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dirtystylus : communication   60

Slack rules of life | Seth's Blog
Create a new channel for every project.

Invite the right people to join the channel to work on it.

Every project has a beginning, and it has an ending as well. Don’t start a channel if you’re not prepared to end it.

When a project isn’t helping you reach your longer-term goals, leave the channel.

Direct messages demand clarity and care. And teams do better when communication is shared.

Remember that your reputation moves with you, from channel to channel.

Emotions are real, but emojis can be a distraction.
slack  teamwork  communication  techculture 
20 days ago by dirtystylus
Gen Z’s relationship with tech: They don’t want to be always reachable - Vox
Males and females of Generation Z do tend to differ from one another in one important way: optimism about tech. Gen Z women are markedly less likely than other generations and less likely than their male peers to be optimistic about technology’s impact on society.

They’re also more worried than other groups about online safety and security and their personal information “getting into the wrong hands.”
culture  socialmedia  privacy  communication  genz 
october 2019 by dirtystylus
Lindsey Kopacz (she/her) on Twitter: "There's a huge difference between being nice and being kind. Calling people out (because you know they can be better): Kind Educating people in the way they prefer because it makes them feel better about the harm they
There's a huge difference between being nice and being kind.

Calling people out (because you know they can be better): Kind

Educating people in the way they prefer because it makes them feel better about the harm they caused:
Nice
whiteness  communication 
september 2019 by dirtystylus
Myleik Teele on Twitter: "ATTENTION TO DETAIL. Here are some things I've done over the years to become super thorough and incredibly detail oriented. A THREAD (I think)."
ATTENTION TO DETAIL. Here are some things I've done over the years to become super thorough and incredibly detail oriented. A THREAD (I think).

1. PICK UP THE PHONE: Too many of us rely on email and text to communicate. I use that as the starting point. If we've got business and you send an email, I'm scheduling a call. This cuts down on 80% of the misunderstandings.
1a. Scheduling phone calls gives you a sense of the person's style and tone. By speaking to them you'll instantly know what they mean when they email. You'll also find out what preferences work for them AND people ALWAYS FORGET to say SOMETHING in the email. THIS IS A FACT.
2. DOUBLE CHECK EVERYTHING: You can do this super quick. If there's an address, give it a quick Google and make sure the company hasn't moved. If you're unsure about the location, call and ask for what you need. No silly questions. You're in it to win it.
3. ASSUME THE WORST: I know. I hate doing this but you have to assume everything is going to fall apart. Start running some back up plans in the back of your mind so that you can move quickly. If you finish the task quickly, spend a few minutes on a back up plan.
4. CONFIRM EVERYTHING: If you schedule something for next week, CONFIRM it the day before. PEOPLE FORGET.
5. KEEP A LIST OF THINGS YOU MAY NEED SOME DAY: I keep an excessive amount of notes on my phone for all kinds of things and I type up a couple of key words so that I can quickly search them.
6. GET ORGANIZED + STAY ORGANIZED: Make a LIST. DATE the list. Use the LIST. Cross off the LIST. KEEP THE LIST. I used to always look back on old lists. I'd go back to the month and there it was.
7. GET GANGSTER WITH YOUR CALENDAR: The calendar is by far my best friend. I LIVE by the calendar. If it's not on the calendar, it's not happening.
8. IMMEDIATELY APOLOGIZE: If you mess up. Admit it. Correct it. Do your BEST not to let it happen again.
9. UNDERSTAND THE ORDER: Too many of us have our egos tied up in the work. When I'm working for a client, my JOB is to ensure the client is happy vs. trying to convince them that I'm right.
10. KEEP LEARNING: Most of being intimidated is about not KNOWING. Read. Take classes. Take courses. Ask around.
11. KEEP A DIVERSE NETWORK: I can get to and find out ANYTHING because of my network. Don't get obsessed with trying to hang around the same type of people. You win when you can make a phone call and things happen.
twitterthread  organization  communication  career  by:myleikteele 
september 2019 by dirtystylus
Sarah Mei on Twitter: "All code is optimized. The difference is in what it’s optimized _for_."
All code is optimized. The difference is in what it’s optimized _for_.
Runtime speed is one thing you can optimize for, but it’s much more common to optimize for other types of speed. The three I most commonly see:
- speed of shipping the code
- speed of onboarding new devs
- speed of making changes after onboarding
by:sarahmei  twitterthread  codearchitecture  onboarding  communication 
october 2018 by dirtystylus
Do leadership, don’t learn it. – Matthew Cook – Medium
Get people talking. Collaboration can’t truly happen if your team is silo-ed, and becoming the conduit for that collaboration is a key element of leading. The ability to understand who’s not talking, whether it’s necessary that they do talk, and then facilitating the conversation is invaluable.

Teach your teammates. Many people balk at this one: If I’m not the leader and don’t have the most experience, what business do I have teaching other teammates? Shouldn’t someone else do that? No! Teaching isn’t only about the transfer of information from one person who knows a lot to another person who doesn’t. It’s about research, communication skill, encapsulating and contextualizing information for others, and then effort — putting in the time to bring someone else along. In fact, teaching others is a proven way to become better, yourself.
teamwork  leadership  communication  agile  management  mentoring 
june 2018 by dirtystylus
18F Handbook - How to say no
Here’s one I pulled together after becoming a supervisor: a quick guide to saying no to all-the-things:
communication  teamwork  via:nicoleslaw  18f 
december 2016 by dirtystylus
How to Be Polite — The Message — Medium
When you are at a party and are thrust into conversation with someone, see how long you can hold off before talking about what they do for a living. And when that painful lull arrives, be the master of it. I have come to revel in that agonizing first pause, because I know that I can push a conversation through. Just ask the other person what they do, and right after they tell you, say: “Wow. That sounds hard.”
politeness  communication 
august 2014 by dirtystylus
Log In - The New York Times
Great piece on how "groupthink" and open plan work spaces decrease productivity w/ introverts & creatives.
openplanoffice  office  workculture  communication 
january 2012 by dirtystylus

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