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charlesarthur : migration   4

Polish charity gets huge phone bill thanks to stork • BBC News
<p>According to official broadcaster Radio Poland, the environmental EcoLogic Group placed a tracker on the back of a white stork last year to track the bird's migratory habits.

It travelled some 3,700 miles (6,000kms), and was traced to the Blue Nile Valley in eastern Sudan before the charity lost contact.

EcoLogic told the Super Express newspaper that somebody found the tracker in Sudan, removed the sim card and put it in their own phone, where they then racked up 20 hours' worth of phone calls.
Radio Poland says that the organisation has received a phone bill of over 10,000 Polish zloty ($2,700; £2,064), which it will have to pay.</p>


This is why you put a passcode on the SIM, Wilkins.
bird  sim  fraud  stork  migration 
july 2018 by charlesarthur
Mesmerizing migration: watch 118 bird species migrate across a map of the western hemisphere » All About Birds
Pat Leonard:
<p>For the first time, scientists at the Cornell Lab of Ornithology have documented migratory movements of bird populations spanning the entire year for 118 species throughout the Western Hemisphere. The study finds broad similarity in the routes used by specific groups of species—vividly demonstrated by animated maps showing patterns of movement across the annual cycle.</p>


<img src="https://files.allaboutbirds.net/wp-content/uploads/2016/01/la-sorte-map-118-spp-64-725.gif" width="100%" />

There's also a version <a href="https://www.allaboutbirds.org/mesmerizing-migration-map-which-species-is-which/">showing which species is which</a>.
maps  migration  science 
january 2016 by charlesarthur
A 21st-century migrant’s essentials: food, shelter, smartphone » The New York Times
Matthew Brunwasser:
The tens of thousands of migrants who have flooded into the Balkans in recent weeks need food, water and shelter, just like the millions displaced by war the world over. But there is also one other thing they swear they cannot live without: a smartphone charging station.

“Every time I go to a new country, I buy a SIM card and activate the Internet and download the map to locate myself,” Osama Aljasem, a 32-year-old music teacher from Deir al-Zour, Syria, explained as he sat on a broken park bench in Belgrade, staring at his smartphone and plotting his next move into northern Europe.

“I would never have been able to arrive at my destination without my smartphone,” he added. “I get stressed out when the battery even starts to get low.”


Not a thing one would have been likely to forecast even five years ago. GPS and WhatsApp are now essential.
migration  smartphone 
august 2015 by charlesarthur
I've given up on Windows Phone >> The Verge
Tom Warren is The Verge's Microsoft correspondent; he started Winrumors.com (which is part of how he got the job at The Verge). He's been using Windows Phone since 2010, along with other platforms. Now he's going to stick with an iPhone 6:
I've always been slightly frustrated at the lack of Windows Phone apps, but as the gaps have been gradually filled, a new frustration has emerged: dead apps. Developers might be creating more and more Windows Phone apps, but the top ones are often left untouched with few updates or new features. That's a big problem for apps like Twitter that are regularly updated on iOS and Android with features that never make it to Windows Phone. My frustration boiled over during the World Cup this year, as Twitter lit up with people talking about the matches. I felt left out using the official Windows Phone Twitter app because it didn't have a special World Cup section that curated great and entertaining tweets, or country flags for hashtags.

That same sense of missing out extends elsewhere with Windows Phone. I rely on apps like Dark Sky on iPhone to give me a weather warning when it's about to rain, or Slack and Trello to communicate with colleagues at The Verge. All three aren't available on Windows Phone, and Dark Sky is particularly useful when you're at a bar and it pings you a notification to let you know it's going to rain in your location for the next 30 minutes. It lets you decide whether to grab another beer (tip: always grab another beer) or risk getting wet. It's an essential app to me personally, and it's a good example of how apps are changing the world.
windowsphone  migration 
december 2014 by charlesarthur

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