recentpopularlog in

dirtystylus : workculture   103

« earlier  
Mekka Okereke on Twitter: "If you: 1. Work at a company that has written performance reviews 2. Care about making that review process as equitable as possible 3. Manage people Here's a free tip for you, in the area of language used in reviews..."
If you:
1. Work at a company that has written performance reviews
2. Care about making that review process as equitable as possible
3. Manage people

Here's a free tip for you, in the area of language used in reviews...
Imagine collecting all of the text used in upcoming performance reviews, for everyone on your team. All peer feedback, your assessment, everything.

Then imagine creating a map of word frequencies used, for each person on your team.
If N counts make sense, and you have folks' permission, imagine inspecting frequency maps sliced by different interesting dimensions.

What are the dude-iest words?

What are the blackest words?

Is the language used to describe the work of various cohorts... different?
More importantly, do you want the same language to be used to describe the same work?

This isn't about trying to change your worldview. This is about *you* confirming to *yourself* that the world on your team really is as you want it to be.
One level deeper...

Imagine making a similar map for feedback that *you* have given to your peers.

Do you describe the work of your peers differently based on their cohort? Again, more importantly, do you want to? Or do you want to use the same language to describe work?
What if, for example, you noticed that you were much more likely to use the words, "communication" or "presence" when you were giving feedback about non-US born co-workers?

How would you convince yourself (or disprove!) that in your specific context, that this is OK?
Even deeper. N-grams.

"assertive" vs "too assertive"

"ready" vs "not ready for"

"launched" vs "helped launch"

"works really hard"

"needs to"

"not approachable"

"not helpful"

"show initiative"

"lacks complexity"

"she didn't"
management  leadership  workculture  twitterthread  inclusion  bias  sexism 
5 weeks ago by dirtystylus
LARPing your job
The problem, then, is that “knowledge work” rarely fits the standard, 40-hour-a-week capitalist paradigm. In “traditional” jobs, 40 hours means 40 hours of service (childcare, elder care, waiting tables, cleaning streets, making deliveries) or 40 hours of production (stamping metal, performing quality control, flipping boards, framing houses). If you want to produce 1000 widgets, you can figure out how many hours it takes to produce each widget, and how many employees you need to pay to put in those hours.

This falls apart with knowledge work. How many hours does it take to write a sermon, to figure out a legal strategy, to edit a book or write a piece of music? There’s the visible labor (the amount of time you sit at the desk, typing words that actually end up in your piece) and the invisible labor (the amount of time you spend thinking about it, the amount of paragraphs that get erased, the number of interviews you do that never make their way into the final piece). Lawyers have figured out a way to charge for the invisible labor by turning it into “billable hours,” incrementalized into 15 minute chunks. Some freelancers (for PR, graphic design, web design and other jobs that bill by the hour) do the same.
work  labor  workculture  worklifebalance 
may 2019 by dirtystylus
‘It makes me feel invisible’
It happened again. Nicholas Pilapil got an email clearly meant for his co-worker, Jonathan Castanien. Previously, Pilapil had missed a meeting invitation because their white co-workers couldn’t tell them apart.

So they came up with a cheeky way to address the problem. Between their desks, Pilapil and Castanien hung a sign that read, “This company has worked __ days without an incident. Incorrect names are avoidable.”
racism  workculture  microaggressions  via:ranafayez 
may 2019 by dirtystylus
MeToo impact: Male managers are avoiding women rather than reckoning with harassment.
In a recent report from the New York Times, male managers attending the annual meeting of the World Economic Forum in Davos, Switzerland disclosed that rather than attempt substantive institutional change, their method of reducing the risk of sexual misconduct was “simply minimizing contact between female employees and senior male executives” in their companies.
mentoring  management  sexism  metoo  workculture  leadership  equity  women 
january 2019 by dirtystylus
Ask Polly: ‘I Will Never Be Who I Want to Be’
Your religion does not understand that mere survival can be wildly taxing.
mentalhealth  workculture  burnout  worklifebalance  women 
january 2019 by dirtystylus
Productivity culture will deceive you (especially... |
Productivity culture will deceive you (especially if you are particularly high-functioning or a former Gifted Kid) into thinking that any use of your time that can’t be monetized or leveraged for your personal advancement is worthless, and I’m here to tell you that’s the devil talking. Do shit because you like it.
productivity  capitalism  career  worklifebalance  workculture 
january 2019 by dirtystylus
Kate Leth on Twitter: "Ha ha, ha ha… "
There is no abusive “genius”
who could not be replaced
by someone who isn’t shitty
humor  management  leadership  workculture 
january 2019 by dirtystylus
Anna "Tech Debt Engineer" Filina on Twitter: "I hear this over and over: devs are expected to learn in their spare time, participate in open source, attend meetups, etc. I disagree. There's nothing wrong with being a 9 to 5 developer who goes home to thei
I hear this over and over: devs are expected to learn in their spare time, participate in open source, attend meetups, etc. I disagree. There's nothing wrong with being a 9 to 5 developer who goes home to their other interests.
workculture  worklifebalance  opensource  techculture  by:annafilina  twitterthread 
april 2018 by dirtystylus
This Study of 400,000 People Reveals the 1 Reason Employees Work Harder (and It's Not Pay or Benefits or Culture Decks) | Inc.com
So don't waste time crafting that culture deck (you secretly hope will go viral) until your promotion process truly reflects your goals, both for your company and your employees.
teambuilding  workculture  management 
january 2018 by dirtystylus
Jonathan Eyler-Werve (@EylerWerve) | Twitter
How we work:

* Include everyone. Listen.
* Strategy first, then tools.
* Fail early. Innovate. Repeat.
* Learn onto documents.
* Define success with metrics.
workflow  teamwork  manifesto  workculture 
september 2017 by dirtystylus
For an Inclusive Culture, Try Working Less – Hacker Noon
I don’t know how useful this will be to anyone else, but the lesson I’m taking for myself going forward is this: if you want to build an inclusive culture, build a minimum culture. Build it around professionalism, boundaries, and work-life balance. Make sure your senior staff walks the walk, and spreads the word.

I’m reminded here of the idea behind “Getting to Yes”, that classic work on negotiation. The idea is that, in negotiation, if you work to constrain the number of things the involved parties have to agree on, you increase your chances of coming to agreement. You set aside your desires and, in service of coming to agreement, just focus on your needs. Seems obvious in retrospect, but was actually revolutionary in the business world.
management  techculture  workculture  diversity  inclusion  via:peter_chappy 
june 2017 by dirtystylus
Where should designers sit? – Org Design for Design Orgs
There is a third way, for companies with enough office space. Designers can have two seats — a primary one with their cross-functional team, and a secondary one with their design team (or with the whole design org). That way they still spend most of their time with their cross-functional colleagues, but also get time for critique, fresh eyes, fresh thinking, mentorship, etc., from the rest of the design team.
design  management  workflow  collaboration  office  workculture  techculture  teamwork 
june 2017 by dirtystylus
« earlier      
per page:    204080120160

Copy this bookmark:





to read