recentpopularlog in

dirtystylus : journalism   53

The Functional Art: An Introduction to Information Graphics and Visualization: The most-read story ever published by the Washington Post online is a visualization (and other reasons why your organization should invest in a graphics team)
Poynter informs that the most-read piece ever published in the Washington Post's website is a visualization, the now famous coronavirus simulator, by Harry Stevens.

Poynter's story is very good; see also this tweet by WaPo's media columnist Paul Farhi, confirming the news.

Here are a few more factoids for you, without trying to be exhaustive:

In 2013 the most-read story in The New York Times online was the dialect map, How Y’all, Youse, and You Guys Talk, which still is “one of the most popular in The Times’s digital history.”

ProPublica's Scott Klein has just told me that “about half of our traffic that goes to journalism on our site is to news apps,” which are databases and visualizations. Back in 2010, the Texas Tribune wrote that their applications account for “a third of the site's overall traffic.”

The Financial Times's graphs and maps about the coronavirus are becoming wildly popular, and for good reason: they are excellent, overall.

I predict that the flatten-the-curve visual explanation—read about it here and here—will become the most iconic image of 2020, and one of the most influential graphics ever made.

I could go on an on.

It's puzzling to me, then, that so many organizations—not just news organizations—are reluctant to invest in a large data, visualization, and infographics team, or to give it the power, resources, and autonomy it needs to thrive. What are you thinking?

(Also, Pulitzer Prize Board, it's about time to create a category for news applications, visualizations, and infographics, don't you think?)
dataviz  journalism  data  washingtonpost 
15 days ago by dirtystylus
“Amusing Ourselves to Death”: News media and the public’s desire to be entertained vs. its need to be informed | Media Matters for America
Journalism cannot serve its role as an institutional check on the powerful if it is driven by a need to maximize profit. The press can’t be afraid to be boring, but changes in the industry’s economic landscape over the past 20 years show what happens if it can’t keep our attention.
journalism  tv  media  politics  neilpostman  entertainment  whatnow  civics 
6 weeks ago by dirtystylus
There is no magic — you’ve got this » Nieman Journalism Lab
We know the best practices and what the tools are. It’s about the day-to-day doing, the actions and behaviors driven by your values that become good habits that become the foundations of a sustainable business.
journalism  focus  contentstrategy 
january 2019 by dirtystylus
derrick has started yet another project on Twitter: "Almost every Times reader we talked to in our user research going back since I started (3 years) told us they didn’t find video the right medium for learning about the news. That’s a small sample si
Almost every Times reader we talked to in our user research going back since I started (3 years) told us they didn’t find video the right medium for learning about the news. That’s a small sample size and prob more indicative of the Times audience, but it was noticeable.
nyt  journalism  video  pivottovideo  analytics  facebook 
october 2018 by dirtystylus
Chris Conroy on Twitter: "If you missed it: today it was confirmed that Facebook massively & knowingly inflated its video-view statistics, which had the DIRECT consequence of 90% of media orgs firing writers in favor of expensive video producers, who
If you missed it: today it was confirmed that Facebook massively & knowingly inflated its video-view statistics, which had the DIRECT consequence of 90% of media orgs firing writers in favor of expensive video producers, who also got fired when it turned out video was worthless
facebook  analytics  video  journalism  pivottovideo 
october 2018 by dirtystylus

Copy this bookmark:





to read