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The New York Times: Analyzing the Patterns in Trump’s Falsehoods About Coronavirus
For months, the president has downplayed the severity of the pandemic, overstated the impact of his policies and potential treatments, blamed others and tried to rewrite the history of his response.
Read in The New York Times: https://apple.news/AvBQoOXlCS7iAmRzIX6fxIw
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4 days ago
POLITICO: A far-right rallying cry: Older Americans should volunteer to work
Older Americans are key drivers of the country's faltering economy — and more at risk of dying from the coronavirus.
Read in POLITICO: https://apple.news/AGOnGjyqORF2JsAcsQDfYIA
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5 days ago
The Washington Post: Hospitals consider universal do-not-resuscitate orders for coronavirus patients
Worries that “all hands” responses may expose doctors and nurses to infection prompts debate about prioritizing the needs of the many over the one.
Read in The Washington Post: https://apple.news/AwyJGGCfyTsaQkw2RSmZlHg
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7 days ago
WIRED: How to Clean and Disinfect Yourself, Your Home, and Your Stuff
These are our in-depth best practices for keeping yourself (and just about everything else) clean and virus-free.
Read in WIRED: https://apple.news/ARfg4HDgWQ4iaKUQc4kMkXA
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10 days ago
Barron's: S&P 500 Could Find Support Around 2300, Market Technicians Say
Technical analysis offers unique insights into market trends, especially in times of chaos. Why three practitioners see support for the S&P 500 around 2300. What the charts say about oil, emerging markets, health care, Walmart.
Read in Barron's: https://apple.news/Axqos-gZJRvyHtD9RoFDp-g
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10 days ago
Axios: Ohio and Illinois order bars and restaurants to close due to coronavirus
Ohio Gov. Mike DeWine announced Sunday afternoon that the state government will be issuing an order closing all bars and restaurants in Ohio beginning at 9 pm ET. Shortly after, Illinois Gov. J.B. Pritzker ordered all bars and restaurants in his state to be closed from Monday evening through March 30.
Read in Axios: https://apple.news/AzSrIZ8UOTNCTgprQyQjf5Q
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17 days ago
The Washington Post: Trump is breaking every rule in the CDC’s 450-page playbook for health crisis
The Trump administration's mixed and inconsistent messages throughout the coronavirus crisis have endangered the most important tool: Public trust.
Read in The Washington Post: https://apple.news/A_hXkmqzWSt-vOMhXuiz8bA
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17 days ago
The Wall Street Journal: Should You Clean Your Phone to Combat Coronavirus? Definitely... Maybe.
Is your phone covered in germs? Absolutely. Should it be cleaned? Depends on whom you ask. If it makes you feel better, here are the best (and worst) ways to do it.
Read in The Wall Street Journal: https://apple.news/AaXEeCEW5QRikOANbjgY3SQ
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17 days ago
ABC News: Trump disbanded NSC pandemic unit that experts had praised
Public health and national security experts shake their heads when President Donald Trump says the coronavirus "came out of nowhere" and “blindsided the world.”
Read in ABC News: https://apple.news/AUUQI7Vm6TTu1EUTMYpisgw
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18 days ago
Fox News: Gov. DeWine: 100,000 believed to have coronavirus in Ohio, number projected to double every six days
The state of Ohio is seeing "very difficult times" under the threat of the coronavirus pandemic, Gov. Mike DeWine said Friday.
Read in Fox News: https://apple.news/AOnBnAnkGS9eAX-w4oDLVPg
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19 days ago
Forbes: Reinventing Industry And Technology To Regenerate Nature
“Could we pay off our trillion-ton carbon debt? Yes, definitely … use your skills and go do it.” A conversation with Tom Chi, brilliant and celebrated Ex-Google exec, on reinventing industry, technology and society amidst the climate crisis.
Read in Forbes: https://apple.news/A9E5aXsb3R-iEKD6DLQCT7g
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24 days ago
LADbible: Topless Women Form Chain On Waterloo Bridge In Climate Change Protest
The protesters say they are highlighting the 'vulnerability of women in the face of climate breakdown'
Read in LADbible: https://apple.news/ADQ2T2MvtTD6FlReY2ADGDg
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24 days ago
CNN: New CDC guidance says older adults should 'stay at home as much as possible' due to coronavirus
Amid a coronavirus outbreak in the United States, the US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention is encouraging older people and people with severe chronic medical conditions to "stay at home as much as possible."
Read in CNN: https://apple.news/AymksIYXBTtKFax4b1DrWpg
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26 days ago
Zacks Investment Research: ETFs to Combat Climate Change
Here we discuss some ETFs that can help fight the battle against the heightening climate-change risks.
Read in Zacks Investment Research: https://apple.news/AqiBkZUx1TJmsZLNPCxRP-w
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5 weeks ago
Forbes: 11 Fashion Companies Leading The Way In Sustainability
The fashion industry is known for creating trends, and now it’s working on its most important trend yet: sustainability. And unlike some questionable fashion decisions, this is a trend all consumers can get behind.
Read in Forbes: https://apple.news/AMUxU_AdvRIOJhpgUJhjvKw
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5 weeks ago
National Geographic: New York City has a turtle problem
Abandoned pets are wreaking havoc on city parks.
Read in National Geographic: https://apple.news/AGLkSkbvbRa6Nn6M-0zkMMA
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5 weeks ago
Bloomberg: It’s the warmest winter ever and it's the North Pole’s fault
Climate change and odd Arctic weather patterns combined to keep the cold from moving south.
Read in Bloomberg: https://apple.news/AvcmKFKcZTh63a05gHgxFWg
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5 weeks ago
The Atlantic: The Cascading Consequences of the Worst Disease Ever
Nature is clearly in crisis—but what do researchers do when they only have imperfect data on the extent of the losses?
Read in The Atlantic: https://apple.news/A8TnKHA_vQoqoCJIQYw9VtA
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6 weeks ago
Jeremy Grantham Called the Financial Crisis. He Has Another Warning for Investors. - Barron's 021220
For more than 15 years, Jeremy Grantham, co-founder of the Boston-based asset-management firm GMO—and credited with predicting the 2000 and 2008 downturns—has spoken out about the perils of the changing climate and what it means for life on Earth.
Now the world is paying attention. The World Economic Forum has determined that the top five risks are climate-change related, with extreme weather as the No. 1 global risk. And the Task Force on Climate-Related Financial Disclosures (TCFD) announced Wednesday that its program has...
vcap  sustainability  investing  climate_change 
7 weeks ago
The 100 Most Sustainable U.S. Companies | Barron's 020820
How much of a company’s journey toward sustainability is driven by the personal passions of its CEO? Based on the conversations Barron’s had recently with several corporate chieftains, quite a lot. That’s one of the insights from our second annual sustainability ranking of public companies.

Consider Voya Financial (ticker: VOYA), the insurer and retirement-savings company that vaulted to No. 6 this year from No. 46 last year. Even before Voya separated from Dutch parent ING and went public in 2013, its CEO was already planning...
vcap  sustainability  investing 
7 weeks ago
Matt Levine: Tesla Has Some Wild Times - Bloomberg 020620
Matt Levine: For tax and financing and historical and cultural reasons, real estate companies like to be owned by their CEOs through several separate vehicles and also owe their CEOs a lot of money while their CEOs somehow simultaneously owe them a lot of money. Opacity, structuring, everyone being on every side of every transaction at once: Those are characteristics of the industry, not unique to WeWork.
Still Brookfield is a little special in that it is controlled by an entity called Partners Limited, whose “40 members own about one-fifth of BAM, but have enough votes to appoint nine of its 16 directors.” And BAM in turn manages assets for BPY and other outside investors and entities. So you have a small semi-secret group (“The identity of some of those ‘partners’ is not clear”) of people who control a public company most of whose capital comes from outsiders, and that company in turn runs further companies with further outside capital, so you have some $500 billion in assets indirectly controlled by a small group of people with a relatively modest economic stake. Or in technical terms:
Those insiders wield such power that the companies below them could face risks similar to those of “pyramid control companies”, according to a draft investor disclosure that Brookfield filed with the Securities and Exchange Commission in 2013.
vcap  BAM  Vanguard  investing 
7 weeks ago
Brookfield: inside the $500bn secretive investment firm | Financial Times 020520
To unpack the Canadian group’s accounts is to discover not so much a company as a giant, triangular jigsaw board that spreads across the world and covers assets worth $500bn. The pieces are hundreds of corporate entities, all locked together by elaborate contracts, which give 40 people at the top the right to rule huge sections of the puzzle almost as if it were their own. Those insiders wield such power that the companies below them could face risks similar to those of “pyramid control companies”, according to a draft investor disclosure that Brookfield filed with the Securities and Exchange Commission in 2013. (The final version warned instead of risks “associated with a separation of economic interest from control”.) [see file BAM inside the secretive firm FT 020520]
vcap  BAM  investing  REIT 
7 weeks ago
The Atlantic: The night sky will never be the same
Elon Musk’s plan for worldwide internet has sent bright artificial, lights streaking through the dark.
Read in The Atlantic: https://apple.news/AVS39i9EwTGaMaZxfeSDUzw
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7 weeks ago
CNN Politics: Analysis: The hidden worst part of Donald Trump's unhinged impeachment victory speech
Less than 24 hours after formally being acquitted by the Senate, President Donald Trump riffed for over an hour from inside the White House — a vengeful, angry, fact-challenged spew of score-settling that even for this most unorthodox of presidents was eye-opening in its tone and jaw-dropping in its boundary busting.
Read in CNN Politics: https://apple.news/AJtEa33LQQe-eUn9eE2G6lQ
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7 weeks ago
Bloomberg: Wind turbine blades can’t be recycled, so they’re piling up in landfills
Companies are searching for ways to deal with the tens of thousands of blades that have reached the end of their lives.
Read in Bloomberg: https://apple.news/A6IOgLLgSSYuLlTq3QVEpzw
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7 weeks ago
Follow the Drinking Gourd: A Cultural History | by Joel Bresler 2012
The American folksong Follow the Drinking Gourd was first published in 1928. The Drinking Gourd song was supposedly used by an Underground Railroad operative to encode escape instructions and a map. These directions then enabled fleeing slaves to make their way north from Mobile, Alabama to the Ohio River and freedom. Taken at face value, the "drinking gourd" refers to the hollowed out gourd used by slaves (and other rural Americans) as a water dipper. But here it is used as a code name for the Big Dipper star formation, which points to Polaris, the Pole Star, and North.
In the ensuing 80 years, the Drinking Gourd played an important role in the Civil Rights and folk revival movements of the 1950s and 1960s, and in contemporary elementary school education. Much of the Drinking Gourd's enduring appeal derives from its perceived status as a unique, historical remnant harkening back to the pre-Civil War South – no other such map songs survive. But re-examining the Drinking Gourd song as history rather than folklore raises many questions. And the Drinking Gourd as it appears in roughly 200 recordings, dozens of songbooks, several award-winning children's books and many other places is surely not "traditional." The signature line in the chorus, "for the old man is awaitin' for to carry you to freedom," could not possibly have been sung by escaping slaves, because it was written by Lee Hays eighty years after the end of the Civil War. (1)
gh  underground_railroad  Grinell_Mill  playing_by_ear 
8 weeks ago
SCIENMAG: Planned hydropower dams threaten fish in the tropics
Planned hydropower dams will greatly increase threats for freshwater fish species because of habitat fragmentation, especially in the tropics. This was already suspected, but environmental researchers at Radboud University, PBL Netherlands Environmental Assessment Agency, Stanford Natural Capital Project and others now provide evidence by mapping how future dams affect the habitats of 10,000 fish species. They publish their findings in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the
Read in SCIENMAG: https://apple.news/AvwBfcs0iRc2a4jE3_t8GVA
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8 weeks ago
Forbes: The Coronavirus Ends The Melt-Up For The Dow, S&P And Nasdaq
The spreading coronavirus hit the stock market last Monday and Friday. The three days in between were rebounds as positive fourth-quarter earnings reports trumped the virus.
Read in Forbes: https://apple.news/ALZwQVDXIQNal8ErRNkF-GA
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8 weeks ago
Bloomberg: These Billionaires Made Their Fortunes by Trying to Stop Climate Change
They’re among the first to profit from climate solutions—but they won’t be the last.
Read in Bloomberg: https://apple.news/A1ITVSSObQxG9P2PpTWlJBQ
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9 weeks ago
Josiah Henson - Wikipedia
Josiah Henson (June 15, 1789 – May 5, 1883) was an author, abolitionist, and minister. Born into slavery, in Port Tobacco, Charles County, Maryland, he escaped to Upper Canada (now Ontario) in 1830, and founded a settlement and laborer's school for other fugitive slaves at Dawn, near Dresden, in Kent County, Upper Canada, of British Canada. Henson's autobiography, The Life of Josiah Henson, Formerly a Slave, Now an Inhabitant of Canada, as Narrated by Himself (1849), is believed to have inspired the title character of Harriet Beecher Stowe's Uncle Tom's Cabin (1852).[1] Following the success of Stowe's novel, Henson issued an expanded version of his memoir in 1858, Truth Stranger Than Fiction. Father Henson's Story of His Own Life (published Boston: John P. Jewett & Company, 1858). Interest in his life continued, and nearly two decades later, his life story was updated and published as Uncle Tom's Story of His Life: An Autobiography of the Rev. Josiah Henson (1876).
gh  books  underground_railroad  Ontario  19th_century  history 
9 weeks ago
CNBC: Your iPhone can tell you if you're listening to music too loud — here's how
The iPhone can tell you if you're listening to music too loud in your headphones, like AirPods, and you might find that noise-cancelling headphones can help.
Read in CNBC: https://apple.news/A0NDiJVvbRpy91whoYe0lOA
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10 weeks ago
William Still - Wikipedia
William Still (October 7, 1821[1][2] — July 14, 1902) was an African-American abolitionist based in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. He was a conductor on the Underground Railroad, businessman, writer, historian and civil rights activist. Before the American Civil War, Still was chairman of the Vigilance Committee of the Pennsylvania Anti-Slavery Society. He directly aided fugitive slaves and also kept records of the people served in order to help families reunite.
gh  Grinell_Mill  underground_railroad  19th_century  history  books 
10 weeks ago
The Washington Post: National Archives exhibit blurs images critical of President Trump
Officials altered a photo of the 2017 Women’s March to avoid “political controversy.”
Read in The Washington Post: https://apple.news/A6EXMZzaMSE26dR3w1_Qp4A
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10 weeks ago
MEL Magazine: What the ‘Stonks’ Meme Can Teach You About Smart Personal Finance
It's actually a great distillation of Boglehead investing
Read in MEL Magazine: https://apple.news/A-CuI5kB5S8638lRwWN7Z9w
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11 weeks ago
The New York Times: What Is Trump’s Iran Strategy? Few Seem to Know
Friend and foe alike are left puzzled over what President Trump aimed to achieve by killing a top Iranian general, what he might do next or how Tehran could mollify him.
Read in The New York Times: https://apple.news/Aryk2c5N7TFuEkQutqxz7CQ
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12 weeks ago
A Typical Trump Vacation, With a Momentous Result - The New York Times
A Typical Trump Vacation, With a Momentous Result
By Maggie HabermanJan. 5, 2020
For three years, President Trump’s winter visits to Mar-a-Lago, his private club, have allowed him time to combine his personal and presidential business. But the juxtaposition this year was something quite different.
President Trump taking questions from reporters last month at Mar-a-Lago in Palm Beach, Fla.Anna Moneymaker/The New York Times
PALM BEACH, Fla. — Beneath wind-swept palm trees and gilded chandeliers, President Trump dined with Rush Limbaugh and congratulated Keith Hernandez, the Mets announcer and former first baseman, on his wedding. He consulted with his national security and campaign advisers while basking in 80-degree weather, and, as always, he tweeted.
He also authorized a military strike that has roiled the Middle East and is likely to endure as one of the most consequential acts of his presidency.
For three years, Mr. Trump’s winter visits to Mar-a-Lago, his private club, have allowed him time to combine his personal and presidential business, often in the midst of the club’s wealthy members and his adoring friends.
But the jarring juxtapositions this year seemed to highlight some central elements in the way Mr. Trump has governed: the little interest he has in planning beyond the day in front of him, his need for positive feedback and an unwillingness to modulate his behavior, whatever the circumstance.
From the outside, the president’s two-week winter vacation in Palm Beach, Fla., seemed similar to his previous long stays, except for the fact that he had recently been impeached.
The days were generally marked by casual-wear trips to his nearby golf club, where he would talk with members and meet with White House advisers. The evenings were marked by elaborate dinners at Mar-a-Lago that included his family members, his campaign advisers and his national security aides.
But Mr. Trump’s vacation was more than the usual refuge from negative news coverage and official Washington. He was agitated by uncertainty about what comes next in the impeachment process, and expressed gnawing concerns about how much the billionaire Michael R. Bloomberg is spending on his campaign for the 2020 Democratic presidential nomination in the election that Mr. Trump hopes to win.
Throughout Christmas week, the president watched the news coverage on impeachment and tweeted his frustrations with Speaker Nancy Pelosi for slowing down the process by refusing to send to the Senate the articles charging him with high crimes and misdemeanors. He spoke with advisers about what the Senate trial might look like.
And there were other grievances, as well.
On Sunday, Dec. 29, hours after a stabbing at the home of a rabbi in Monsey, N.Y., Mr. Trump, from his golf club in West Palm Beach, called one of his oldest acquaintances and major Jewish supporters, the cosmetics billionaire Ronald S. Lauder, to yell that Mr. Lauder should be doing more to “support” him, according to three people briefed on the call.
Mr. Lauder, the president of the World Jewish Congress who recently started a new $25 million effort to fight anti-Semitism that employs a pollster working for Mr. Bloomberg, listened as Mr. Trump ticked off a litany of administration actions. Mr. Trump said that he had done more for Jews than any other president and that he could still lose the Jewish vote. The president never mentioned campaign contributions, but advisers and others briefed on the call said he left the clear impression that was referring to financial support.
In a statement, Mr. Lauder would say only that he has had “many candid, positive and forward-looking conversations with” Mr. Trump, who “deserves a great deal of support from the Jewish community for his fantastic record on Israel and his proven support of the Jewish people here at home.”
Then it was time to get back to White House work, and Mr. Trump huddled with advisers offering him a range of options on how to respond to the death of an American civilian contractor killed on Dec. 27 in a rocket attack on an Iraqi military base. The menu of choices included the most extreme one — killing Maj. Gen. Qassim Suleimani, Iran’s most powerful commander.
On New Year’s Eve, Mr. Trump hosted his annual party at Mar-a-Lago, arriving in a tuxedo with the first lady, Melania Trump, and playing M.C. to a crowd that included his personal lawyer Rudolph W. Giuliani.
On Jan. 2, the president began his day at his golf club. But mindful of not appearing weak in the face the rocket attack and concerned that an assault on the American Embassy in Baghdad that United States officials said was orchestrated by Iran could have ended in devastation, Mr. Trump had already settled on a course of action.
In the middle of a meeting with campaign advisers, he left the table to give the final authorization to kill General Suleimani. The president then returned, and, compartmentalizing what had just happened, resumed talking about the campaign.
It was an act of enormous consequence, but the White House made no public statement for hours, though the president cryptically tweeted about what had taken place. Whatever the administration’s objectives were, and whatever intelligence they had used to justify the strike, it was not being shared in any conventional fashion.
Mr. Trump closely monitored reactions to his military action, taking note of who praised him publicly among Republicans and who did not, like Tucker Carlson, the Fox News host. He was encouraged by others on the Trump-friendly network.
But finally, on Friday afternoon, as he was about leave on a short helicopter ride to Miami for a campaign event with evangelical supporters, he abruptly agreed to make a statement on the strike.
His decision to speak came partly at the prodding of his son-in-law, Jared Kushner, who had jumped in to try to direct the public response.
So aides draped one of the private dining rooms at Mar-a-Lago with a presidential blue cloth as a backdrop to the presidential podium. Roughly five minutes after he started talking, Mr. Trump was done.
Next up was Miami, and there, at the King Jesus International Ministry, he excoriated the “fake news,” declared from the dais that two progressive congresswomen “hate” Jewish people, taunted the Democratic presidential candidate Pete Buttigieg for his faith, and said God was “on our side.”
The president’s final day of vacation, Saturday, was spent at the golf club, and was punctuated by a handful of tweets.
That night, Mr. Trump strolled through Mar-a-Lago, a phalanx of aides in tow, as Mr. Hernandez got married in an adjacent room, according to attendees. The president did not attend the wedding, but did offer congratulations.
Some people reached out to shake his hand or just to touch his arm as he passed their tables. For the second night, Mr. Trump heard approval from club members and their guests who thought he had acted decisively.
Less than 24 hours later, he began his return to Washington, where the temperature was much colder and the grind of his fourth year in office and his campaign for another term were just beginning.
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12 weeks ago
CNN Politics: Analysis: Donald Trump's disgusting and deplorable attack on Debbie Dingell
Over the past three years, the American public has developed a tolerance to President Donald Trump: Things that might have once shocked now merit merely a raised eyebrow. Or an eyeroll. Or nothing at all.
Read in CNN Politics: https://apple.news/APWVQos2bSQydwuwKbOGxRQ
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december 2019
BBC News: World's oldest fossil trees uncovered in New York
Fossil trees, dating back 386 million years, have been found at an abandoned quarry in New York.
Read in BBC News: https://apple.news/Ar6PERk15TVyJy2ujDQ2otg
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december 2019
The Washington Post: Former White House officials say they feared Putin influenced the president’s views on Ukraine and 2016 campaign
One former senior White House official said Trump even stated so explicitly at one point, saying he knew Ukraine was the real culprit because “Putin told me.”
Read in The Washington Post: https://apple.news/Ai_6kKWb9TaqZWxQvmx6eOg
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december 2019
USA TODAY: You’re not paranoid: Your phone really is listening in
When you use your default settings, everything you say may be recorded through your mobile device’s onboard microphone
Read in USA TODAY: https://apple.news/AW5TMoLqqQ4WGRpItfsx2XA
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december 2019
CNN: Stone Age chewing gum holds clues to the life of a young girl who lived 5,700 years ago
Lola, a young girl who lived in Denmark 5,700 years ago, had blue eyes, dark skin and dark hair. Her last meal included hazelnuts and mallard duck. And the reason we know any of this is because she chewed on birch pitch, a material that functioned a bit like an ancient chewing gum.
Read in CNN: https://apple.news/AuJzQsfipSk25GkZf7vHqjA
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december 2019
Vanity Fair: Trump Pens Deranged Six-Page Impeachment Letter, Mails It to Nancy Pelosi
If the president was trying to make the case that he is fit for office, he failed miserably.
Read in Vanity Fair: https://apple.news/AbHai5TFTT6uu0vAp7DScAw
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december 2019
The Wall Street Journal: The Best Books of 2019
The 10 fiction and nonfiction books that defined our year.
Read in The Wall Street Journal: https://apple.news/A7cpMTWSjTLWqjSOqtGeA5g
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december 2019
CNN Politics: Cyberbullying crusader Melania Trump silent on her husband's mocking of 16-year-old Thunberg
Her cause is anti-bullying, which is making the first lady's silence deafening.
Read in CNN Politics: https://apple.news/A15P3dJFqRFutrCGLYA0ZWg
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december 2019
The Brendan Voyage - Wikipedia
The Brendan Voyage was Shaun Davey's first major orchestral suite, composed for uilleann pipes played by Liam O'Flynn. It depicts Tim Severin’s adventure in reconstructing Saint Brendan’s 6th century Atlantic crossing to America. It features guest musicians Paul MacAteer (drums), Garvan Gallagher (electric bass) and Tommy Hayes (bodhran). The album title is also the title of Severin's book (ISBN 0-375-75524-1).
gh  Grinell_Mill  books  playing_by_ear  Brendan 
december 2019
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