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A Tale of Two Metrics
August 7, 2017 | | RetailNext | Ray Hartjen, Director, Content Marketing & Public Relations.

Traffic can’t alone measure the effectiveness of demand creation efforts, but some well-placed math can show retailers strong correlations over a myriad of relevant variables. More over, as my colleague Shelley E. Kohan pointed out in her post earlier this summer, “Expanding the Scope of Metrics,” Traffic is foundational for meaningful metrics like Conversion and Sales Yield (Sales per Shopper), key measurements that help managers make daily decisions on the floor from tailoring merchandising displays to allocating staffing and refining associate training.
With metrics, it’s important to remember there’re different strokes for different folks, with different measurements critical for different functions, much like financial accounting and managerial accounting serve different masters. Today’s “big data” age allows retailers to inexpensively collect, synthesize, analyze and report almost unbelievable amounts of data from an equally almost unbelievable number of data streams. Paramount is to get the right information in front of the right people at the right time.
Sometimes, the right data is Sales per Square Foot, and it certainly makes for a nice headline. But, not to be outshined, other instances call for Traffic. As Chitra Balasubramanian, RetailNext’s Head of Business Analytics, points out in the same Sourcing Journal Online article, “Traffic equals opportunity. Retailers should take advantage of store visits with loyalty programs, heightened customer service, and a great in-store experience to create a long-lasting relationship with that customer to ensure repeat visits.”
metrics  sales  foot_traffic  retailers  inexpensive  massive_data_sets  data  creating_demand  correlations  experiential_marketing  in-store  mathematics  loyalty_management  the_right_people  sales_per_square_foot 
august 2017 by jerryking
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