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“I can’t be the only one who has to stop and think which “direction” filter() goes. Am I filtering in or out?”
> I can’t be the only one who has to stop and think which “direction” filter() goes. Am I filtering in or out?
jason-brennan  naming  functional  filter 
6 hours ago
Fuck The Vessel
> The depth of architectural thinking at work here makes a kiddie-pool seem oceanic.

​> It really is the perfect name, however, not least because it implies a certain emptiness.

​> It is a Vessel for a so-called neighborhood that poorly masks its intention to build luxury assets for the criminally wealthy under the guise of investing in the city and “public space.”

​> Unlike a real neighborhood, which implies some kind of social collaboration or collective expression of belonging, Hudson Yards is a contrived place that was never meant for us.

​> The presence of the elevator implies a pressure for the abled-bodied to not use it, since by doing so one bypasses “the experience” of the Vessel, an experience of menial physical labor that aims to achieve the nebulous goal of attaining slightly different views of the city.
kate-wagner  architecture  hudson-yards  criticism  capitalism  accessibility 
6 hours ago
Comparing Reactive and Traditional
> It’s a collection of small functions and properties without a linear story.

​> Part of me does not want to encourage people to use RxSwift for the reasons I’ve outlined. But part of me very much wants to encourage people to use RxSwift — because change comes, in part, from the community pushing the state of the art.

​> But if you do use it, and some time in the future there’s a nice, declarative way of handling events and dealing with state, then I’ll have you to thank for helping make that come true.
rxswift  brent-simmons  casey-liss  reactive  apple 
10 hours ago
Kickstarter’s staff is unionizing
> “The goal of our union is to have a formal seat at the table to negotiate with management,” the Kickstarter Union organizers write in their email to staff. “We’re negotiating to promote our collective values, and ensure Kickstarter is around for the long haul. We care about preserving what’s great about Kickstarter and improving what isn’t.”

​> Kickstarter has always been a trailblazer, and this is a pivotal moment for tech.
kickstarter  union  labor  via-nikhil-krishnan 
yesterday
inessential: 14 Mar 2019
> The articles are often very well done and beautifully illustrated — and it would be to the benefit of Apple, and app developers, if these articles were findable and readable by people sitting in front of a computer.
apple  rss  app-store  brent-simmons 
yesterday
Some More RSS-y Things
> But here’s the thing: tons of people use RSS readers. There’s no shame in it; you’re not the last person; there’s not going to be a last person.

​> Deliberately — or through inaction — reserving technology for a sophisticated group is Not a Good Thing.
brent-simmons  rss  reeder 
yesterday
“Stories that elicit a big reaction provide us with a big opportunity to acknowledge our most challenging emotions and to wrestle with the assumptions, ideas, and beliefs that may no longer serve us. And that's the *whole* point of writing, of communica
> Stories that elicit a big reaction provide us with a big opportunity to acknowledge our most challenging emotions and to wrestle with the assumptions, ideas, and beliefs that may no longer serve us. And that's the *whole* point of writing, of communicating, and of being human.
victoria-loustalot  writing  criticism  reviews  emotion  stories 
yesterday
Time Tracking
> Since I actually know how long tasks take me, I’m better at planning my days.

​> Some time tracking tools automatically track what you do on your computer, which would certainly be even more accurate than the program I’m using now. However, even though Toggl can’t tell if I’m on Twitter, the timer forces me to actively choose to work or not work. If that timer is running but I’m on Instagram, I know that I’m cheating. It’s a neat psychological tool for holding myself accountable.
quinn-rose  time  time-tracking 
yesterday
“Only spend time on people and activities that could break your heart. Otherwise, even if you win, will it have been worth it?”
> Only spend time on people and activities that could break your heart. Otherwise, even if you win, will it have been worth it?
sam-gerstenzang  love  time 
yesterday
Just doesn’t feel good
> Ad blockers come with an important asterisk: while they do benefit a ton of people in major ways, they also hurt some, including many who don’t deserve the hit.

​> I got to engage the technical part of my brain and make something great that doesn’t hurt anyone, with no asterisks or qualifications.
>
> That’s my peace.
marco-arment  ad-blocking  peace 
yesterday
“Maybe the credential store (culprit 1) is so cumbersome, that the growth oriented team (culprit 2) had to build something sketchy to meet their managers’ (culprit 3) KPIs!”
> Maybe the credential store (culprit 1) is so cumbersome, that the growth oriented team (culprit 2) had to build something sketchy to meet their managers’ (culprit 3) KPIs!
can-duruk  facebook  security 
2 days ago
Open Source Doesn’t Make Money Because It Isn’t Designed To Make Money
> That’s what we think the world should be like, but we all know it isn’t. You can’t make a living making music. Or art. You can’t even make a living taking care of children. I think this underlies many of this moment’s critiques of capitalism: there’s too many things that are important, even needed, or that fulfill us more than any profitable item, and yet are economically unsustainable.
ian-bicking  open-source  capitalism 
2 days ago
“The problem with literally any kind of technology getting better right now is we have to evaluate it not just in terms of ‘what does this do for me,’ but also ‘how does this let the company increase its control over me and my life’”
> this I think relates to what I consider a fundamental problem with software... that it all depends on running on top of something else. that has the unfortunate side effect of meaning some other entity can control it

> a lot more easily than traditional products

> Random House can’t do a damn thing to the books of theirs that I own after I buy them. They’re mine.
technology  control  physical-goods 
3 days ago
Always On
> instead what seemed required was a kind of ironic disavowal of disavowal with regard to our online presentation: The tone foregrounds the idea that we all must put on an act that fools no one.

​> Among the historical antecedents,

​> They reinforce the idea that people should always be working by providing another arena for invidious comparison, self-branding, and optimization. But something more subtle may be happening as well. Social media platforms, like all technologies that mediate the self, “heighten consciousness,” in media scholar Walter Ong’s words. But if earlier technological developments, like writing, heightened consciousness to extend the self, newer technologies may heighten it to a point where it no longer sustains the self but undermines it.

​> writing — the “technologizing of the word,” as Ong described it — distanced us from the flux of immediate experience and expanded consciousness into space and across time. The diary could be considered paradigmatic: It makes subjectivity an object of reflection, both in the moment of composition and for future readers as well.

​> is to see at least some aspect of yourself suspended in time and space.

​> The audience’s resulting dispersal through space and time leads to a sporadic and unpredictable set of interactions, which can anchor habits of continual checking or an intensified susceptibility to push notifications (part of how platforms try to elicit compulsive engagement). The result is that we can’t help but be aware of ourselves through these platforms as continual performers, moment by moment.

​> What kind of self derives from this condition? Imagine a wedding photographer who circulates, trying to capture candid images of spontaneous or unscripted moments. “Act naturally,” they might joke, before encouraging everyone to “pretend I’m not here,” ironically vocalizing the impossible possibility to diffuse some of the pressure of doing as they say. Now imagine that you are that photographer, but that it is also your wedding. And imagine also that the wedding never ends.

​> To borrow sociologist Erving Goffman’s terminology, broadcasting on social media amounts to a substantial expansion of what he called our “front stage,” where we are consciously and continually involved in the work of impression management

​> But they have really mastered the art of transforming the backstage into another front stage.

​> We can understand backstage experience, then, as a respite not only from the gaze of an audience but also the gaze we must fix on ourselves to pull off our performances.

​> The algorithms that ostensibly reveal what your “true” or “authentic” self would choose for itself feed off the very exhaustion that the platforms generate, offering refuge from the burden of identity work in the automation of the will.

​> Life needs the protection of nonawareness.
l-m-sacasas  identity  social  reflection  burnout 
3 days ago
Understanding Makes the Mind Lazy
> platforms have to act as though their algorithms work and don’t work at the same time, and this equivocation fosters a paranoia about how algorithms work.

> The point of advertising, after all, is not to nail down what people are, as if that were static; it’s to shift currents of demand, to alter behavior patterns. But the logic of data profiling uses the past to repeat it as the future.

> This mystification is not an unfortunate side effect; it’s the value Facebook adds. Users are isolated from each other so they can feel as though they are the implied subject of all the discourse they experience on the site — so that they can be targeted in “one-to-one brand building” campaigns. Users get to feel important, singled out, worthy of decoding, and at the same time they get to interpret whatever they read through the lens of “Why did the algorithm choose this for me? What does this say about me and my tastes?” But that works only through an effort of disavowal: You have to feel that the algorithm is right enough to cater to you but not powerful enough to control you (even while it controls all those “indoctrinated peers”).

> In this London Review of Books essay about Brexit,William Davies offers this description of accelerated finance:

> The mentality of the high-frequency trader or hedge fund manager is wholly focused on leaving on better terms than one arrived, with minimum delay or friction in between. To the speculator, falling prices present just as lucrative an opportunity as rising prices (given the practice of ‘shorting’ financial assets), meaning that instability in general is attractive. As long as nothing ever stays the same, you can exit on better terms than you entered. The only unprofitable scenario is stasis.

> In a sense, platform paranoia is akin to market volatility; it reflects and promotes a high-frequency trading of sorts in various propositions, accelerating cycles of belief and skepticism as we churn through a much higher volume of information. Advertising is more likely to be effective amid these conditions, where it seems that everybody and not just marketers is being manipulative and deceptive.

> How we are targeted is always incomplete and inaccurate, but these inaccuracies in themselves can still drive and reshape behavior. Being targeted itself affects the targets, regardless of what is targeted at them, or if anything hits.

> They want to sell control over that connection, the moment at which your feelings become actions in the world. (Advertisers understand that link between feeling and acting entirely as a matter of “conversion rates” — when you actually buy something.)

> When we remember our lives authentically, we ask a fundamental question: Why did I remember this thing, at this moment? The “Why now?” question gives memory its meaning. Facebook randomizes and decontextualizes memory and detaches it from our current self. And why would I want to know what I looked like 10 years ago?
rob-horning  targeting  facebook 
3 days ago
Karen Uhlenbeck, Uniter of Geometry and Analysis, Wins Abel Prize
> Uhlenbeck, who was born in 1942 in Cleveland, was a voracious reader as a child, but she didn’t become deeply interested in mathematics until she enrolled in the freshman honors math course at the University of Michigan. “The structure, elegance and beauty of mathematics struck me immediately, and I lost my heart to it,”

​> Mathematics research had another feature that appealed to her at the time: It is something you can work on in solitude, if you wish.
karen-uhlenbeck  math  abel-prize  isolation  solitude 
4 days ago
The New Social Network That Isn’t New at All
> It can be more than just a creative endeavor: Newsletters can make a fine one-person business.

​> To be clear: I don’t intend to give up my low-grade Twitter addiction. I have built meaningful friendships on the platform, and it’s been a pathway for people to discover my work.

​> Instead, I’ll save it for my newsletter following — the one that belongs to me.
newsletter  mike-isaac  substack 
4 days ago
“Sleeping” Under The Sheets
> Even as I grew out of midday naps, I had to find creative ways to stay up reading past my bedtime.

​> As a young bookworm, almost nothing could stop me from reading when I was supposed to be doing anything else, sleeping included.
jillian-meehan  reading  childhood  sleep 
4 days ago
“muscle recruitment mostly...this is heart of why observed peak VO2 consumption in cyclists < runners < nordic skiers. More muscle recruitment = higher absolute VO2 max uptake.”
> muscle recruitment mostly...this is heart of why observed peak VO2 consumption in cyclists < runners < nordic skiers. More muscle recruitment = higher absolute VO2 max uptake.
steve-mieczkowski  vo2  cycling 
4 days ago
How Much Money Means You Don’t Have to Worry?
> A little struggle never really hurt anyone, but too much struggle can strangle anything. Even a 30-year relationship. My parents argued constantly about bills for the last 20 years of their relationship, maybe especially when the argument wasn’t about the bills. I watched their marriage burn until it fizzled out into two adults who lived under the same roof and only communicated through their four kids.

​> The things people forget about when they try to tell you money can’t buy happiness.

​> Really, in the end, all I want is enough money to never worry about money. I just don’t know if that amount exists.
caragh-poh  money  finances  salary 
4 days ago
“(like it says in the thing, this is an in-progress piece of something much longer/bigger I'm working on and a lot of these ideas are still me spitballing/working through stuff, so if it feels incomplete, well, that's the fun of a newsletter I guess)”
“(like it says in the thing, this is an in-progress piece of something much longer/bigger I'm working on and a lot of these ideas are still me spitballing/working through stuff, so if it feels incomplete, well, that's the fun of a newsletter I guess)”
helena-fitzgerald  in-progress  newsletter  drafts 
4 days ago
“Meritocracy -- granting access to valuable resources on the basis of impartial tests of competence like the SATs -- is not egalitarian, because financial resources can be put towards getting better at any skill. The rich will tend to do better than the
“Meritocracy -- granting access to valuable resources on the basis of impartial tests of competence like the SATs -- is not egalitarian, because financial resources can be put towards getting better at any skill. The rich will tend to do better than the poor by default.”
sarah-constantin  sat  testing  college-admissions 
4 days ago
The Hidden Variable in Opportunity Cost
> This changes how impact is calculated, and how you should think about opportunity cost. If you aren’t considering pace, you will be misled into thinking that time isn’t relative, which is an expensive miscalculation (sort of like in Interstellar, when they get stuck on the water planet and 1 hour = 7 years).

​> What used to take days, now took months. What used to take a conversation, now took six meetings.

> I had no choice but to quit, as every additional day was actually costing me months (relative to working on the outside).
alex-cornell  opportunity-cost  jobs  efficiency  impact  scale 
4 days ago
Death by a thousand qualifiers
> How does anyone write anything for online, where you have to assume everyone is going to read everything you write in bad faith? I am so tired of wrapping every sentence in qualifiers and building the context for every statement. This could be 100 words, yet I am at 1500.
can-duruk  writing  qualifications 
5 days ago
#81: 4:33 ‘til Infinity
> headphones reposition us each within our own unique reality.
drew-austin  silence  headphones  urban  cities  nyc 
7 days ago
Give Me What You Want — Real Life
> Companies don’t sell objects so much as they sell an idealized lifestyle, an opportunity for consumers to improve themselves by participating in the belief system that a brand evokes.

> might be understood as the Spotification of retail: Consumers pay by the month to receive a stream of algorithmically chosen goods.

> a commercial logic that prioritizes access over ownership, breadth over depth of consumption, and instant ease of use over more deliberate exploration as a prerequisite for enjoyment.

> One of the defining tenets of Spotification is what digital anthropologist Lane DeNicola calls a “shift from commodity ownership to commodified experience.” Paid subscribers to Spotify are not buying a bounded physical or digital item, writes DeNicola, but rather “a predetermined amount of time during which they have access to the entirety of the vast online library of music.” These subscribers are also buying limited-time, on-demand access to black-boxed algorithmic curation systems, which allows platform logic to take precedence over record companies’ conventional A&R concerns in the formation of taste and culture. Engagement with the wider platform and its algorithms replaces engagement with particular artists or songs as consumers seek to further develop their tastes, the better versions of themselves.

> and the promise of perpetual discovery.

> Stressed human beings, seeking more free and “personal” time, become the upper management for their own fleet of contractors; in Hochschild’s words, “the most intuitive and emotional of human acts … become work for hire.” This triggers a slippery-slope effect. “To finance these extra services, we work longer hours,” Hochschild explained in an op-ed for the New York Times. “This leaves less time to spend with family, friends and neighbors; we become less likely to call on them for help, and they on us. And, the more we rely on the market, the more hooked we become on its promises.”

> Yet this newfound flexibility ultimately becomes infiltrated by further anxiety over the vast opportunities that remain to become even “better,” in the pursuit of peak performance.
cherie-hu  spotify  subscriptions  consumerism  style  taste 
8 days ago
Why We Like Distractions
> We procrastinate to protect ourselves.​

> Distractions allow us to delay the moment of truth where we need to show who we really are, what we can really do, where we need to expose ourselves, prove ourselves, and ultimately face the mirror of reality.
procrastination  ia  distraction  writing 
9 days ago
What’s Next for Coda?
> when you build an amazing product that helps people be happier doing their jobs every day, you’ll find the customers you need to keep it going.

​> But that’s OK, because crushing anything has never really been a goal. Instead, we’re working hard to give you something really amazing. Something you’ll use every day. Something worth switching to.
panic  coda  editor  ide  mac 
9 days ago
The simplicity of dropping Google in 2018
> Switching off of Google in 2018 is easy because you’ve probably abandoned most of their products anyway, and the ones you’re still using are stagnating.
tom-macwright  google  fastmail  email 
10 days ago
Website Subscriptions Are Not Dead
> We should likely stop talking about RSS. We need to simply start calling RSS “Subscribing”.
nick-heer  rss  subscriptions 
10 days ago
Thirty
> I’d rather spend my time with my family or doing things outside or learning new things than making software every waking moment.

> Now when I work on things on the side, it’s because I want to.
sam-soffes  birthday  30 
10 days ago
Try the Opposite
“Our habits tend to fall into local maxima. We choose well compared to similar alternatives, but ignore options that are totally different yet possibly better. Machine learning algorithms avoid local maxima by occasionally testing random permutations, with techniques like simulated annealing.”
allen-pike  habits  opposite  local-maxima 
10 days ago
“i have been one of those that sent the email more often than I should have, and it took me way too long to realize those outcomes arent great either not sending it can, at least, prevent/postpone the cognitive weight of working through whatever gets st
“They had to develop cultures of safety. That often means specific social safeguards.

Those ‘ossified corporate structures’ that Silicon Valley hates so much because they ‘keep you from moving fast’? Yeah, a lot of them exist to keep top brass from doing hideously stupid things.”
james-dennis  friendship  communication  email 
11 days ago
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