by brendanmcfadden
30-Year-Old Folk Art Project Remains a Constant in a Changing Detroit
The Heidelberg Project offers a different experience every visit. On a blindingly blue and gold fall day, the trees lining Heidelberg street carry heavy canopy, the leaves brown and gold and green and yellow. People walk slowly among the old homes, pausing often to look at new displays. Some of the visuals competing for attention include a fence covered in hundreds of shoes, a park bench made of reclaimed golden oak, circles in sage and indigo and dusty pink on the blacktop of the street itself.
theheidelbergproject  folkart  art  outsiderart  detroit  michigan  curbed 
november 2015 by brendanmcfadden
7 Fake U.S. Cities and Towns With Very Real Purposes
Whether built for testing, special training, or a military ruse, fake cities have a unique place in military and technological history.
curbed  fakecities 
november 2015 by brendanmcfadden
Meet Mary Colter, the Architect Who Conjured the Romance of the American West
They rise along the south rim of the Grand Canyon, rough-hewn structures built mostly of stone and timber, so elemental, so rooted in their surroundings, that many visitors have mistaken them for remnants of pioneer days or prehistory. This was the intent of their creator, Mary Elizabeth Jane Colter (1869-1958), one of America's earliest women architects and one of the first architects to give American buildings a site-specific sense of place
curbed  architecture  marycolter  americanwest  southwest 
august 2015 by brendanmcfadden
17 Ways to Make Your Tiny Apartment Feel Like a Tree House
There is a smug sense of superiority that comes along with transforming a 250-square-feet-of-gloom apartment into an arboreal hideaway. After all, it's no easy task. There are bright green prints to pick out, refurbished wood chairs to haggle over, and the beckoning calls of your dehydrated flora to answer. But, these 17 objects might make it a bit easier.
interior  design  home  apartments  curbed 
june 2015 by brendanmcfadden

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