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dirtystylus : education   84

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Gifted testing disappointment: parenting advice from Care and Feeding.
My husband and I recently had our son, who is in first grade, tested for the gifted program at his school. I will admit that it was mostly motivated partially by my vanity and peer-pressure from friends who urged us to give it a go. (I also find “gifted” to be a problematic term and a relic of a narrow perspective on learning and talent that should be retired.) And, to be frank, I honestly don’t think he is gifted. Funny, smart, cutely irreverent? Yes! But not talented academically per se.

Well, he did not get in. It’s fine. We barely mentioned it to him, and he just thought he was pulled out for testing that other kids got as well. If my son asks why he doesn’t get to go on the bus to the gifted school each Monday, what should I say? I should also say that his 10-year-old brother has been in the program since he was in first grade, and I worry about him feeling less than and left out.
education  children 
22 hours ago by dirtystylus
Ana Lorena Fabrega on Twitter: "I’m confused. How did we conclude that the best way to prepare kids for the future is to cluster them into a setting where they are organized by age, into grades, and forced to learn the same things, at the same time and
I’m confused.

How did we conclude that the best way to prepare kids for the future is to cluster them into a setting where they are organized by age, into grades, and forced to learn the same things, at the same time and pace, 7 hours a day, 5 days a week, for 12 + years?

Huh?
education  children 
13 days ago by dirtystylus
The Sum of Small Things | Princeton University Press
In today’s world, the leisure class has been replaced by a new elite. Highly educated and defined by cultural capital rather than income bracket, these individuals earnestly buy organic, carry canvas tote bags, and breast-feed their babies. They care about discreet, inconspicuous consumption—like eating free-range chicken and heirloom tomatoes, wearing organic cotton shirts and TOMS shoes, and listening to the latest podcast. They use their purchasing power to hire nannies and housekeepers, to cultivate their children’s growth, and to practice yoga and Pilates. In The Sum of Small Things, Elizabeth Currid-Halkett dubs this new elite “the aspirational class” and discusses how, through deft decisions about education, health, parenting, and retirement, they reproduce wealth and upward mobility, deepening the ever-wider class divide. With a rich narrative and extensive interviews and research, The Sum of Small Things illustrates how cultural capital leads to lifestyle shifts and examines what these changes will mean for everyone.
class  culture  education  parenting  privilege 
5 weeks ago by dirtystylus
Can Everyone Be Excellent? - Alfie Kohn
But boy, do we love to rank. Worse, we create artificial scarcity such as awards — distinctions manufactured out of thin air specifically so that some cannot get them. Every contest involves the invention of a desired status where none existed before and none needs to exist. This creates an adversarial mentality that makes productive collaboration less likely, encourages gaming the system, and leads all concerned to focus not on meaningful improvement but on trying to outdo (and perhaps undermine) everyone else.

Most of all, it encourages the false belief that excellence or success itself is a zero-sum game. The sociologist Philip Slater once remarked that the manufacture of scarcity is the principal activity of American culture. Indeed, he added, many people “find it difficult to enjoy anything they themselves have unless they can be sure that there are people to whom this pleasure is denied.”
education  parenting  politics  mediocrity  culture  via:susanjrobertson 
september 2019 by dirtystylus
The College Dropout Crisis
For too long, she added, university leaders have been distracted and have been chasing prestige and rankings, rather than getting better at helping students succeed.
via:rogre  education  highered  class  latecapitalism  college 
may 2019 by dirtystylus
Student Debt Is Dragging A Whole Generation Down
“I am so far in debt that will never go away,” she told me, “and all those things people do in life — marriage, travel, homes, a career, not living with your elderly mom who you don’t get along with in a one-bedroom apartment, not being scared all the time — will never come my way. I miss insurance. I have been to the dentist once in 15 years. I’m pretty sure that if I ever get diagnosed with cancer, I’ll just let it take me. What could I do? I couldn’t afford to fight it.”
debt  highered  college  millenials  education  class  money 
may 2019 by dirtystylus
Pa. school districts say later start times are boosting grades : Education : WHYY
He estimates the shift will cost $300,000 for additional transportation needs, including rescheduling bus routes so private school students can still get to school on time.
middleschool  highschool  education  pennsylvania  school  infrastructure  transportation 
january 2019 by dirtystylus
Roberto Greco on Twitter: "“We should all remind ourselves that being kind is not helping people, but making them feel included in everything we do.” —fourth grader"
“We should all remind ourselves that being kind is not helping people, but making them feel included in everything we do.” —fourth grader
inclusion  education  kindness  via:rogre 
november 2016 by dirtystylus
Can students who are constantly on their devices actually learn? | Aeon Essays
A study from Princeton University shows that we process information better when taking notes by hand because writing is slower than typing (an argument often spun in favour of laptops), which helps students learn and retain the material. Similarly, people better comprehend what they’re reading if it’s on paper rather than on the screen. In a study from the University of Stavanger in Norway, readers on Kindle struggled to remember plot details in comparison with those who read printed books, perhaps because the physical act of turning the pages helps our memories encode the words.
education  learning  notetaking  memory  distraction 
september 2016 by dirtystylus
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