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Black Cancer Matters
MARCH 15, 2018 | The New York Times | By SUSAN GUBAR.

the economic consequences of racial discrimination increase cancer risk.....putting into play the words “race” and “cancer,” .....ponder the impact of race on cancer outcomes nationally — disentangled from local ecological factors. The big picture is grim.

A 2016 report of the American Cancer Society states that the “five-year relative survival is lower for blacks than whites for most cancers at each stage of diagnosis.” African-American men, for example, are twice as likely to die from prostate cancer. Experts continue to debate why, even as many ascribe this scandalous phenomenon to inequalities in access to screening and treatment.

In women’s cancer, the mortality gap has widened. According to the 2016-18 report on Cancer Facts and Figures for African-Americans, “despite lower incidence rates for breast and uterine cancers, black women have death rates for these cancers that are 42% and 92% higher, respectively, than white women.” Investigators connect the ghastly numbers to the usual socioeconomic discrepancies but also to biological differences in the malignancies of black women.

With regard to breast cancer, is the mortality gap related to a greater percentage of black women than white women contending with an aggressive form of the disease that lacks estrogen receptors?

Dr. Otis Webb Brawley, the chief medical officer of the American Cancer Society, rejects an explanation based on “biological difference,” pointing instead to dietary disparities....“The black-white gap in the onset of menstruation and body weight has dramatically widened, which means that the disease disparities will widen also.”

Disadvantaged Americans consume more calories and carbohydrates, “the sort of food that is available in poor areas of inner cities,”..... “Poverty is a carcinogen.”

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isn't just about race-- watch the trailer in which blacks and whites say the very same things about being poisoned by the Koch brothers' companies. This is a story about social justice and lack of sufficient government regulation of the enterprises owned by the "donor" class that owns most of our politicians. The most accurate predictor of people's life expectancy is their zip code [http://fortune.com/2017/05/08/us-life-expectancy-study/]. If you life in a polluted poisoned environment, you will suffer the consequences regardless of race.
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African-Americans  cancers  economically_disadvantaged  mortality  prostate  racial_discrimination  racial_disparities  the_big_picture  women 
march 2018 by jerryking
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