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bwiese : pgp   6

xkcd: PGP
How to use PGP to verify that an email is authentic:
Look for this text at the top... if it's there, the email is probably fine.
pgp  humor  gpg  email 
march 2019 by bwiese
I'm giving up on PGP
Mostly I'll use Signal or WhatsApp, which offer vastly better endpoint security on iOS, ephemerality, and smoother key rotation.

If you need to securely contact me, your best bet is to DM me asking for my Signal number. If needed we can decide an appropriate way to compare fingerprints.

If we meet in person and need to setup a secure channel, we will just exchange a secret passphrase to use with what's most appropriate: OTR, Pond, Ricochet.

If it turns out we really need PGP, we will setup some ad-hoc keys, more à-la-Operational PGP. Same for any signed releases or canaries I might maintain in the future.

To exchange files, we will negotiate Magic Wormhole, OnionShare, or ad-hoc PGP keys over the secure channel we already have. The point is not to avoid the gpg tool, but the PGP key management model.

If you really need to cold-contact me, I might maintain a Keybase key, but no promises. I like rooting trust in your social profiles better since it makes key rotation much more natural, and is probably how most people know me anyway.

I'm also not dropping YubiKeys. I'm very happy about my new YubiKey 4 with touch-to-operate, which I use for SSH keys, password storage and machine bootstrap. But these things are 100% under my control.
yubikey  pgp  crypto  privacy  whatsapp  signal 
december 2018 by bwiese
In Apple Mail, There’s No Protecting PGP-Encrypted Messages
In a nutshell, the EFAIL attack works like this: First, the attacker needs a copy of a message that’s encrypted to your public key. They could get this by hacking your email account, hacking your email server, compelling your email provider to hand it over with a warrant, intercepting it while spying on the internet, or other ways. PGP was specifically designed to protect against this — the promise of PGP is that even attackers with copies of your encrypted messages can’t decrypt them, only you can. When you receive an email that’s encrypted to your public key, your email client automatically uses your secret key to decrypt it so that you can read it. The EFAIL researchers discovered that they could craft a special email that secretly includes a stolen encrypted message within it, and then send it to you. When you receive the malicious email, your email client uses your secret key to automatically decrypt the pilfered message within the malicious email, and then sends a decrypted copy of the stolen message back to the attacker — for example, through a web request to load an image into the email.
efail  encryption  pgp  gpg  email  cybersecurity 
june 2018 by bwiese
New PGP Encryption Exploits Are Being Discovered Almost Every Other Day
Gizmodo was alerted to flaws discovered as recently as Wednesday that currently impact multiple PGP implementations, including Enigmail (Thunderbird) and GPGTools (Apple Mail)—the technical details of which are withheld here while the appropriate developers are contacted and given time to address them.

“It wasn’t a case of having to write software to do this. You could literally just cut and paste what they said in the paper and use it. The video of how easy it was to use, that was the thing that clinched it for me—sitting and watching a video of someone just clicking a few buttons and being able to exfiltrate data.”

“It’s sometimes better to [temporarily] disable encryption (or decrypt in the terminal) than to have your whole past communication at stake.”
pgp  gpg  cybersecurity  crypto  encryption  efail  vulnerability 
june 2018 by bwiese
It has been a bad week for encrypted messaging and it’s only Wednesday | Ars Technica
Monday brought word of decade-old flaws that might reveal the contents of PGP- and S/MIME-encrypted emails. Some of the worst flaws resided in email clients such as Thunderbird and Apple Mail, and they offer a golden opportunity to attackers who have already intercepted previously sent messages. By embedding the intercepted ciphertext in invisible parts of a new message sent to a sender or receiver of the original email, attackers can force the client to leak the corresponding plaintext. Thunderbird and Mail have yet to be patched, although the Thunderbird flaw has been mitigated by an update published Wednesday in the Enigmail GPG plugin.
cybersecurity  encryption  pgp  signal  email  javascript  crypto 
may 2018 by bwiese
Schneier on Security: Breaking Hard-Disk Encryption
The newly announced ElcomSoft Forensic Disk Decryptor can decrypt BitLocker, PGP, and TrueCrypt. And it's only $300

Elcomsoft Forensic Disk Decryptor acquires the necessary decryption keys by analyzing memory dumps and/or hibernation files obtained from the target PC. You'll thus need to get a memory dump from a running PC (locked or unlocked) with encrypted volumes mounted, via a standard forensic product or via a FireWire attack. Alternatively, decryption keys can also be derived from hibernation files if a target PC is turned off.

t AccessData doing the same thing in 2007: And PRTK breaks more than 50 percent of passwords from this dictionary alone.
crypto  truecrypt  pgp  bitlocker  security  schneier  passwords  forensics 
january 2013 by bwiese

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