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Righting Wrongs and Generating Attention for Art of the African Diaspora
OCT. 16, 2016 | The New York Times | By TED LOOS.

A profile of Pamela J. Joyner, a prolific art collector and supporter of artists of African descent..... Later, Ms. Joyner donated money to buy another Gilliam, “Whirlirama” (1970), and next year there are plans to exhibit both when the Met reinstalls its modern collection. “Pamela is such an informed champion of her artists,” Ms. Wagstaff said.

That trip to Washington was one of the many ways that Ms. Joyner, 58, exerts her power as an art-world influence behind the scenes. She has relinquished a successful business career to become what she calls a full-time “mission-driven” collector of a very specific niche: Abstract art by African-Americans and members of the global African diaspora. Now she leverages her relationships with the Met in New York, the Tate in London, the Art Institute in Chicago and the San Francisco Museum of Modern Art to help these artists gain traction in the wider world.

“It’s no less ambitious than an effort to reframe art history,” said Ms. Joyner, who sees herself as righting a wrong. “First, to include more broadly those who have been overlooked — and, for those with visibility, to steward and contextualize those careers.”....“There was a keen sense in my household that you had to be prepared for whatever was going to happen,” Ms. Joyner said. “You needed these literacies, and cultural literacy was one of them.”
African-Americans  Diaspora  art  artists  collectors  museums  overlooked  philanthropy  leadership  patronage  high_net_worth  benefactors  cultural_literacy  women  marginalization  Pamela_Joyner  stewardship  reframing  mission-driven  champions  art_history  exclusion  prolificacy 
october 2016 by jerryking
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