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The Man Who Knew Too Little - The New York Times
The most ignorant man in America knows that Donald Trump is president — but that’s about it. Living a liberal fantasy is complicated.
politics  technology  news  nytimes  erikhagerman  ohio  athensohio  donaldtrump  media 
april 2018 by brendanmcfadden
Nicolás Maduro’s Accelerating Revolution | The New Yorker
Venezuela’s President has outmaneuvered his opponents. Can he survive an economy in free fall?
politics  venezuela  nicolasmaduro  thenewyorker 
december 2017 by brendanmcfadden
The Mystery of Mary Trump - POLITICO Magazine
Donald Trump reveres his father but almost never talks about his mother. Why not?
politico  marytrump  donaldtrump  politics  history 
november 2017 by brendanmcfadden
Remembering Baseball’s Right-Wing Rotation - The Ringer
When three Padres pitchers came forward as members of the John Birch Society in 1984, the sports world was challenged by a different kind of political activism
theringer  bryancurtis  johnbirchsociety  sandiego  padres  baseball  sports  politics  ericshow  davedravecky  markthurmond 
november 2017 by brendanmcfadden
The Danger of President Pence | The New Yorker
Trump’s critics yearn for his exit. But Mike Pence, the corporate right’s inside man, poses his own risks.
mikepence  politics  government  donaldtrump  thenewyorker  janemayer 
october 2017 by brendanmcfadden
The World Series National Anthem That Infuriated America - Deadspin
The current crop of athletes protesting during the national anthem has roots at the 1968 Olympics, with the Black Power salute of Tommie Smith and John Carlos after they finished first and third, respectively, in the 200 meters. John Dominis’s famous photograph of the two U.S. sprinters on the medal podium, their heads bowed, each with a black-gloved fist raised high throughout the playing of the anthem, captured an indelible moment of public protest and civic activism at the height of the Civil Rights Movement. What often gets overlooked is the controversy over the “Star-Spangled Banner” that was already raging—specifically, the anthem as sung before Game 5 of the 1968 World Series, exactly nine days before Smith and Carlos thrust their fists into the thin air of Mexico City.
deadspin  baseball  sports  nationalanthem  controversy  politics  1968  josefeliciano  civilrights  starspangeledbanner 
october 2017 by brendanmcfadden
Elaine Welteroth, Teen Vogue’s Refashionista - The New York Times
The editor in chief has taken on a seemingly impossible task: reinventing the glossy magazine for a hyperempathetic generation.
elainewelteroth  teenvogue  nytimes  nytimesmag  politics  cultural 
october 2017 by brendanmcfadden
How Fake News Turned a Small Town Upside Down - The New York Times
At the height of the 2016 election, exaggerated reports of a juvenile sex crime brought a media maelstrom toTwin Falls — one the Idaho city still hasn’t recovered from.
politics  russia  twinfalls  idaho  news  fakenews  socialmedia  conservativemedia  nytimes  nytimesmag 
october 2017 by brendanmcfadden
Richard Posner, Leader of a Legal Revolution - Bloomberg
No one comes close to the retired federal judge in terms of influence on contemporary law.
bloomberg  richardposner  courtsystem  legalsystem  law  judiciary  judicialsystem  politics 
september 2017 by brendanmcfadden
Undercover in North Korea: “All Paths Lead to Catastrophe” - The Intercept
The most alarming aspect of North Korea’s latest nuclear test, and the larger standoff with the U.S., is how little is known about how North Korea truly functions. For 70 years it’s been sealed off from the rest of the world to a degree hard to comprehend, especially at a time when people in Buenos Aires need just one click to share cat videos shot in Kuala Lumpur. Few outsiders have had intimate contact with North Korean society, and even fewer are in a position to talk about it.
theintercept  northkorea  politics  internationalrelations  military  kimjongun 
september 2017 by brendanmcfadden
Chirlane McCray and the Limits of First-Ladyship - The New York Times
What two years in Gracie Mansion have meant for a woman who aspired to be the “voice for the forgotten voices.”
chirlanemccray  nytimes  nytimesmag  rachelkaadzighansah  politics  new  york  billdeblasio 
september 2017 by brendanmcfadden
The Long, Lonely Road of Chelsea Manning - The New York Times
Her disclosure of classified documents in 2010 ushered in the age of leaks. Now, freed from prison, she talks about why she did it — and the isolation that followed.
chelseamanning  politics  wikileaks  classifiedocuments  leaks  leakers  whistleblowers  nytimes  nytimesmag  Military 
september 2017 by brendanmcfadden
The Man Behind Trump’s Voter-Fraud Obsession - The New York Times
How Kris Kobach, the Kansas secretary of state, plans to remake America through restrictive voting and immigration laws.
kriskobach  nytimes  kansas  nytimesmag  votingrights  votersupression  politics  elections 
september 2017 by brendanmcfadden
How ‘Snowflake’ Became America’s Inescapable Tough-Guy Taunt - The New York Times
Every age has its own preferred terms of political emasculation. Teddy Roosevelt called Woodrow Wilson a “white-handy Miss Nancy.” Adlai Stevenson was dubbed “Adelaide.” Michael Dukakis was called a “pansy,” George H.W. Bush a “wimp” and John Kerry — in a subtle feat of gendered rhetoric — an effete “flip-flopper” who “looks French.” It’s not just individual politicians who are painted as deficient in their manhood, either. Ideas and coalitions get the same treatment: Irving Kristol observed in the 1990s that “the American welfare state has had a feminine coloration from the very beginning”; Orrin Hatch once called the Democrats “the party of homosexuals.” These days, the preferred insult is a new addition to the canon: “snowflake.”
nytimes  nytimesmag  amandahess  snowflake  altright  insults  politics 
september 2017 by brendanmcfadden
Is Being ‘Unapologetic’ the New Patriotic — or a Form of Resistance? - The New York Times
We’re living in sorry times, people. And by ‘‘sorry,’’ I mean ‘‘not sorry.’’ Right now, the far-right website Breitbart News is selling T-shirts emblazoned with the words ‘‘Unapologetically American.’’ The shirt’s label is printed with the Breitbart logo, ‘‘Made in USA’’ and ‘‘#WAR.’’ This is a shirt that wants to be starting something. Jamming ‘‘unapologetically’’ in front of ‘‘American’’ like that, with all those aggro fixin’s, implies that anybody wearing a different shirt doesn’t love America.
politics  wesleymorris  nytimes  nytimesmag  culture  politicalcorrectness 
september 2017 by brendanmcfadden
Down the Breitbart Hole - The New York Times
Steve Bannon once said it was the platform for the alt-right. Its current
editors disagree. Is the incendiary media company at the nerve center
of Donald Trump’s America simply provocative — or dangerous?
wilshylton  breitbart  altright  politics  nytimes  nytimesmag 
september 2017 by brendanmcfadden
Elaine Welteroth, Teen Vogue’s Refashionista - The New York Times
The editor in chief has taken on a seemingly impossible task: reinventing the glossy magazine for a hyperempathetic generation.
elainewelteroth  teenvogue  nytimes  magazines  politics  women  feminism 
september 2017 by brendanmcfadden
Trump’s Business of Corruption | The New Yorker
What secrets will Mueller find when he investigates the President’s foreign deals?
russia  corruption  trump  politics  donaldtrump  adamdavidson  thenewyorker  robertmueller 
august 2017 by brendanmcfadden
Interview With a Woman Who Recently Had an Abortion at 32 Weeks - Jezebel
Elizabeth* is 35. She grew up in the South, currently lives in Brooklyn, and has been married for two years. After a previous miscarriage at 10 weeks, she was overjoyed to find herself pregnant for a second time. At 31 weeks, she found out that the baby boy she was carrying wouldn’t be able to breathe outside the womb and would not survive. And at 32 weeks, she flew to Colorado to get a shot that would start the process of a third-trimester abortion; she then flew back to New York to finish the delivery. We talked on the phone two weeks into her recovery.
abortion  politics  health  jiatolentino  jezebel  reproductiverights 
august 2017 by brendanmcfadden
Donald Trump’s Worst Deal - The New Yorker
The President helped build a hotel in Azerbaijan that appears to be a corrupt operation engineered by oligarchs tied to Iran’s Revolutionary Guard.
thenewyorker  donaldtrump  azerbaijan  realestate  politics  iran  revolutionaryguard  adamdavidson 
august 2017 by brendanmcfadden
How America Went Haywire - The Atlantic
The nation’s current post-truth moment is the ultimate expression of mind-sets that have made America exceptional throughout its history.
kurtanderson  politics  culture  theatlantic 
august 2017 by brendanmcfadden
Prominent Democratic Fundraisers Realign to Lobby for Trump’s Agenda
After President Donald Trump’s upset election victory, Democratic insiders who worked on Hillary Clinton’s failed presidential bid weren’t necessarily relegated to the sidelines. Many, in fact, are cashing in as lobbyists — by working to advance Trump’s agenda.
politics  lobbying  lobbyists  theintercept  corruption 
june 2017 by brendanmcfadden
How Richard Spencer Became an Icon for White Supremacists - The Atlantic
Richard Spencer is a troll and an icon for white supremacists. He was also my high-school classmate.
politics  altright  neonazism  whitesupremacy  graemewood  richardspencer  theatlantic 
june 2017 by brendanmcfadden
Religious Liberals Sat Out of Politics for 40 Years. Now They Want in the Game. - The New York Times
Faith leaders whose politics fall to the left of center are getting more
involved in politics to fight against President Trump’s policies.
nytimes  religion  politics  faith  religiousleaders  williamjbarber 
june 2017 by brendanmcfadden
Can a New Generation in the Banlieues Change French Politics? - The New York Times
A Muslim city councilor in a stagnant Paris suburb makes
the case for modernizing the nation’s Republican values.
france  politics  populism  islam  muslisms  paris  nytimes  nytimesmag 
june 2017 by brendanmcfadden
How Did ‘Witch Hunt’ Become the Complaint of the Powerful? - The New York Times
“Witch hunt” seemed like a particularly Trumpish complaint — an unshakable belief in his own persecution leading him to compare his own experiences to vastly worse ones — and indeed, it was the fifth time since January that he had denounced one “witch hunt” or another on Twitter. But an obsession with the witch hunt long precedes him in American politics: In the last century, a parade of disgraced presidents and other public figures (almost all of them men) have also chosen to don this particular black mantle of victimhood. “Witch hunt” once meant persecution of the marginalized by the powerful. So how did it come to suggest something so nearly the opposite?
witchhunt  donaldtrump  politics  mccarthyism  communism  language  nytimes  nytimesmag 
june 2017 by brendanmcfadden
Jared Kushner’s Other Real Estate Empire - The New York Times
Baltimore-area renters complain about a property owner they say is neglectful and litigious. Few know their landlord is the president’s son-in-law.
business  politics  donaldtrump  jarodkushner  realestate  legalsystem  tenantsrights  exploitation  slumlords  baltimore  maryland  nytimes  nytimesmag  propublica  alecmacgillis 
june 2017 by brendanmcfadden
Homework? First I Need to Get to the Bottom of This Comey Story - The New York Times
It’s 7:32 on a recent Wednesday morning, and Gabe Fleisher is racing to put the finishing touches on his daily newsletter, Wake Up to Politics. It’s been a busy 24-hour news cycle. “Another day, another bombshell,” the newsletter begins.
gabefleisher  politics  news  newsletters  teenagers  wakeuptopolitics  nytimes 
june 2017 by brendanmcfadden
Top-Secret NSA Report Details Russian Hacking Effort Days Before 2016 Election - The Intercept
Russian military intelligence executed a cyberattack on at least one U.S. voting software supplier and sent spear-phishing emails to more than 100 local election officials just days before last November’s presidential election, according to a highly classified intelligence report obtained by The Intercept.
russia  politics  nsa  voting  hacking  theintercept  cyberattack  2016election 
june 2017 by brendanmcfadden
Before He Brought Down Nixon, Carl Bernstein Was A Far-Out Rock And Roll Writer
Watergate and the Beatles are multimedia evergreens. Just last week alone, for example, the History Channel commissioned a documentary series on the scandal that brought down a president, and Variety reported that yet another feature film about Watergate, The Silent Man, is now scheduled to hit theaters in September. And on Friday, special editions of Sgt. Pepper’s Lonely Hearts Club Band, the 1967 album that brought down the pop single, were re-issued to celebrate/exploit the 50th anniversary of the disc’s original release.

Carl Bernstein had ties to both. His work at the Washington Post during Watergate was what justifiably made Bernstein a household name. But what’s not so well known is that before he became a reporting legend, Bernstein was a critic at the newspaper. A pop critic. And Sgt. Pepper was among his first critiques.
carlbernstein  watergate  thebeatles  music  politics  deadspin  musicriticism 
june 2017 by brendanmcfadden
An Artist’s Mythic Rebellion for the Venice Biennale - The New York Times
Mark Bradford’s concern: How can he represent the United States when he no
longer feels represented by his government?
markbradford  art  artist  politics  nytimes 
may 2017 by brendanmcfadden
My President Was Black - The Atlantic
A history of the first African American White House—and of what came next
tanehisicoates  theatlantic  history  politics  obama  barackobama  michelleobama  the  obamas  race  racism 
may 2017 by brendanmcfadden
Political correctness: how the right invented a phantom enemy | Moira Weigel | US news | The Guardian
For 25 years, invoking this vague and ever-shifting nemesis has been a favourite tactic of the right – and Donald Trump’s victory is its greatest triumph
pcculture  politicalcorrectness  conservatism  politics  highereducation  education  think  tanks  universities  theguardian  america  trump  donaldtrump 
may 2017 by brendanmcfadden
Barack Obama and Doris Kearns Goodwin: The Ultimate Exit Interview
As his two-term presidency draws to a close, Barack Obama is looking back—at the legacies of his predecessors, as well as his own—and forward, to the freedom of life after the White House. In a wide-ranging conversation with one of the nation’s foremost presidential historians, he talks about his ambitions, frustrations, and the decisions that still haunt him.
vanityfair  barackobama  doriskearnsgoodwin  interview  politics  presidentialhistory  history 
october 2016 by brendanmcfadden
The Boy Can't Help It
Eager provocateur and epic carouser Christopher Hitchens has started making some new enemies lately -- his friends. So what's troubling the media's biggest troublemaker?
christopherhitchens  profile  politics  washingtondc  newyorkmagazine  nymagazine 
october 2016 by brendanmcfadden
James Fallows Journeys Across America
Most people in the U.S. believe their country is going to hell. But they’re wrong. What a three-year journey by single-engine plane reveals about reinvention and renewal.
jamesfallows  theatlantic  culture  politics  economy 
february 2016 by brendanmcfadden
New Koch
The billionaire brothers are championing criminal-justice reform. Has their formula changed?
politics  kochbrothers  thenewyorker  janemayer  criminaljustice  criminaljusticereform 
january 2016 by brendanmcfadden
The Killing of Osama bin Laden
It’s been four years since a group of US Navy Seals assassinated Osama bin Laden in a night raid on a high-walled compound in Abbottabad, Pakistan. The killing was the high point of Obama’s first term, and a major factor in his re-election. The White House still maintains that the mission was an all-American affair, and that the senior generals of Pakistan’s army and Inter-Services Intelligence agency (ISI) were not told of the raid in advance. This is false, as are many other elements of the Obama administration’s account.
seymourhersh  osamabinladen  terrorism  islam  middleeast  pakistan  military  politics  londonreviewofbooks 
january 2016 by brendanmcfadden
With Ben Carson, the Doctor and the Politician Can Vary Sharply
When he was not in the operating room at Johns Hopkins Hospital, performing one of his 400 surgeries a year, Dr. Ben Carson could often be seen walking slowly through the hallways, hands behind his back, nodding, smiling and speaking softly to co-workers and students who approached.
nytimes  bencarson  politics  presidency  2016 
november 2015 by brendanmcfadden
Wellstone!
Online for the first time ever, Wellstone! is a heartfelt and surprisingly funny documentary of a unique political couple.
documentary  paulwellstone  politics  minnesota 
november 2015 by brendanmcfadden
Can Black Art Ever Escape the Politics of Race?
For 18 months, the writer Richard Wright, late of Harlem and Biloxi, Miss., lay sick, then convalescent, then sick again, then dying, in France, writing thousands of haiku. This lasted from 1959 to 1960, years of chaos and promise and growth around the world, especially in Africa, where nation after nation threw off its colonial oppressors.
art  race  politics  nytimes 
august 2015 by brendanmcfadden
Bernie Sanders Released a Spoken Word Album in 1987 and Frankly It Rules
“Can Bernie Sanders sing? No, he can’t,” writes Eusebius, the top-rated Amazon reviewer of We Shall Overcome, Bernie Sanders’ first an only spoken-word music album. “I wanted to have a chuckle at his expense, but I stayed and listened with deep admiration.” Eusebius, I agree.
berniesanders  gawker  spokenword  album  politics 
august 2015 by brendanmcfadden
A Dream Undone
Inside the 50-year campaign to roll back the Voting Rights Act.
nytimes  nytimesmag  votingrightsact  politics  civilrights 
august 2015 by brendanmcfadden
The Clintonian Theory of Foreign Money
The Bill, Hillary & Chelsea Clinton Foundation has a new, shorter list of the foreign governments whose money it will take, the Wall Street Journal reported. This is unsatisfying for anyone who thinks that the number of names on that list should be zero, now that Hillary Clinton is running for President. If she wants to be a champion for ordinary Americans, as she said in a video released last weekend, why let one of the first stories after her announcement be that the foundation with her name on it takes checks from officials in other countries?
thenewyorker  hillaryclinton  billclinton  money  politics 
april 2015 by brendanmcfadden
The NRA's Murder Mystery
Today, Robert Dowlut is the National Rifle Association’s top lawyer. Fifty years ago, he was convicted of murdering a woman with a handgun.
motherjones  politics  NRA  guns  crime 
august 2014 by brendanmcfadden
The Invisible Bridge
Consider 1975. There were 89 terrorist bombings on American soil; two assassination attempts, 19 days apart, on President Gerald Ford; and a Gallup poll finding that 75 percent of American women were afraid to walk near their homes at night.
books  literature  nytimes  theinvisiblebridge  rickperlstein  politics  republican  campaigns 
july 2014 by brendanmcfadden
A libertarian utopia
Libertarians are united by opposition to government, but when it comes to planning a new society they are deeply divided
libertarianism  politics  freemarket  libertarianutopia  aeon 
july 2014 by brendanmcfadden
Take Two: Hillary's Choice
How Hillary Clinton turned herself into the consummate Washington player.
hillaryclinton  politics  theatlantic  joshuagreen 
july 2014 by brendanmcfadden
Burglars Who Took On F.B.I. Abandon Shadows - NYTimes.com
The perfect crime is far easier to pull off when nobody is watching. So on a night nearly 43 years ago, while Muhammad Ali and Joe Frazier bludgeoned each other over 15 rounds in a televised title bout viewed by millions around the world, burglars took a lock pick and a crowbar and broke into a Federal Bureau of Investigation office in a suburb of Philadelphia, making off with nearly every document inside.
nytimes  crime  politics  fbi 
january 2014 by brendanmcfadden
The Welfare Queen
Ronald Reagan made Linda Taylor a notorious American villain. Her other sins were far worse.
politics  race  ronaldreagan  lindataylor  welfare  slate 
december 2013 by brendanmcfadden
Qassem Suleimani, the Middle East’s Most Powerful Operative
Qassem Suleimani is the Iranian operative who has been reshaping the Middle East. Now he’s directing Assad’s war in Syria.
thenewyorker  iran  middleeast  politics  syria 
december 2013 by brendanmcfadden
A Bill is Killed; A Star is Born
WITH ALL THE STRANGE THINGS THAT HAPPENED DURING WENDY DAVIS'S FILIBUSTER, THERE'S ONE POINT THAT HAS GONE ALMOST UNNOTICED.
politics  bill  texasmonthly  abortion  texas  filibuster  wendydavis 
june 2013 by brendanmcfadden
Jerry Brown's Political Reboot
In his reprise as governor, he's been as ruthlessly practical as he's been reflective, embracing his inner politician to restore the California dream.
politics  jerrybrown  jamesfallows  california  theatlantic 
may 2013 by brendanmcfadden
For John Carona, Conflicts and Interests
On the blurry ethical lines in the part-time Texas state legislature, where politicians and CEO’s are one and the same.
politics  corruption  texas  thetexastribune 
may 2013 by brendanmcfadden
How Soccer Explains Israel
Jerusalem's FC Beitar signed two Muslim players from Russia in February and stirred a national controversy
grantland  politics  sports  Israel  middleeast  war  soccer 
april 2013 by brendanmcfadden
The Once and Future Gov
Two years into his second go-round as governor, Jerry Brown has—to the surprise of many—turned California around.
politics  jerrybrown  california  theamericanprospect  government 
march 2013 by brendanmcfadden
Come On, Feel the Buzz
The rise of Politico news designed to generate clicks, rather than inform.
thebaffler  politics  media  politico 
november 2012 by brendanmcfadden
What Might Have Been
In which George McGovern, the senior member of a rare and burdened tribe, reveals just how long it takes to get over losing the presidency
presidency  election  politics  georgemcgovern  washingtonpost 
november 2012 by brendanmcfadden
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