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dirtystylus : gender   34

The long history of the hand-washing gender gap.
Women were always at the center of hygiene improvement efforts. The public health workers who went to tenements and farms to preach this “gospel of germs” as visiting nurses, social workers, and home economists were often women. And under this new way of thinking, mothers were supposed to be the role models for the entire family—teaching hand-washing, stopping men from spitting in the house, and keeping anyone from kissing their babies. The health department in Newark, New Jersey, sent a bib to every baby born in the city in 1929 that had the legend “I don’t want to be sick, please do not kiss me.” (This is a gift I suspect some contemporary parents would appreciate in this year of bad flu.)

The job of hygiene gatekeeper came somewhat naturally to Victorian women and their daughters, who were used to the expectation that they’d be the moral instructors of their households, but it could still be an unpleasant one. Tomes read correspondence between home economists and women who wrote that older family members mocked them for their new ideas, and refused to stop sharing spoons and plates with their babies or chewing bites of food before giving them to the infants. “Spitting also became a useful tactic for men to annoy hygiene-conscious ladies,” Tomes wrote, even after a full decade of anti-tuberculosis crusaders exhorting men to stop expectorating on the street, on public transport, and even (shudder) inside the home.
via:jordan  history  health  coronavirus  gender  genderroles  equity 
9 days ago by dirtystylus
Amaryah S. Armstrong on Twitter: "I always laugh when ppl talk abt being gay isn't a choice bc why would you choose it, but have these ppl looked at heterosexuality lately? All the work that goes into compulsory heterosexuality makes sense bc how else wou
I always laugh when ppl talk abt being gay isn't a choice bc why would you choose it, but have these ppl looked at heterosexuality lately? All the work that goes into compulsory heterosexuality makes sense bc how else would you get ppl to be straight? lmaoooo
sexuality  gender  genderroles  lgbtq 
september 2019 by dirtystylus
bletchley punk on Twitter: "*attends event with 100+ women* ME: ugh I want to shave my head *sits in meeting where everyone is called "guys"* ME: ugh I want to paint my nails"
*attends event with 100+ women*
ME: ugh I want to shave my head
*sits in meeting where everyone is called "guys"*
ME: ugh I want to paint my nails
for people saying "both," yes of course

it's not that I can't do both, it's that both are efforts to be properly Seen
there's this Thing I keep running into, at the intersection of the tech industry and gender

I think it's mostly impactful in cultures where your job is a big part of who you are
I go to women in tech events and, invariably, I'm either the only woman or possibly one of two women who works in the infra space

most other women work in frontend or management or (sometimes) backend services
the number of women I know, in my local community, who do what I do? that is, infra and systems engineering and C and assembly and security and networking?

zero
I know a few from the Internet and some I've met in person!

but still, very very few
and because What We Do is so entwined with Who We Are, there's this odd...gendering that happens

tech roles have been gendered by history (a whole other discussion) but in turn I'm seeing/feeling Gender Defined By Tech Role
I attend events for women and none of them do what I do

and so I feel like I don't belong

and I wonder...am I not a woman?
because all these women write JS or manage teams and have career paths that look similar

and mine doesn't
and WHY aren't there more women like me? because they're not wanted! there's no in-roads. no retention. no encouragement. if you make it in, you're either held at arm's length or pushed out altogether.

I know this

and yet
it's far easier to feel awkward at WIT events and think "I feel awkward because I'm not a woman" than it is to think "I feel awkward because women like me are systematically culled"
because the latter part is far lonelier
because the latter part acknowledges that I will always be a bit lonely and a bit behind, compared to my WIT friends
gender  womenintech  techculture  misogyny  career  infrastructure  by:alicegoldfuss  twitterthread 
june 2019 by dirtystylus
Metafoundry 30: Confusion Matrices
Just as many English words are default male (unmarked), with a changed ending to connote female (marked; think 'actor' vs 'actress'), she argued that men's dress can be unmarked but women's dress is always marked. That is, there are decisions that men make about what they wear that are defaults, that aren’t even seen as a decision. In contrast, every decision that a woman makes about what she wears—heels vs, flats, pants vs, skirts, the length of a skirt and the height of a neckline, haircuts, jewelry—is freighted with cultural baggage. Take makeup. Especially in professional settings, for a woman, not wearing makeup is a noticeable, and notable, decision: marked. But for a man, not wearing makeup is not a decision—nobody notices when men aren't wearing makeup: unmarked. (Of course, a man wearing makeup is very marked indeed.)
clothing  gender  politics  culture  by:debchachra  women  misogyny 
october 2018 by dirtystylus
Many Ways to Be a Girl, but One Way to Be a Boy: The New Gender Rules
In a new poll, girls say they feel empowered, except when it comes to being judged on how they look. Boys still feel they have to be strong, athletic and stoic.
gender  teens  children  society 
september 2018 by dirtystylus

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