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Mentally Strong People: The 13 Things They Avoid
11/18/2013| - Forbes| Cheryl Conner, Contributor

For all the time executives spend concerned about physical strength and health, when it comes down to it, mental strength can mean even more. Particularly for entrepreneurs, numerous articles talk about critical characteristics of mental strength—tenacity, “grit,” optimism, and an unfailing ability as Forbes contributor David Williams says, to “fail up.”...we can also define mental strength by identifying the things mentally strong individuals don’t do.
1. Waste Time Feeling Sorry for Themselves.
2. Give Away Their Power.
3. Shy Away from Change.
4. Waste Energy on Things They Can’t Control.

5. Worry About Pleasing Others.
6. Fear Taking Calculated Risks.
7. Dwell on the Past.
8. Make the Same Mistakes Over and Over.
9. Resent Other People’s Success.
10. Give Up After Failure.
11. Fear Alone Time.
12. Feel the World Owes Them Anything.
13. Expect Immediate Results.
grit  resilience  personality_types/traits  character_traits  habits  inspiration  beyond_one's_control  affirmations  overachievers  span_of_control  high-achieving 
december 2013
Use GO trains instead of building downtown relief line, report suggests
Dec 11 2013 | Toronto Star |By Laura Kane News reporter, Published on Wed .
DRL  transit  GO 
december 2013
Downtown relief line name alternatives sought
Dec 04 2013 | Toronto Star |By: Tess Kalinowski Transportation reporter, Published on Wed .
DRL  transit  Toronto 
december 2013
As Mandela is remembered, a moment of praise for F.W. de Klerk - The Globe and Mail
BARBARA MCDOUGALL

Special to The Globe and Mail

Published Wednesday, Dec. 11 2013,
South_Africa  history  politicians 
december 2013
Why 3-D Printing Is a Serious Business Tool - The CIO Report - WSJ
December 9, 2013 | WSJ | By Barry Jaruzelski and Richard Holman
3-D 
december 2013
Review of Space Monkey Peer-to-Peer Digital Storage System - WSJ.com
Dec. 10, 2013 | WSJ| By Katherine Boehret.

The $199 Space Monkey storage solution offers two ways to store files: Remote storage, which uses a peer-to-peer system, and local storage, which uses this one-terabyte hard drive, above, that plugs into a wireless router. Space Monkey
P2P  peer-to-peer  cloud_computing  digital_storage 
december 2013
There needs to be a sober examination of our state of affairs Georgetown, Guyana
December 6, 2013 | Stabroek News | Frank Fyffe.

Said Fenty: “I now lament the stark fact that politics, governance, discrimination, corruption, management of resources and lack of employment among other factors, have caused young Guyanese to yearn to leave this homeland still rich with resources. Do you realise what national hopelessness means amongst the larger portion of our population?” But who can honestly look you in the eye and deny that? And I’m not denying the hard, perilous and precarious times many are faced with abroad, but the very fact that they crave madly the opportunity to leave paints a picture and tells a different story ‒ too many things are amiss and adrift.
Guyana  letters_to_the_editor  failed_states  misgovernance  hopelessness  brain_drain  emigration  politics  governance  discrimination  corruption  mismanagement  unemployment  precarious 
december 2013
Why Machiavelli Still Matters - NYTimes.com
By JOHN SCOTT and ROBERT ZARETSKY
Published: December 9, 2013

“The Prince” is a manual for those who wish to win and keep power. The Renaissance was awash in such how-to guides, but Machiavelli’s was different. To be sure, he counsels a prince on how to act toward his enemies, using force and fraud in war. But his true novelty resides in how we should think about our friends. It is at the book’s heart, in the chapter devoted to this issue, that Machiavelli proclaims his originality.

Set aside what you would like to imagine about politics, Machiavelli writes, and instead go straight to the truth of how things really work, or what he calls the “effectual truth.” [Effectual truth means not only that the truth will have an effect, a consequence, but also that its effect will show. Those who try to live by a profession of good will fail and be shown to fail. ] You will see that allies in politics, whether at home or abroad, are not friends....Machiavelli teaches that in a world where so many are not good, you must learn to be able to not be good. The virtues taught in our secular and religious schools are incompatible with the virtues one must practice to safeguard those same institutions. The power of the lion and the cleverness of the fox: These are the qualities a leader must harness to preserve the republic.

For such a leader, allies are friends when it is in their interest to be. (We can, with difficulty, accept this lesson when embodied by a Charles de Gaulle; we have even greater difficulty when it is taught by, say, Hamid Karzai.) What’s more, Machiavelli says, leaders must at times inspire fear not only in their foes but even in their allies — and even in their own ministers.
cynicism  Niccolò_Machiavelli  Medici  indispensable  advice  friendships  politics  power  virtues  interests  consigliere  leaders  self-interest  fear  adaptability  political_power  self-preservation  effectiveness  Charles_de_Gaulle  negative_space  primers 
december 2013
Case Study: Edgy Ad Campaign, With Hefty Digital, Traditional PR Support, Helps the Pistachio Come Out of Its Shell
Timeframe: March - Dec. 2009

In early 2009, life wasn't all it was cracked up to be for the pistachio. In March of that year, the FDA issued a precautionary, voluntary recall for the green nut for...
product_recalls  public_relations  commodities  branding  brands  transparency  crisis_management  FDA  marketing  Lynda_Resnick  social_media  funnies  contests  virality 
december 2013
DESIGN: Brand design--the antidote to category camouflage
Jan 9, 2009 | Marketing Week | Andy Black.

As budgets are cut and tough questions are asked, design can make a difference by getting a brand noticed, standing out from the competition and engaging ...
branding  brands  design  commodities  advertising  hard_questions 
december 2013
Chilled champion
Jun 27, 2007 | Marketing | Charles Gemma.

=============================================
Richard Tolley has no interest in golf, and has never played on the rather odd mini-course on Dairy Crest's ...
marketing  dairy  branding  brands 
december 2013
Tart Cherries Grown in the States of Michigan, et al.; Final Free and Restricted Percentages for the 2006-2007 Crop Year for Tart Cherries
Mar 23, 2007 | The Federal Register / FIND72.

==============================================

Aggregate demand for tart cherries and tart cherry products tends to be relatively stable from ye...
commodities  agriculture  farming  brands  branding 
december 2013
Co-op Delivers Atlantic 'Gold'
Anonymous. Canadian Grocer119.9 (Nov 2005): 12.


John Harvie, CEO of Co-op Atlantic, says development of the Rochdale Gold demonstrates the forward-looking, consumer-sensitive character of today's...
potatoes  innovation  agriculture  commodities  brands  branding  retailers 
december 2013
Smoked Fish Pâté - The Globe and Mail
Lucy Waverman

Special to The Globe and Mail

Published Tuesday, Nov. 26 2013, 5
cured_and_smoked  fish  recipes  Lucy_Waverman  pâtés_&_terrines  howto 
december 2013
FBI’s search for ‘Mo,’ suspect in bomb threats, highlights use of malware for surveillance - The Washington Post
FBI’s search for ‘Mo,’ suspect in bomb threats, highlights use of malware for surveillance
By Craig Timberg and Ellen Nakashima, Published: December 6
FBI  surveillance  malware 
december 2013
The Path to Happy Employment, Contact by Contact on LinkedIn - NYTimes.com
By ERIC A. TAUB
Published: December 4, 2013

LinkedIn, the networking site for professionals, has become a vast business gathering place. With more than 259 million members in over 200 countries, LinkedIn offers users, most of whom pay nothing for the service, a chance to hone and increase their contacts. Users can also limit their connections to others who can best help them professionally....First, the basics: LinkedIn allows users to create a compelling text-and-multimedia narrative of their life and work. It can be updated at will, can be any length and it will often pop up in a Web search of the user’s name. Add multimedia, such as slide presentations and links to examples of your work.

Use the headline space (right under your name) to create a compelling statement about yourself. Instead of “third assistant stock clerk,” be creative. “Inventory manager with over 20 years’ experience” will generate more views. ....As Ted Prodromou, a San Francisco consultant and author of a book on how to use LinkedIn, says, “What would you type in, to find you?.....To avoid embarrassing congratulatory emails for something you haven’t done, turn off those notification settings before you post your profile .... To avoid embarrassing congratulatory emails for something you haven’t done, turn off those notification settings before you post your profile. To do so, hover your cursor over your picture in the upper right. Then click “Review,” next to “Privacy and Settings.”

On the “Profile” tab, you can turn off these “activity broadcasts” or decide who should see them if you want to leave them on. This is also where you can choose to let others know you have viewed their profile (or prefer to be anonymous), determine how much of your profile strangers can see, automatically send profile updates to your Twitter account and other options.
LinkedIn  productivity  howto  JCK  job_opportunities  job_search 
december 2013
Palantir Reloads for the Corporation - NYTimes.com
December 5, 2013, 10:00 am Comment
Palantir Reloads for the Corporation
By QUENTIN HARDY

Palantir Technologies is a big data software company whose roots in government security mask a growing corporate presence. It is also getting a larger war chest to go with that growth....The company’s initial customers included several United States defense and intelligence agencies. But today, more than 60 percent of its revenue is from commercial sources, according to the Palantir executive, who spoke on the condition on anonymity.

While most big data companies create databases that gather large and diverse information sources, then apply pattern-matching software to see if something interesting pops up, Palantir’s technology tries to encode a human element. It has worked on augmenting the way humans in a given field parse information by studying specialists in such areas as fraud spotting, or doctors who isolate outbreaks of food poisoning. The software then augments those human pattern-finding skills.

While this has proved effective for finding insurgent bomb makers and missing children, it also seems to work in finance, health care and other industries.
Palantir  data  data_mining  artificial_intelligence  large_companies  massive_data_sets  security_&_intelligence  pattern_recognition  information_sources 
december 2013
Ryerson president Sheldon Levy prepares to say farewell - The Globe and Mail
TARA DESCHAMPS

The Globe and Mail

Published Friday, Dec. 06 2013,

You’ve worked at many universities, including the University of Toronto, York University and the University of Ontario Institute of Technology. What sets Ryerson apart from the others?

With Ryerson, what stands out for me all the time is the students. They’re such a creative, innovative, entrepreneurial group of students that [are] very supportive, and it’s been really a delight to work at Ryerson … It’s a [very] kind community.

What do you think your role has been in changing Ryerson’s image?

The role of a president is a lot of sales and marketing. I think that I have always paid attention to building the reputation of the university, and put that as a primary objective, whether that was the members of the royal society or attracting the best faculty and students. The reputation is not a function of the president, but is a function of everyone at the university, so in some sense you are the chief cheerleader.
Ryerson  retirement  CEOs  Colleges_&_Universities  deanships  exits 
december 2013
In South Africa, ‘a lot to be grateful for’ - The Globe and Mail
GEOFFREY YORK

SOWETO, SOUTH AFRICA — The Globe and Mail

Published Friday, Dec. 06 2013

The government announced on Friday that Mr. Mandela will be laid to rest on Dec. 15 in his childhood village of Qunu, in the beautiful rolling hills of the Eastern Cape. A huge memorial service will be held on Tuesday at a 95,000-seat soccer stadium on the edge of Johannesburg. Then his body will lie in state for three days at the Union Buildings in Pretoria, so that hundreds of thousands of South Africans can bid him farewell before the state funeral.
Nelson_Mandela  South_Africa  memorials  obituaries  Geoffrey_York  Soweto 
december 2013
Want the job? You need to play the hiring game - The Globe and Mail
LEAH EICHLER

Special to The Globe and Mail

Published Friday, Dec. 06 2013,

If you are sending a résumé to a database, without the benefit of a relationship with the hiring manager, you are already at a distinct disadvantage.
Managing_Your_Career  résumés  hiring  job_search  personal_branding  personal_relationships  applicant-tracking_systems  disadvantages 
december 2013
Newton Glassman, a private man in the stressful world of private equity - The Globe and Mail
Dec. 06 2013 | The Globe and Mail| BOYD ERMAN.

Newton Glassman has spent the past 11 years running hard to build what has become Canada’s second-largest private equity firm....Mr. Glassman’s firm, Catalyst Capital Group Inc., now runs $4-billion of assets that it mostly puts to work in messy distressed situations, trying to take control of struggling companies and turn them around....Investing in distressed debt is a gritty, confrontational business. Mr. Glassman's firm typically buys bonds issued by a troubled company, spending countless hours searching for the securities that will provide the most influence, then tries to gain control when the company is restructured. The goal is to buy in cheap, seize power if necessary, fix the business and reap the rewards. It can be a rough job, because there is rarely enough money to go around and someone usually loses out.

When he was at Cerberus, founder Steve Feinberg warned him about the personal cost of building a firm, telling him: “There is a massive difference between being one of the key players and being THE guy in charge.”

Catalyst’s charitable arm also is building a knowledge centre that will work with universities to provide investors, lawyers and judges with more education about credit markets. Mr. Glassman has harsh words for the way credit markets sometimes work in Canada, as judges have sometimes upset the traditional order of restructurings...

Mr. Glassman says that at the time, he thought Mr. Feinberg was “just yakking.” But if he knew then what he knows now about building his own firm, he says he probably would have stayed at Cerberus. “The job of being the guy is if you take your responsibilities seriously, it is all encompassing.”
private_equity  Newton_Glassman  Bay_Street  Boyd_Erman  Catalyst  personal_cost  distressed_debt  turnarounds  Cerberus  vulture_investing  restructurings 
december 2013
The man with the key to China: Barrick Gold’s quest to open new doors - The Globe and Mail
Dec. 06 2013 | The Globe and Mail | RACHELLE YOUNGLAI - MINING REPORTER.

The former Goldman Sachs president has spent more than 20 years working with Chinese policymakers. He shares Mr. Munk’s vision of turning Barrick into a diversified mining giant and tapping China to join the effort...Mr. Thornton said his Barrick talks with the Chinese have been with the highest levels of the communist government right on down the system. He stresses he does not want what he calls a “transactional” or one-off deal with the Chinese. He wants to build an enduring relationship with the government...Mr. Thornton envisions Barrick first doing one “thing that is relatively modest” with the Chinese. For example, he says Barrick could consider a Chinese construction company for Pascua Lama. Mr. Thornton has not spoken to any such companies about the South American mine and says it’s only an example.

Michael Evans, a Goldman vice-chairman who worked with Mr. Thornton for years in London and Asia, describes Mr. Thornton as a hugely strategic operator who “loves flawless execution” and prefers to work behind the scenes...In the mid-1990s, Mr. Thornton got wind that the vice-premier at the time, Zhu Rongji, wanted to reform some of the country’s state-owned telecoms.

Mr. Thornton, who had taken Britain’s Vodafone public in the late-1980s, arranged for a meeting with the number 2 banker at the newly formed state-owned Chinese investment bank, a Chinese national who did not speak English.

Through a translator late at night in Beijing, Mr. Thornton said: “Here’s the real situation, you call yourself a banker and yet you know nothing about banking. I am in charge of Goldman Sachs Asia and China and I know nothing about any one of those. So we have a perfect marriage here. You’re going to teach me China and I am going to teach you banking and I am going to make you look like a hero in front of Zhu Rongji and everyone else who is important to you. And I don’t need any visibility, credit, anything. All I want to do is understand China out of this whole process.”

Mr. Thornton stressed his experience with Vodafone...
Barrick  gold  mining  John_Thornton  CEOs  relationships  Goldman_Sachs  personal_connections  Tsinghua  boards_&_directors_&_governance  barter  transactional_relationships 
december 2013
Summary of my D. Sumptom feedback
Summary of my David Sumptom feedback:

q In order for others to promote you, you need to turn your language around to describe who you can help, the type of problems you can solve and how someone m...
feedback  personal_branding  websites  JCK  Managing_Your_Career  templates  advice  Ivey  alumni 
december 2013
Noel's Pitch Letter
steal elements of his note for your own purposes. Look at the way he helps you to recognize a 'Noel-solvable' problem. Look at the succinct way he conveys the unique 'Noel-selling-proposition'. He ma...
Noel_Desautels  Managing_Your_Career  networking  JCK  pitches  feedback  templates  value_propositions 
december 2013
How to Write a Coverletter--How it differs from a Resumé
Brian, I am fine with OK-ing the use of my name here. We have different writing styles, which is to be expected. However, it seems that we have radically different thoughts on the role of a cover l...
JCK  coverletters  first90days  résumés  Managing_Your_Career  feedback  templates 
december 2013
How To Tell What Patents Are Worth
6/25/2013 @ 11:13AM 5,390 views
How To Tell What Patents Are Worth
2 comments, 2 called-out
Comment Now
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This article is by Joseph G. Hadzima, Jr.
patents  valuations 
december 2013
Why can’t today’s graduates get hired? -
Dec. 05 2013 | The Globe and Mail | by Margaret Wente.

“Everywhere, employers are looking to recruit young people with a strong complement of soft skills, such as the ability to communicate, think critically and work in teams,” John Manley, president of the Canadian Council of Chief Executives, said in a recent speech.

The real skills gap, business leaders say, is not the shortage of oil-field engineers and the glut of history BAs. It’s about the shortage of young people who are good at problem-solving, communication, teamwork, time management, persistence, loyalty and dedication. Survey after survey reports that businesses can’t find enough workers who are motivated, flexible and organized. As a recent piece in Time magazine declared, “The entry-level candidates who are on tap to join the ranks of full-time work are clueless about the fundamentals of office life. ”...“As recently as 10 years ago, organizations would hire for potential,” Ms. Moses told me. “But now they want people who can hit the ground running.” Employers have also become extremely risk-averse about new hires – another factor that stacks the deck against the twentysomethings. It’s hard to prove that you can do the job if nobody will give you the first one. As for the soft-skills gap, she thinks it’s overblown. For starters, today’s young adults have collaborated and worked in teams all their lives.

The trouble is that few companies do training any more, even the kind of informal short-term training that can break in someone new.
Barbara_Moses  Communicating_&_Connecting  critical_thinking  grit  hiring  job_search  John_Manley  loyalty  millennials  Margaret_Wente  new_graduates  persistence  problem_solving  skills  short-sightedness  skills_gap  teams  time-management  young_people 
december 2013
The damaging legacy of discovery learning - The Globe and Mail
Konrad Yakabuski

The Globe and Mail

Published Thursday, Dec. 05 2013

The 2012 math rankings from the Programme for International Student Assessment, in which Canada slipped to 13th place, are based on average test scores..... it’s important to distinguish between what Canada’s notable drop in international student rankings can and can’t tell us about how our kids our doing.

First, some context: The two most damaging developments to hit public education have been the power of teaching fads and the proliferation of standardized testing. Fads are dangerous because they are often based on shaky hypotheses about how children learn, and are blindly embraced by impressionable teachers keen to make a difference but lacking in the experience and training needed to transmit knowledge or the talent to light the spark in their students.

Standardized testing is not bad in itself. But education policy has become hostage to testing data. The result is a disproportionate focus on raising the average scores of students from disadvantaged backgrounds and less emphasis on producing top students, regardless of income....As education historian and influential U.S. testing critic Diane Ravitch blogged after the latest PISA results were released, “what we cannot measure matters more. The scores tell us nothing about students’ imagination, their drive, their ability to ask good questions, their insight, their inventiveness, their creativity.”....[ Albert Einstein once said, “Not everything that can be counted counts, and not everything that counts can be counted.” Although many market research experts would say that quantitative research is the safest bet when one has limited resources, it can be dangerous to assume that it is always the best option.]. The decade-long drop in math scores among students outside Quebec corresponds with the spread of “discovery learning” in the classroom. The idea that students must be free to solve problems based on their unique learning styles popped up in the education literature in late 1960s and went mainstream in the 1990s. But there was a huge revolt when U.S. parents discovered Johnny couldn’t multiply; the pendulum has since swung back to teaching the basics.

Yet most English-Canadian school boards embraced some version of discovery learning even after it was being questioned south of the border. It fit with the “equity” mantra that permeated the jargon of education bureaucrats and ministers. “Reaching every student” became the theme of education policies aimed at bringing up the bottom with “student-centred learning.”
Konrad_Yakabuski  education  high_schools  rankings  PISA  STEM  mathematics  test-score_data  standardized_testing  metrics  students  imagination  drive  questions  insights  inventiveness  creativity  discoveries 
december 2013
Why some countries are winning and others are losing in school rankings - The Globe and Mail
DOUG SAUNDERS
Why some countries are winning and others are losing in school rankings Add to ...
Subscribers Only

The Globe and Mail

Published Tuesday, Dec. 03 2013,
rankings  high_schools  mathematics  Doug_Saunders  PISA  test-score_data 
december 2013
New documents suggest Rob Ford may have tried to buy video - The Globe and Mail
RENATA D’ALIESIO AND ELIZABETH CHURCH

The Globe and Mail

Published Wednesday, Dec. 04 2013
Rob_Ford 
december 2013
The CBC: What’s it good for, without hockey? - The Globe and Mail
Nov. 29 2013 | The Globe and Mail | editorial

Losing hockey is the best thing that could have happened to the CBC. A national institution that long ago lost its way has been given the chance – possibly its last chance – to find its soul. NHL hockey, the most popular pastime in this country, doesn’t need the CBC. And the CBC, if it’s to be what a public broadcaster should be, doesn’t need the NHL.

If the CBC did not exist, would we create it? And to do what?

The strongest argument for the CBC goes something like this: There are some public goods that the free market will not deliver, or will not deliver well enough, and so we create public institutions to do the job. Think of museums, libraries and parks. These would be very different without public support, and in some cases they might not exist at all. There’s a compelling logic to taxpayer backing for the National Gallery of Canada or the Canadian War Museum, or hundreds of other cultural institutions and historical sites. The CBC is, in part, such an institution....Hockey reveals what should have been obvious all along: Popular programming doesn’t need taxpayer support. We don’t need a CBC to compete with the private sector. We need a CBC that goes where the private sector isn’t, doing important things that are necessary but may be less popular.

Consider arts and cultural programming – something that CBC television used to do a lot more of, and then in recent years stepped back from. Or educational and children’s programming. Documentaries. Regional programming. Producing intellectually ambitious Canadian dramas and movies....So here’s a radical proposal to ensure that the CBC retains the spirit of a public broadcaster: Get rid of advertising. No ads on radio, no ads on TV, no ads on the website.
CBC  CBC_Radio  CBC_TV  NHL  hockey  editorials  public_goods  public_institutions  cultural_institutions  advertising 
december 2013
Google exec who made Android a global hit now building real robots - The Globe and Mail
JOHN MARKOFF Palo Alto, Calif.

The New York Times News Service

Published Wednesday, Dec. 04 2013,
robotics  Google 
december 2013
Have you been to Berlin’s most magnetic neighbourhood? - The Globe and Mail
ABIGAIL PUGH

BERLIN — Special to The Globe and Mail

Published Monday, Dec. 02 2013,
things_to_do  Berlin  Germany  travel 
december 2013
Why newness, not nostalgia, is the way forward for the CBC - The Globe and Mail
Dec. 03 2013 |The Globe and Mail | JOHN DOYLE.

Pardon me if I seem like a CBC bore, but the future cannot be found in nostalgia for a fondly remembered past or in endless collaboration with the enemy. The future is niche and broad, both the new and the familiar....It’s unwise to posit a recalibrated CBC on the antiquities of the past. Nostalgia for The Journal, Barbara Frum, and Patrick Watson’s series is understandable, but there is no going back to the good old days. The TV landscape has changed utterly. Nostalgia is not the way forward....Lacroix’s reliance on partnerships is a red herring. Of course it makes sense to use partnerships with other broadcasters to deliver big sporting events. But to cite “collaboration” with giant private-broadcasting conglomerates as a general panacea is a mistake. CBC-TV’s future is being both niche and broad – and distinctive; its mandate must not be diminished by “collaboration.”...[CBC's]news and documentary coverage must be different. That means more progressive voices heard, filling a huge gap in the Canadian media, an arena dominated by centre and right-wing views. The politically-progressive base in Canada remains stable and remains largely unheard. It’s the CBC’s job to fill that vacuum. Less of the Don Cherry-style dismissal of “pinkos out there that ride bicycles” and more attention to those who reject the right-wing, Big Business view of the country....CBC needs to put art on the air and cover the arts and media with a vigour that no commercial broadcaster will allow....Instead, a sharp questioning of establishment views and establishment stars. Something to make people talk about – whether it’s the demolition of received opinion or the creation of an artistic work for TV that makes your eyes pop and your mind reel.

It’s a fact that CBC is presented with a new circumstance, less reliant on, and preoccupied with, hockey.
CBC  CBC_Radio  CBC_TV  Konrad_Yakabuski  niches  nostalgia  partnerships  digital_media  future 
december 2013
Skipping breakfast,
Andrew Ryan

The Globe and Mail

Dec. 02 2013 | The Globe and Mail | Andrew Ryan.

FEAST AND FAMINE

Doctors could soon be advising patients with Type 2 diabetes to skip breakfast and plan their days around a big lunch.
diabetes  mens'_health  breakfasts  lunchtime 
december 2013
Bark with bite
January 30, 2012 | FT | By John Quelch.

Academics succeed if their names are linked to one important idea that outlives them. Professor Theodore Levitt’s name is linked to many. The first was a blockbuster. “Marketing myopia” was published by Harvard Business Review (HBR) in 1960, one year after Harvard Business School plucked Prof Levitt, the son of a German immigrant cobbler, from the University of North Dakota.

The article famously asked: “What business are you in?” It critiqued railroads for “letting their customers get away from them because they assumed themselves to be in the railroad business rather than the transportation business”. They were product-orientated rather than market-orientated....the importance of tangible evidence to reassure customers choosing among suppliers of intangible services (the impressive bank building, the authoritative logo)....I gave him a wide berth until it was time for feedback on my thesis proposal after three months of hard labour. The meeting lasted five minutes, barely long enough for Prof Levitt, whose mentoring style was more tough love than hand-holding, to dismiss me with: “Throw this out, start again and come back in a week with something important!” Fortunately, I did.

Prof Levitt’s advice was always to work on important problems that are important to important people in important companies. It spurred me to get out into the field, talk to business people, write case studies and understand the messy complexity of the world, rather than work behind my desk on mathematical models based on unrealistic assumptions.
advice  discernment  feedback  hand-holding  HBR  HBS  John_Quelch  marketing  market-orientated  messiness  myopic  primary_field_research  product-orientated  reminiscing  sophisticated  Theodore_Levitt  tough_love  worthiness  worthwhile_problems 
december 2013
Dundee’s real-time data innovations are as good as gold -
Dec. 01 2013 | The Globe and Mail | ERIC REGULY

Installing a data network in the mine puts Dundee at the forefront of the industry’s next phase – treating mines as if they were just-in-time manufacturing sites. That means every activity, from the number of scoops of ore delivered to the crushing machine to the number of metres drilled into the rock face, is recorded and displayed in real time.

In most mines, this data is now written on paper and collected at the end of the work shift, and the numbers are often inaccurate. “We want to turn an extremely low-tech industry into a high-tech industry,” Mr. Howes says. “If this industry wants to advance, it’s going to take a lot of software development.”

Any mishap or slowdown, from a truck that has made an unscheduled stop to a miner who is behind schedule, is immediately transmitted to the surface and action is taken. The surface crew even knows the whereabouts of its workers because an RFID – radio frequency identification device – is embedded in the battery that powers the helmet-mounted lamps.
real-time  Eric_Reguly  mining  massive_data_sets  Wi-Fi  RFID  data  Dundee 
december 2013
Rogers plays defence with its new investment in hockey - The Globe and Mail
BARRIE McKENNA

OTTAWA — The Globe and Mail

Published Sunday, Dec. 01 2013,
Barrie_McKenna  NHL  hockey  Rogers  CATV  television 
december 2013
How Big Data Is Changing Food Consumption
March 7, 2013 | | SmartData Collective

big data food consumptionby Ana Andreescu from GoodData
massive_data_sets  mobile_applications  policy  food  Waudware  OPMA  fresh_produce 
december 2013
Networking to grow your business
1. Build your ideal network
Identify who can provide introductions to the people you want to meet, whether it’s potential clients, investors or employees. Meeting people in professional settings, such as conferences or trade shows, or even getting to know the suppliers, clients or competitors of your target clients will help you build your ideal network. Don’t be afraid to ask for introductions.

2. Create a networking strategy
Develop an action plan to connect with each person on your list. Leverage existing networks, acquaintances and events. Social media tools, such es LinkedIn, Facebook and Twitter, are also powerful marketing tools that all; ggoeliont way to tap into broad social circles and establish a strong network.

3. Nurture and deepen your relationships
Prioritize the relationships that are most important for your business goals and manage your relationships to get the most benefit. Follow up and solidify your relationships by - 1 W * “J staying in touch on a regular basis over an extended period of time. A smaller network of high value contacts may serve you better than a larger network. Ensure that you are getting value by tracking your activities and the results they produce.

For more information, visit cibc.com/smallbusinessgrowth.
networking  howto  social_media  relationships  LinkedIn  conferences  action_plans  following_up 
december 2013
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