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The Summer of Love: A Walking Tour of San Francisco, 50 Years Later
Unfurling from the eastern border of San Francisco’s Golden Gate Park, the Haight served as the epicenter of America’s 1960s counterculture movement. “The Haight-Ashbury was the product of teen rebellion against 1950s’ regimentation and the Vietnam War,” said a guide for the local Flower Power Walking Tour who goes by the name Stannous Flouride. “The anarchic aspect was seen as a threat against the establishment but ultimately had a profound influence on American culture.” Cheap rents, more than anything else, drew the first wave of bohemians in the early 1960s. Legions followed, cresting in 1967 when some 100,000 students, musicians and others flocked to San Francisco for a summer of drug-enhanced communing and revelry that horrified parents. This year, to mark the anniversary, events from concerts to art exhibits are being staged throughout the Bay Area (see summeroflove2017.com for details).

Hit songs of 1967 included the Airplane’s “White Rabbit,” “San Franciscan Nights” (inspired by a night Eric Burdon spent with Janis Joplin) and the blissed-out ballad “San Francisco (Be Sure to Wear Flowers in Your Hair).”
1967  San_Francisco  psychedelic  summertime  epicenters  neighbourhoods  gentrification  bohemians  things_to_do  anniversaries  counterculture 
may 2017 by jerryking
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