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[1806.00680] Datacenter RPCs can be General and Fast
It is commonly believed that datacenter networking software must sacrifice generality to attain high performance. The popularity of specialized distributed systems designed specifically for niche technologies such as RDMA, lossless networks, FPGAs, and programmable switches testifies to this belief. In this paper, we show that such specialization is not necessary. eRPC is a new general-purpose remote procedure call (RPC) library that offers performance comparable to specialized systems, while running on commodity CPUs in traditional datacenter networks based on either lossy Ethernet or lossless fabrics. eRPC performs well in three key metrics: message rate for small messages; bandwidth for large messages; and scalability to a large number of nodes and CPU cores. It handles packet loss, congestion, and background request execution. In microbenchmarks, one CPU core can handle up to 10 million small RPCs per second, or send large messages at 75 Gbps. We port a production-grade implementation of Raft state machine replication to eRPC without modifying the core Raft source code. We achieve 5.5 microseconds of replication latency on lossy Ethernet, which is faster than or comparable to specialized replication systems that use programmable switches, FPGAs, or RDMA.
datacenter  networking  performance  benchmark  comp-sci  research  paper 
february 2019 by jabley
[no title]
The fastest plans in MPP databases are usually those with
the least amount of data movement across nodes, as data
is not processed while in transit. The network switches
that connect MPP nodes are hard-wired to perform packetforwarding logic only. However, in a recent paradigm shift,
network devices are becoming “programmable.” The quotes
here are cautionary. Switches are not becoming general purpose computers (just yet). But now the set of tasks they can
perform can be encoded in software.
In this paper we explore this programmability to accelerate OLAP queries. We determined that we can offload
onto the switch some very common and expensive query
patterns. Thus, for the first time, moving data through
networking equipment can contribute to query execution.
Our preliminary results show that we can improve response
times on even the best agreed upon plans by more than 2x
using 25 Gbps networks. We also see the promise of linear
performance improvement with faster speeds. The use of
programmable switches can open new possibilities of architecting rack- and datacenter-sized database systems, with
implications across the stack.
filetype:pdf  paper  comp-sci  database  networking  hardware  optimisation  datacenter  design 
january 2019 by jabley
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