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dirtystylus : openweb   18

Naming Progressive Web Apps | fberriman
I keep seeing folks (developers) getting all smart-ass saying they should have been PW “Sites” not “Apps” but I just want to put on the record that it doesn’t matter. The name isn’t for you and worrying about it is distraction from just building things that work better for everyone. The name is for your boss, for your investor, for your marketeer. It’s a way for you to keep making things on the open web, even those things that look really “app-y” and your company wants to actually make as a native app, 3 times over. They don’t want you to make websites anymore, but you still can if you’re sneaky, if you tell them it’s what they think they want.
pwa  progressivewebapp  openweb  by:phae  webdev  performance  webperf 
june 2017 by dirtystylus
Refreshing The Verge: no platform like home - The Verge
Perhaps ironically, we’ve found that the best way to create that resiliency is by harking back to the web principle of progressive enhancement: each story created in Chorus begins as a platform-neutral collection of text, images, and video. That foundation ensures that we can publish that story as easily to our own platform as to, say, AMP or Apple News, and be confident that our audience will experience that story in a way that fits whichever platform they are using. On our own platform, we’re then free to enhance up, adding stylistic or experiential flairs that elevate the experience of the story. This practice — which I refer to unoriginally as progressively enhanced storytelling — also has the added benefit of helping us make our content more accessible to more kinds of users, especially those with disabilities. (It wouldn’t be inaccurate to consider speaking browsers one among the many platforms we must publish to.)
orbitalcontent  publishing  cms  via:aworkinglibrary  voxproduct  progressiveenhancement  openweb  googleamp  performance  video  editorialdesign 
october 2016 by dirtystylus
The Web is not Poor Man’s Native | in progress
The web, by contrast, excels at just-in-time interaction, as it IS hassle-free. But it’s a natural progression to enable users to move that onto their home screen, and let them get notifications and other engagement features if they so desire. This is still the web, though – I don’t need to have the NYT app open just to read the article at a link I followed. There are also app-like behaviors you may want occasionally too, e.g. a “what’s near me?” app. There’s an assumption that app-like behaviors demand native, and that the web is for documents.
openweb  webvsnative  webdev  extensibleweb 
june 2015 by dirtystylus
Changing culture | susan jean robertson
Some quickly written, rambling thoughts about the performance discussion happening
openweb  instantarticles  facebook  webdev  performance 
may 2015 by dirtystylus
Apps versus the web — Benedict Evans
you should have a website that works well on mobile regardless of whether you also have an app, and that site should give your complete proposition, since that of course is where links from Google and Facebook will take people. Too many companies present the potential customer with a website that says 'screw you, install our app', and then an app store page that says 'screw you, install our app', and then a first-run screen that says 'screw you, create an account/sign in with Facebook'. You do have to earn an install, I think.
openweb  webdev  facebook  instantarticles  app  webvsnative 
may 2015 by dirtystylus
Adactio: Journal—Hope
“I would much rather an imperfect open system to a perfect proprietary one.”

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adactio  openweb 
april 2015 by dirtystylus

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