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edavey : sysadmin   35

GoAccess - Visual Web Log Analyzer
GoAccess is an open source real-time web log analyzer and interactive viewer that runs in a terminal in *nix systems or through your browser.

It provides fast and valuable HTTP statistics for system administrators that require a visual server report on the fly.
analytics  logging  sysadmin 
february 2019 by edavey
Babushka - babushka
Babushka is a humble tool for automating computing chores.

That’s what babushka is for. Once you describe a job using its DSL, babushka can not only accomplish each part of the job, but also check if each part is already satisfied. For each component of the job, a test, along with the code to make that test pass – test-driven sysadmin.
devops  provisioning  sysadmin 
august 2016 by edavey
Unix Toolbox
This document is a collection of Unix/Linux/BSD commands and tasks which are useful for IT work or for advanced users. This is a practical guide with concise explanations, however the reader is supposed to know what s/he is doing.
devops  sysadmin  unix  linux 
august 2015 by edavey
Ncdu Screenshots
NCurses based interactive Disk Usage
Nice!
du  sysadmin 
january 2015 by edavey
Plans and Pricing - Honeybadger
Exception, uptime, and performance monitoring for Ruby.
monitoring  sysadmin 
november 2014 by edavey
nicolargo/glances
Glances is a cross-platform curses-based system monitoring tool written in Python.

It uses the psutil library to get information from your system.
monitoring  sysadmin 
june 2014 by edavey
intercity/chef-repo
Set up your server to host Ruby on Rails apps.
chef  rails  devops  sysadmin 
february 2014 by edavey
Chef cookbooks for busy Ruby developers - teohm.dev
Have you ever setup a Rails production environment from scratch, by hand? If you had, I share your pain every time when a new project started.

The process is often repetitive. To me, it seems to be a waste to do it manually every time. It also consumes time and attention. It would be great if I could spend them on tasks that bring more values to clients.

To minimize such waste, I have written two Chef cookbooks to automate the process
chef  sysadmin  devops 
february 2014 by edavey
Chef cookbooks for busy Ruby developers - teohm.dev
Have you ever setup a Rails production environment from scratch, by hand? If you had, I share your pain every time when a new project started.

The process is often repetitive. To me, it seems to be a waste to do it manually every time. It also consumes time and attention. It would be great if I could spend them on tasks that bring more values to clients.

To minimize such waste, I have written two Chef cookbooks to automate the process:

rackbox - to provision rack-based web server (Nginx as front server, Unicorn and Passenger as upstream app servers, rbenv as ruby version manager).
databox - to provision database server (supports MySQL and PostgreSQL).
chef  rails  ruby  sysadmin 
april 2013 by edavey
socat: Linux / UNIX TCP Port Forwarder
Socat is a command line based utility that establishes two bidirectional byte streams and transfers data between them. Because the streams can be constructed from a large set of different types of data sinks and sources (see address types), and because lots of address options may be applied to the streams, socat can be used for many different purposes.
sysadmin  socat 
october 2012 by edavey
iain/roundsman
This is an attempt to combine the powers of Capistrano and chef-solo.

The only thing you need is SSH access and a supported OS. At this time only Ubuntu is supported.
sysadmin  chef  capistrano  ruby  development 
april 2012 by edavey
subprocess – Work with additional processes - Python Module of the Week
subprocess – Work with additional processes¶
Purpose: Spawn and communicate with additional processes.
Available In: 2.4 and later
The subprocess module provides a consistent interface to creating and working with additional processes. It offers a higher-level interface than some of the other available modules, and is intended to replace functions such as os.system(), os.spawn*(), os.popen*(), popen2.*() and commands.*(). To make it easier to compare subprocess with those other modules, many of the examples here re-create the ones used for os and popen.

The subprocess module defines one class, Popen and a few wrapper functions that use that class. The constructor for Popen takes arguments to set up the new process so the parent can communicate with it via pipes. It provides all of the functionality of the other modules and functions it replaces, and more. The API is consistent for all uses, and many of the extra steps of overhead needed (such as closing extra file descriptors and ensuring the pipes are closed) are “built in” instead of being handled by the application code separately.
python  shell  sysadmin 
january 2012 by edavey
nbrochu/smooth_s3 - GitHub
Smooth S3 is a user-friendly superset of the S3 gem geared towards file system backup operations. It greatly simplifies regular file uploads to S3 by using Convention over Configuration™. The library also adds new features such as directory syncronization and timestamped uploads, which should come in real handy to anyone doing backup scripts on a regular basis. A decent amount of control is left to the developer: You can specify a prefix path to use with any upload and provide your own timestamp formats if desired.

The goal with Smooth S3 is to facilitate and simplify your S3 uploads. It is a library focused on the file system, so no integration with MySQL, third-party services or anything like that. Nothing prevents you from doing a mysqldump and uploading the results in the same script using Smooth S3 though ;)
ruby  s3  amazon  sysadmin 
december 2011 by edavey
njonsson/cape - GitHub
If

You use Capistrano to deploy your application, and
You have Rake tasks you want to run remotely — but you don’t want to hand-code Capistrano recipes for each Rake task —
Then

You can use the Cape DSL within Capistrano recipes to dynamically add recipes for your application’s Rake tasks, and
You can run your Rake tasks on your deployed servers, friction-free, and look like a superhero. [cue fanfare]
rails  rake  ruby  development  sysadmin  deployment  capistrano 
december 2011 by edavey
xjperf - Graphical frontend for IPERF written in Java - Google Project Hosting
Iperf was developed by NLANR/DAST as a modern alternative for measuring maximum TCP and UDP bandwidth performance. Iperf allows the tuning of various parameters and UDP characteristics. Iperf reports bandwidth, delay jitter, datagram loss.
sysadmin  networking  performance 
september 2011 by edavey
asemanfar - Why We Wrote Bluepill
At Serious Business, we use god to monitor our long-running processes (mongrel, background workers, and more recently unicorn). We had a basic god config setup that only checks for memory usage, cpu usage, and request queue length (for mongrels only). God was working fine for us except for one problem: the notorious memory leak. If you use god you probably know it leaks memory in correlation with the number of watches on the system. This became a problem for us when god hadn't been restarted for several days; its memory usage would climb and reach several gigs, causing the machine to swap and eventually lock-up. To prevent lock-ups we needed to manually monitor god (what does that make us?) and restart god daily via cron, gross.

Our frustration with this issue eventually reached a point where we decided to write our own process monitoring tool. Rohith Ravi, Gary Tsang, and I got together one weekend and built a first version of what we've come to call bluepill. We spent the next couple weeks massaging the DSL, expanding feature set, and fixing some bugs we found while using it for our apps.
monitoring  ruby  sysadmin 
august 2011 by edavey
CronWTF!
try out your crontab
cron  sysadmin 
july 2011 by edavey
Introducing logtrend, or HTTP Request Trending With EventMachine
The following code demonstrates a simple way to trend the volume of HTTP requests in your environment.
sysadmin  architecture  logging 
december 2010 by edavey
mnot’s blog: Digging Deeper with htracr
There’s a lot of current activity on the binding between HTTP and TCP; from pipelining to SPDY, the frontier of Web performance lives between these layers.

To get more visibility in exactly what’s happening down there, I decided to throw together a little tool to give more visibility into how HTTP uses TCP: htracr.

In a nutshell, It’s a packet sniffer written in JavaScript, thanks to node_pcap, and it uses RaphaelJS to visualise what’s going on. It’s still very young (lots of bugs to fix, lots of features to add), but I thought I’d share some early observations that it’s made possible.
development  javascript  visualisation  sysadmin 
november 2010 by edavey

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