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brendanmcfadden : texas   50

Lessons From Hurricane Harvey: Houston’s Struggle Is America’s Tale - The New York Times
The Texas city’s response to a powerful storm says much about polarized visions of the country and diverging attitudes toward cities, race, liberty and science.
houston  texas  climatechange  hurricaneharvey  nytimes 
november 2017 by brendanmcfadden
After the Hurricane Winds Die Down, Larry McMurtry’s Houston Trilogy Lives On - The New York Times
Some claim the three essential books in Texas history are the Bible, the Warren Commission report and Larry McMurtry’s “Lonesome Dove,” his Pulitzer Prize-winning novel about 19th-century cattle drives. This last August, as I watched Hurricane Harvey intensify on my TV screen, the 50 inches of rain in Houston breaking national records, I stayed clear of the Book of Revelation and Oswald and instead hunkered down in safe-haven Austin reading McMurtry. Not, however, his western-themed “Lonesome Dove” — set in the Great Plains and Big Sky country — but his underappreciated Houston trilogy of “Moving On” (1970), “All My Friends Are Going to Be Strangers” (1972), and “Terms of Endearment” (1975), the best novels ever set in America’s fourth largest city. Additionally, his nonfiction essay collection, “In a Narrow Grave” (1968), remains the gold standard for understanding Houston’s brash rootlessness and civic insecurities.
larrymcmurtry  houstontrilogy  nytimes  bookreview  lonesomedove  allmyfriendsaregoingtobestrangers  movingon  literature  books  writers  houston  texas 
october 2017 by brendanmcfadden
For Chicken-Fried Steak, Too Much Is Just Enough - The New York Times
Years ago, on a hot afternoon in a suburb of Dallas, I sat in a restaurant called Babe’s with the Texas food historian Robb Walsh and ate an enormous quantity of chicken-fried steak
food  samsifton  chickenfriedsteak  texas  southernfood  nytimes  nytimesmag  recipes  cooking 
october 2017 by brendanmcfadden
The Rothko Chapel - The New York Times
In 1964, the Houston art collectors and patrons John and Dominique de Menil commissioned Rothko’s work for the interior of a space to be designed by the architect Philip Johnson. (When Johnson clashed with Rothko, the project was turned over to the Houston architects Howard Barnstone and Eugene Aubry.) The de Menils, observant Catholics, were influenced by their friend the Rev. Marie-Alain Couturier, who believed that modern artists could reinvigorate sacred art. The chapel, which opened in 1971, sits next to the campus of the Menil Collection, the museum that now houses the couple’s art. It has been open to the public nearly every day since.
houston  texas  therothkochapel  markrothko  art  design  nytimes 
september 2017 by brendanmcfadden
How to Make Real Texas Nachos | Serious Eats
Real Texas nachos need nothing more than fresh fried tortilla chips, melted cheese, pickled jalapeño, and—if you insist—beans
seriouseats  nachos  texas  food  cooking  recipes 
september 2017 by brendanmcfadden
Houston's Diversity Is America's Future - Pacific Standard
Influxes of African, Asian, and Latino Americans helped Houston's metro area avoid economic stagnation. Could an expected demographic shift on the national level end up reviving other troubled cities?
houston  texas  pacificstandard 
july 2017 by brendanmcfadden
America’s Future Is Texas - The New Yorker
With right-wing zealots taking over the legislature even as the state’s demographics shift leftward, Texas has become the nation’s bellwether.
lawrencewright  texas  thenewyorker 
july 2017 by brendanmcfadden
The Most Important Taco of the Day - Texas Monthly
Breakfast! A multi-generational history of the breakfast taco, via Austin institution the Tamale House. Excerpted from the new book "Austin Breakfast Tacos."
breakfast  breakfasttacos  tacos  food  mexicanfood  texmex  texas  austin  tamalehouse  restaurants  foodculture  texasmonthly 
july 2017 by brendanmcfadden
A Spicy, Greasy, Cheesy, Boozy Southwest Desert Tour | Bon Appetit
Start with a Japanese spa in Santa Fe, end with a chic hotel in Austin, and try all the incredible tamales, tequila, and Texas BBQ you can't miss along the way.
travel  southwest  bonappetit  texas  newmexico  arizona 
june 2017 by brendanmcfadden
How Scared Should People on the Border Be? - The New York Times
Most of it is, in fact, “fake news” — conjecture and unverifiable gossip exchanged over “el Feisbuk,” which is what people here in the Rio Grande Valley call the social network. Instead of snapshots and emojis, it now disseminates warnings. People are frightened, and frightened people repeat things that frighten them more:

Stay at home tomorrow. Immigration and Customs Enforcement is conducting raids in the kitchens.

Don’t send your kids to school on Wednesday. The border patrol is looking for kids with no papers.

Don’t drive down 802 on Fridays anymore.

There’s a checkpoint at the grocery store. They arrested 100 people last night at 10.

Who knows? Some of it might be true.
nytimes  texas  immigration  theborder  border  illegalimmigrants 
may 2017 by brendanmcfadden
The Witness
FOR MORE THAN A DECADE, IT WAS MICHELLE LYONS’S JOB TO OBSERVE THE FINAL MOMENTS OF DEATH ROW INMATES—BUT WATCHING 278 EXECUTIONS DID NOT COME WITHOUT A COST.
texasmonthly  crime  deathpenalty  texas 
september 2014 by brendanmcfadden
Horsemen, Goodbye
THOUGHTS ON THE GRADUAL MARCH OF CIVILITY AND URBAN SPRAWL ACROSS THE LOST FRONTIER.
texasmonthly  larrymcmurtry  texas  literature  writing  thewest 
may 2014 by brendanmcfadden
A Bill is Killed; A Star is Born
WITH ALL THE STRANGE THINGS THAT HAPPENED DURING WENDY DAVIS'S FILIBUSTER, THERE'S ONE POINT THAT HAS GONE ALMOST UNNOTICED.
politics  bill  texasmonthly  abortion  texas  filibuster  wendydavis 
june 2013 by brendanmcfadden
Moon Men: The Private Lives of Neil Armstrong and Pals in “Togethersville”
Neil Armstrong and his fellow astronauts were the stars of the Sixties, but it wasn’t always a smooth ride for their wives, writes Lily Koppel.
togethersville  history  outerspace  astronauts  nasa  texas  houston  lilykoppel  thedailybeast 
may 2013 by brendanmcfadden
For John Carona, Conflicts and Interests
On the blurry ethical lines in the part-time Texas state legislature, where politicians and CEO’s are one and the same.
politics  corruption  texas  thetexastribune 
may 2013 by brendanmcfadden
Darkness on the Plains
FOR DECADES, STANLEY MARSH 3 WAS AMARILLO’S MOST FAMOUS CITIZEN, A WILDLY CREATIVE ECCENTRIC WHO CHARMED EVERYONE HE MET (INCLUDING ME). NOW HIS WORLD IS CRUMBLING AMID SORDID ALLEGATIONS OF SEXUAL ABUSE OF TEENAGE BOYS. HOW COULD WE HAVE ALL BEEN SO WRONG?
stanleymarsh  amarillo  texasmonthly  texas 
april 2013 by brendanmcfadden
The Body in Room 348 - How a Mysterious Beaumont, Texas, Murder Was Solved
The corpse at the Eleganté Hotel stymied the Beaumont, Texas, police. They could find no motive for the killing of popular oil-and-gas man Greg Fleniken—and no explanation for how he had received his strange internal injuries. Bent on tracking down his killer, Fleniken’s widow, Susie, turned to private investigator Ken Brennan, the subject of a previous Vanity Fair story. Once again, as Mark Bowden reports, it was Brennan’s sleuthing that cracked the case.
beaumont  murder  mystery  crime  texas  vanityfair 
april 2013 by brendanmcfadden
Death of a Ranger
BY THE TIME A MINOR DOPE DEALER DISCOVERED THE MAN KICKING IN HIS DOOR WAS A TEXAS RANGER, IT WAS TOO LATE FOR THEM BOTH.
murder  texasrangers  crime  texas 
april 2013 by brendanmcfadden
“Willie’s God! Willie’s God! We Love Willie!”
IN THIS EXTRAORDINARY ORAL HISTORY, WILLIE NELSON’S FRIENDS, KIN, AND COLLABORATORS (JIMMY CARTER, EMMYLOU HARRIS, ROBERT REDFORD, MERLE HAGGARD, AND MANY MORE BIG NAMES) TELL THEIR FAVORITE STORIES ABOUT THE RED HEADED STRANGER.
music  willienelson  texas  countrymusic  oralhistory 
april 2013 by brendanmcfadden
Gotta Lubbock
LONG BEFORE AUSTIN WAS THE LIVE MUSIC CAPITAL OF THE WORLD, A COTTON-PICKIN' HIGH PLAINS CITY PUT TEXAS ON THE MAP. FROM BUDDY HOLLY TO JIMMIE DALE GILMORE, AN ORAL HISTORY OF THE STATE'S MOST STORIED SCENE.
music  texasmonthly  texas  lubbock  oralhistory 
april 2013 by brendanmcfadden
True West
Twenty-five years ago, Larry McMurtry published a novel called Lonesome Dove—and Texas hasn’t looked the same since.
lonesomedove  larrymcmurtry  texas  literature 
april 2013 by brendanmcfadden
The Mistress and the Narcotraficante
AN EXCLUSIVE EXCERPT FROM A UT PROFESSOR'S NEW BOOK ON THE JUÁREZ DRUG WARS
mexico  crime  juarez  texasmonthly  texas  drugwar 
april 2013 by brendanmcfadden
Texas Monthly Hires Full-Time Barbecue Editor
A Tireless Connoisseur of Texas Barbecue Gets Ready for the Main Course
nytimes  texasmonthly  food  texas  bbq 
march 2013 by brendanmcfadden
Houston Millionaires Clash Over Shadyside Mansion
Despite all the Tenth Commandment strictures to the contrary, coveting the mansion next door has led millionaire executive Tony Petrello to years of depositions and lawsuits.
texas  lawsuits  millionaires  houstonpress  houston 
october 2012 by brendanmcfadden
The Last Ride of the Polo Shirt Bandit
William Guess was his name—and it was prophetic. When he shot himself while surrounded by the police, he left unanswered the question that had stumped his pursuers: Why did an ordinary middle-class Texan turn into the most prolific bank robber in the state’s history?
texas  bankrobbery  crime  texasmonthly 
october 2012 by brendanmcfadden
Mothers, Sisters, Daughters, Wives
In 2011 the Legislature slashed family planning funds, passed a new sonogram law, and waged an all-out war on Planned Parenthood that has dramatically shifted the state’s public health priorities. In the eighteen months since then, the conflict has continued to simmer in the courts, on the campaign trail, and in at least one PR disaster. Meanwhile, what will happen to Texas women—and their fathers, brothers, sons, and husbands—remains very much unclear.
healthcare  abortion  texasmonthly  texas 
july 2012 by brendanmcfadden

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