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Americans favor getting news on mobile devices over desktops and laptops | Pew Research Center
Americans continue to be more likely to get news through mobile devices than through desktop or laptop computers. Roughly six-in-ten U.S. adults (57%) often get news this way, compared with 30% who often do so on a desktop or laptop computer, according to a Pew Research Center survey.

The share of Americans who often get news on a mobile device is more than double the 21% who did so in 2013, the first time we asked this question. At the same time, the portion of Americans who often get news on a desktop or laptop computer has remained relatively stable during this period.
mobilefirst  contentstrategy  data  analytics  pewresearch 
november 2019 by dirtystylus
Emily Dust Nimsakont on Twitter: "… "
Two-shot with yelling woman on left:

You can just search full text!

Smudge the Cat on right:

Metadata
meme  cat  meme:smudgethecat  contentstrategy  search 
november 2019 by dirtystylus
Kontra on Twitter: "I continue to be flabbergasted by NYTimes's CMS/article placement "algorithms". I mean, I'll loan the money if you need to hire a SE/CS college intern with passing knowledge of tf-idf. Such persistent lack of care all over.… https://
I continue to be flabbergasted by NYTimes's CMS/article placement "algorithms".

I mean, I'll loan the money if you need to hire a SE/CS college intern with passing knowledge of tf-idf. Such persistent lack of care all over.
tfidf  contentstrategy  relatedcontent  cms 
november 2019 by dirtystylus
tf–idf - Wikipedia
In information retrieval, tf–idf or TFIDF, short for term frequency–inverse document frequency, is a numerical statistic that is intended to reflect how important a word is to a document in a collection or corpus.[1] It is often used as a weighting factor in searches of information retrieval, text mining, and user modeling. The tf–idf value increases proportionally to the number of times a word appears in the document and is offset by the number of documents in the corpus that contain the word, which helps to adjust for the fact that some words appear more frequently in general. tf–idf is one of the most popular term-weighting schemes today; 83% of text-based recommender systems in digital libraries use tf–idf.[2]

Variations of the tf–idf weighting scheme are often used by search engines as a central tool in scoring and ranking a document's relevance given a user query. tf–idf can be successfully used for stop-words filtering in various subject fields, including text summarization and classification.

One of the simplest ranking functions is computed by summing the tf–idf for each query term; many more sophisticated ranking functions are variants of this simple model.
tfidf  contentstrategy  relatedcontent  cms 
november 2019 by dirtystylus
Mark Boulton on Twitter: "Whenever I'm designing editorial content, I always design for worse case scenario: - Terrible images (or no images) - Poorly written, long headlines - Really long paragraphs with no links - Overwhelming inappropriate advertising
Whenever I'm designing editorial content, I always design for worse case scenario:
- Terrible images (or no images)
- Poorly written, long headlines
- Really long paragraphs with no links
- Overwhelming inappropriate advertising
Because, you can bet, that's how it will end up.

https://twitter.com/markboulton/status/1195357923628724229

So, if you can make poor content meet the baseline: accessible (URL, a11y), readable (typography, typesetting), navigable (IA). Then you're mostly there. Everything else is an enhancement.
editorialdesign  contentstrategy  webdesign  by:markboulton 
november 2019 by dirtystylus
An Introduction to Content Ecosystem Maps
Tell me if any of these sound familiar:

“I’m just trying to get my head around what all we’re doing with content.”
“I don’t know how many domains we have.”
“Our content teams are all in silos and nobody knows what anybody else is doing.”
“There’s so much happening with content and we’re not sure where to even start.”
If so, consider creating a content ecosystem map. Content ecosystem maps are my preferred tool for understanding and documenting an organization’s content reality. They can be quick little diagrams made in an afternoon or part of a robust, multi-week discovery and documentation process.
contentstrategy  by:scottkubie  via:kristinahalvorson  contentecosystemmap  content 
september 2019 by dirtystylus
There is no magic — you’ve got this » Nieman Journalism Lab
We know the best practices and what the tools are. It’s about the day-to-day doing, the actions and behaviors driven by your values that become good habits that become the foundations of a sustainable business.
journalism  focus  contentstrategy 
january 2019 by dirtystylus
I Can’t Quit Content First Design – Prototypr
I find that by planning the goals of the project and aligning the content around the goals, everything from the color choice to the photography is no longer artistic guesses, but strategic, creative decisions that align with goals and desired outcomes.
contentstrategy  content  contentfirst  design  via:karenmcgrane 
september 2018 by dirtystylus
“Content & Display Patterns,” an article by Dan Mall
Ten projects of this type along, I feel like I’m getting the hang of what to look for and how to design this way. For those that are a bit newer though, one of the exercises I often turn to when I’m having trouble visualizing a content workflow is to think about how my boss, my client, or I would manage and maintain the content. I do that by designing a fake CMS for the piece I’m working on.
webdev  designpatterns  design  webdesign  via:danielmall  content  contentstrategy  styleguide  workflow  teamwork 
october 2016 by dirtystylus
Rethinking What’s On: Online events listings at National Museums Scotland | National Museums Scotland Blog
Organisations inevitably have competing priorities when it comes to their event programmes. ENO for example has a beautiful what’s on section featuring glossy images of the season’s big hitters. In fact, their What’s On page is essentially the same as the homepage. A similar approach may not work for a small museum with a broader range of free events (although the concept of “selling” key messages/events is always important);
museum  planning  ux  contentstrategy  via:sarapasch 
september 2016 by dirtystylus
Content in a Zombie Apocalypse | Karen McGrane
Thanks everyone at for turning up early for my Zombie Apocalypse talk. Slides, video, and transcript here:
talk  contentstrategy  zombiedevices  karenmcgrane 
may 2015 by dirtystylus
There’s No Such Thing As Responsive Content – Sparksheet
This is not the case with content. When I consume content, regardless of device, my top task is reading.

The goal of content is experience – the experience of learning and enriching my mind. Reading holds an intrinsic value. An app is instrumental; I want to complete the task as quickly and efficiently as possible. If you cut out content you take away from my experience of reading.
contentstrategy  responsivecontent  rwd 
july 2013 by dirtystylus
Words
What do you have to say? If you don't know, there's not much use in adding all that other cruft. Just start with one page, with a single focus. Write it and publish it, and then iterate on that. Every time you're about to add something, ask yourself: does this help me communicate better? Will that additional styling, image, or hyperlink give my audience more understanding? If the answer's "no", don't add it.
essay  writing  webdesign  contentstrategy 
june 2013 by dirtystylus
So You're Going To Start A Huge New Web Project | CSS-Tricks
I was asked this past week to consult for a company embarking on a huge new website redesign. I thought I'd write up some thoughts that I would share with anyone in that position.
css  webdesign  workflow  contentstrategy  planning 
december 2012 by dirtystylus

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