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brendanmcfadden : prisonconditions   4

The Prison Boom & The Lack of Black Progress After Smith & Welch
More than two decades ago, Smith and Welch (1989) used the 1940 through 1980 census files to document important relative black progress,but this progress did not continue, at least among men. Since 1980, prison populations have grown tremendously in the United States. Here, we show that, at least for the eight states that provide fairly reliable National Corrections Reporting Program (NCRP) data, this growth was driven by a move toward more punitive treatment of those arrested in each major crime category. These changes have had a much larger impact on black communities than white because arrest rates have historically been much greater for blacks than whites. Further, the growth of incarceration rates among black men in recent decades combined with the sharp drop in black employment rates during theGreat Recession have left most black men in a position relative to white men that is really no better than the position they occupied only a few years after the Civil Rights Act of 1965.
prison  prisonconditions  prisonreform  crime  race  racism 
april 2015 by brendanmcfadden
Three Years on Rikers Without Trial
A boy was accused of taking a backpack. The courts took the next three years of his life.
prison  crime  newyork  socialproblems  criminaljustice  prisonconditions  prisons  thenewyorker  rikersisland  kaliefbrowder 
april 2015 by brendanmcfadden

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