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Chilliwack artist celebrates flag's 50th - Chilliwack Times
by  Greg Laychak - Chilliwack Times
posted Feb 5, 2015 at 4:00 PM
art  artists  Canadian  inspiration  symbolism  flags 
february 2015
The best Pinboard app for iOS - The Sweet Setup
BY CHRIS GONZALES
After buying and testing far more Pinboard apps than any sane person should, I’ve concluded that Pinner is the best of the bunch. But believe me, it’s a close call these days.

Update December 30, 2014:
Pinboard  mobile_applications  productivity  iOS  iPhone 
february 2015
Want a strong digital brand? Then look at your offline one - The Globe and Mail
HILARY CARTER
Special to The Globe and Mail
Published Monday, Feb. 09 2015,
branding  social_media 
february 2015
iPhone 6 Plus' biggest weakness
FEB. 10, 2015 | - Business Insider | SAM COLT.
The iPhone 6 Plus is a fantastic phone with an unfortunate flaw: It's a data hog. iPhone 6 Plus users consume twice as much data as iPhone 6 users, according to a Citrix report. That's because people are using the 6 Plus like they would a tablet, watching tons of video and playing games.
iPhone  Achilles’_heel 
february 2015
Hollywood Talent Agency’s New Division to Manage Visual Artists’ Careers - WSJ
By KELLY CROW
Feb. 10, 2015
Should painters and sculptors be treated like movie stars? United Talent Agency thinks so.

The Beverly Hills, Calif., agency known for representing actors like Johnny Depp and Angelina Jolie said Tuesday it has launched a division called UTA Fine Arts to manage the careers of contemporary visual artists.

The move marks the first time a Hollywood talent agency has stepped into a role traditionally played by art galleries, and it underscores the growing commercial appeal that top artists wield in the global, multibillion-dollar art market.

Jim Berkus, chairman, said the agency won’t broker art sales or show the art as galleries do, but he said the art division will help contemporary artists amass financing for their creative projects and sign potentially lucrative corporate sponsorships and merchandising deals. Mr. Berkus said the firm will also assist artists who want to get more involved in the moviemaking business....The agency’s arrival is likely to rattle the art establishment, particularly the growing list of mega-dealers who have opened gallery branches around the world and are known for transforming artists into museum-ready superstars.

Marc Glimcher, who oversees the New York powerhouse Pace Gallery, said he thinks talent agents could drive a divisive wedge between artists and their dealers, who have historically guided artists toward commissions or relationships that may secure them a lasting place in art history.

“It sounds like an interesting idea, but it’s going to be super hard to pull off,” Mr. Glimcher said. “If you’re going to be an artist’s agent, you need to know more about their work, their prices and their collectors than their own dealer does—and no dealer will be induced to share that kind of information.”

Beyond market intelligence, Mr. Glimcher said talent agents will need to discern how many commercial deals an artist can shoulder without looking like a sellout to art-world insiders: “Do too much, and you’re just not cool anymore,” he added.
Hollywood  talent_management  career  contemporary_art  artists  product_launches  galleries  lawyers  entertainment_industry  market_intelligence  talent_representation  superstars  art_market 
february 2015
Check out these mobile shopping myths - The Globe and Mail
HARVEY SCHACHTER
Special to The Globe and Mail
Published Sunday, Feb. 08 2015
m-commerce  mobile  retailers  myths  McKinsey 
february 2015
Think tanks need to show us the money - The Globe and Mail
KONRAD YAKABUSKI
The Globe and Mail
Published Monday, Feb. 09 2015

Like Brookings, almost of all of Canada’s leading think tanks claim to be independent and non-partisan. But while none – not even the Broadbent Institute – is directly affiliated with a political party, it’s not hard to discern an identifiable political agenda in the research they produce. American think tanks, says former think-tank founder David Callahan, “often operate as the motherships of ideological movements – weaving together a jumble of values and ideas into a coherent story and actionable agenda.” You could easily say the same of most of their Canadian counterparts.
Konrad_Yakabuski  think_tanks  lobbying  Brookings  institution-building  networks  institutions  political_infrastructure  transparency  political_advocacy  policy_analysis  policy  conflicts_of_interest  policymaking 
february 2015
Andy Kessler: Potholes on the Uber Ride to Riches - WSJ
By ANDY KESSLER
Dec. 8, 2014

What should Uber do? Hiring expensive crisis managers is one option. Or do these four things that everyone else eventually figured out. Admit the mistake. Fire someone. Be transparent on the solution. Put guidelines in place to assure customers that this can’t happen again. Uber hasn’t done much of this but it should.... Those who run or work at startups are a different breed. Often computer science majors or engineers, they didn’t get invited to the cool parties. And then when they came up with ideas for products or companies, just about everyone, from parents to friends, told them they were crazy. That’ll never work, they said. Get a job at IBM like your uncle. But instead these entrepreneurs persist, usually failing a time or two. Mr. Kalanick started a peer-to-peer file-sharing company called Scour that went belly up in 2000.

Entrepreneurs pitch their ideas, sometimes to angel investors like dentists and accountants with extra cash, but more often to venture capitalists looking to fund the next big thing. As a venture capitalist, I’ve been pitched thousands of times, and entrepreneurs often peddle market-size projections and future sales predictions that are creative, if not fictional.

Those who win funding wake up every day and ask what they can do to make this thing work. Hubris becomes an asset. Startup CEOs are always saying the goal is to “suck the oxygen out of the room” of their competitors. Success requires a certain bravado. That should be encouraged, but most entrepreneurs have no idea when to turn it off.
hubris  Uber  sharing_economy  ride_sharing  Andy_Kessler  guardrails  start_ups  organizational_culture  entrepreneur  torchbearers  founders 
february 2015
It’s a Whole New Data Game for Business - WSJ
Feb. 9, 2015 | WSJ |

opportunistic data collection is leading to entirely new kinds of data that aren’t well suited to the existing statistical and data-mining methodologies. So point number one is that you need to think hard about the questions that you have and about the way that the data were collected and build new statistical tools to answer those questions. Don’t expect the existing software package that you have is going to give you the tools you need....Point number two is having to deal with distributed data....What do you do when the data that you want to analyze are actually in different places?

There’s lots of clever solutions for doing that. But at some point, the volume of data’s going to outstrip the ability to do that. You’re forced to think about how you might, for example, reduce those data sets, so that they’re easier to move.
data  data_collection  datasets  data_mining  massive_data_sets  distributed_data  haystacks  questions  tools  unstructured_data 
february 2015
Tory's aim to speed up SmartTrack plan approved by executive committee - The Globe and Mail
OLIVER MOORE AND ELIZABETH CHURCH - URBAN TRANSPORTATION REPORTER
TORONTO — The Globe and Mail
Published Friday, Dec. 05 2014
SmartTrack  John_Tory  mayoral  GO  TTC  transit  priorities 
february 2015
The Sex Question Readers Want Answered Most - WSJ
By ELIZABETH BERNSTEIN
Feb. 10, 2014

To rekindle the flame, skip the flowers and chocolate. Ditto the plan to get something going on your birthday or anniversary. "These are clichés,"..."We've been there and done that. The novelty has worn off."...Step One is to have a conversation with your spouse—and choose your words carefully...."The heart of all this sex stuff is emotional intimacy," she says. "If you actually want to make changes in your sex life, that's where you start."
Communicating_&_Connecting  Elizabeth_Bernstein  clichés  relationships  sex  sexuality  men  marriage  intimacy  questions 
february 2015
The raw and the clicked
; Retailing
The Economist409.8864 (Nov 30, 2013): n/a.
Turn on hit highlighting for speaking browsers by selecting the Enter button
Show highlighting
Abstract (summary) Translate [unavailable for ...
retailers  grocery  supermarkets  e-commerce  BCG  Tesco  Amazon  fresh_produce 
february 2015
John C. Whitehead - WSJ
Feb. 8, 2015| WSJ |

In 2005, Whitehead published a memoir A Life In Leadership: From D-Day to Ground Zero
obituaries  tributes  Wall_Street  books  The_Greatest_Generation  public_service  Goldman_Sachs  philanthropy  investment_banking  memoirs 
february 2015
Uberization of work may be coming to your chosen profession - The Globe and Mail
FARHAD MANJOO
The New York Times News Service
Published Wednesday, Jan. 28 2015
uber  sharing_economy  Farhad_Manjoo 
february 2015
Waterfront Toronto’s ‘innovation centre’ plans unveiled - The Globe and Mail
ELIZABETH CHURCH - CITY HALL BUREAU CHIEF
The Globe and Mail
Published Friday, Feb. 06 2015,
Toronto  waterfronts  innovation  real_estate  Waterfront_Toronto 
february 2015
Counterpoint: Harper has not shifted Canadians’ opinions - The Globe and Mail
Michael Adams
Counterpoint: Harper has not shifted Canadians’ opinions
SUBSCRIBERS ONLY
Special to The Globe and Mail
Published Friday, Feb. 06 2015
rebuttals  Stephen_Harper  Conservative_Party  conservatism  public_opinion 
february 2015
A ‘war on terrorism’? No thanks. There are smarter ways to meet the threat - The Globe and Mail
The Globe and Mail
Published Saturday, Feb. 07 2015

What do terrorists want? ....They want us to react to them, and above all to overreact....Using the language of war dignifies their delusions and elevates their crimes. Better to meet and defeat them on our country’s preferred turf: old-fashioned police work, patient intelligence gathering, meticulous legal proceedings and the fairest of trials. We know how to do this....Over the past few weeks, the Prime Minister has seemed intent on riling people up and making the most of the terrorist threat. He has exaggerated the danger of ISIS and its connection to possible terrorism in Canada. That’s wrong. At a time like this, the PM should be the chief minister in charge of deflating hyperbole, putting things in perspective – and reminding Canadians that we must continue as we always have, on guard but free.
terrorism  Stephen_Harper  overreaction  ISIS  Canada  Canadian  lone_wolves  editorials  sense_of_proportion  the_big_picture  home_grown  self-radicalization  strengths  security_&_intelligence  perspectives 
february 2015
Author Helen Humphreys on why she wrote her new book, the best advice she’s received and more - The Globe and Mail
The Globe and Mail
Published Friday, Feb. 06 2015,

What’s the best advice you’ve ever received?

Notice where you are and what it has to offer. Don’t force an agenda on people or places, but rather let yourself be open and receptive to what is already there. Also, to always do the important tasks of the day first thing in the morning, because a day will always get away from you. Both of these tips are good advice for life and writing equally.
writers  advice  GTD  tips  productivity  first90days  agendas 
february 2015
How the AGO’s Jean-Michel Basquiat retrospective confirms the late artist’s staying power - The Globe and Mail
JAMES ADAMS
The Globe and Mail
Published Friday, Feb. 06 2015

Jean-Michel Basquiat: Now’s the Time opens Saturday at the Art Gallery of Ontario for an exhibition concluding May 10. Toronto is the show’s sole North American stop. Details of opening hours, Basquiat-themed events and programs are at ago.net.
galleries  museums  African-Americans  AGO  art  artists 
february 2015
An iceman’s guide to sunny Tampa - The Globe and Mail
KARAN SMITH
Special to The Globe and Mail
Published Monday, Feb. 02 2015
Tampa  Florida  travel  things_to_do  restaurants 
february 2015
How Harper created a more conservative Canada - The Globe and Mail
John Ibbitson: How Harper created a more conservative Canada
SUBSCRIBERS ONLY
Ottawa — The Globe and Mail
Published Friday, Feb. 06 2015
John_Ibbitson  Stephen_Harper  Conservative_Party  conservatism  values 
february 2015
The Dangers and Opportunities in a Crisis
October 7, 2012 | NYTimes.com | By HUGO DIXON, Hugo Dixon is the founder and editor of Reuters Breakingviews.

Wherever one turns — politics, business, medicine, ecology, psychology, virtually every field of human activity — people talk about crises. But what are they, how do they develop and what can people do to change their course?

The first thing to say is that a crisis is not just a bad situation. When the word is used that way, it is devalued. The etymology is from the ancient Greek: krisis, or judgment. The Greek Orthodox Church uses the term when it talks about the Final Judgment — when sinners go to hell, but the virtuous end up in heaven. The Chinese have a similar concept: The characters for crisis combine parts of those for danger and opportunity.

A crisis is a point when people have to make rapid choices under extreme pressure, normally after something unhealthy has been exposed in a system. To use two other Greek words, one path can lead to chaos; another to catharsis or purification.

A crisis is certainly a test of character. It can be scary. Think of wars; environmental collapses that destroy civilizations of the sort charted in Jared Diamond’s book “Collapse: How Societies Choose to Fail or Succeed”; mass unemployment; or individual depression that leads to suicide.

But the outcome can also be beneficial. This applies whether one is managing the aftermath of the Lehman Brothers bankruptcy, the current euro crisis, the destruction of an oil rig in the Gulf of Mexico or an individual’s midlife crisis. Much depends on how the protagonists act.

Students of crises are fond of dividing them into phases. For example, Charles Kindleberger’s “Manias, Panics, and Crashes: A History of Financial Crises” identifies five phases of a financial crisis: an exogenous, normally positive, shock to the system; a bubble in which people exaggerate the benefits of that shock; distress when some investors realize that the game cannot last; the crash; and finally a depression.

Although there is much to commend in Mr. Kindleberger’s system, it is too rigid to account for all crises in all fields. It also downplays the possibility that decision makers can change the course of a crisis. A more flexible scheme that leaves space for human agency to affect how events turn out has just two phases: the bubble and the crash......The bubble is typically characterized by mania and denial. Things are going well — or, at least, appear to be. Feedback loops end up magnifying confidence...............Manic individuals do not know their limitations and end up taking excessive risks — whether on a personal level or in managing an organization or an entire economy. As the ancient Greeks said, hubris comes before nemesis........But before that, there is denial. People do not wish to recognize that there is a fundamental sickness in a system, especially when they are doing so well........The ethical imperative in this phase is to *burst the bubble before it gets too big*. That, in turn, means both being able to spot a bubble and having the courage to stop the party before it gets out of hand [JCK: courage = "political will"] . Neither is easy. It is hard to recognize a sickness, given that there is usually some ideology that explains away the mania as a new normal. The few naysayers can be ridiculed by those who benefit from the continuation of the status quo.

What is more, politicians, business leaders and investors rarely have long-term horizons. So even if they have an inkling that things are not sustainable, they may still have an incentive to prolong the bubble.......The crash, by contrast, is characterized by panic and scapegoating. People fear that the system could collapse. Negative feedback loops are in operation: The loss of confidence breeds further losses in confidence. This is apparent on an individual level as much as on a macro one.

..Events move extremely fast, and decisions have to be made rapidly........The key challenge is to make effective decisions that avoid vicious spirals while not embracing short-term fixes that fail to address the fundamental issues. With the euro crisis, for example, it is important to improve competitiveness with structural reforms and not just rely on liquidity injections from the European Central Bank.[JCK: "structural change"]

In this phase, no one denies that there is a problem. But there is often no agreement over what has gone wrong. Protagonists are reluctant to accept their share of the responsibility but instead seek to blame others. Such scapegoating, though, prevents people from reforming a system fundamentally so that similar crises do not recur.[JCK: "systemic change"].....Crises will always be a feature of life. The best that humanity can do is to make sure it does not repeat the same ones. And the main way to evolve — both during a bubble and after a crash — is to strive to be honest about what is sick in a system. That way, crises will not go to waste.
blaming_fingerpointing  books  bubbles  catharsis  chaos  character_tests  clarity  crisis  dangers  decision_making  denials  economic_downturn  feedback_loops  Hugo_Dixon  individual_agency  Jared_Diamond  manias  market_crash  new_normal  opportunities  overconfidence  political_will  risks  scapegoating  short-sightedness  societal_choices  speed  structural_change  systemic_change  systemic_risks 
february 2015
Hunting the gazelle
DECEMBER 7, 2007 | The Globe and Mail | by SEAN WISE.

If one is attempting to build relationships with fast growing companies, how does one decide which ones (of the thousands of small companies starting out) will become big companies - big enough to justify the cost of investing in them now?.......in an effort to ensure a shared nomenclature, here's a communal taxonomy to help classify the various types of ventures encountered.

• Mice are small companies that are likely to stay small. Think "Bob's Pizza"- they can serve a great slice of 'za but it is unlikely they will double in size annually.

• Elephants are large companies whose growth is constant, but at a low level. Think Royal Bank. Its revenues grow annually, but it is so large that the growth is negligible over the short term, yet noticeable over the long term. Unfortunately, these companies have a high client acquisition cost.

• Dogs are medium to large companies that are experiencing low or negative growth. Think "AOL". A great company, but its revenue is shrinking. In the venture capital business, I often refer to these companies as kennel capital, i.e., companies that should be put to sleep.

• Gazelles are young companies that are experiencing extreme, massive growth. For those that pitch them early, the CAC is low and carries with it a high return on investment. Think "Facebook".

From a cash flow perspective, all four business animals start at similar points, however, they diverge rather quickly. The green Mouse stays fairly consistent, growing and shrinking its cash flow over time - possibly as a result of seasonal conditions. Never is it losing money, but it's never really hitting it big, either. The yellow Elephant starts in the best cash flow position and grows consistently at a relatively reasonable CAGR (Compounded Annual Growth Rate - a common business term used to represent the annualized growth of the business). Backing an elephant is never a bad idea, it is in fact, the safest bet (no one ever got fired from trying to land an Elephant). Unfortunately, Elephants are hunted by all, and this in turn, drives up the customer acquisition cost (CAC).......The Gazelles are where it's at from a business development (aka hunting) perspective. Gazelles tend to have the highest CAGR. They're also non-bureaucratic, and are flat in their organizational chart, which contributes to shorter sales cycles and lower CAC.

How to pick a Gazelle?
(1) Focus on those in industries with CAGR > 25%. If an industry is growing annually by 25% or more, then even those companies who finish second or third in their niche will do well. After all, a rising tide floats all boats.

(2) Look for Scalability. If a company can scale, it means they can produce their products for ever-increasing margins (i.e., the 1000th widget costs less to make than the 10th).

(3) Focus on Sustainable Competitive Advantage. If the company you are reviewing lacks any sort of proprietary intellectual property (i.e., patents), or has no barrier to entry, how will they stop others from flooding the market and eating their lunch? Gazelles continue to grow faster than their competitors by being able to differentiate their offerings to their clients.

(4) Look for the 10x rule. Being a little better, a little faster; or a little cheaper isn't enough to turn a startup into a Gazelle. For that to happen, a company has to offer a solution that is 10x faster, 10x better, 10x more secure, 10x cheaper, etc. To sustain double digit growth over the long term, and/or to obtain dominant market position, you will need a 10x solution, a solution that is exponentially better.

The Bottom Line

Whether you are a startup, an angel investor looking to back the best startups, or a service provider looking to serve either, you need to be able to spot high growth companies earlier than others. You need to be able to separate the wheat from the chaff - the potential world leaders from those that will become kennel capital.

If you are looking to find the next Google, Facebook, or Workbrain, you need to strap on your pith helmet and start tracking the Gazelles. Doing so will most likely ensure the greatest returns on your efforts,
10x  barriers_to_entry  business_development  CAGR  cash_flows  competitive_advantage  culling  customer_acquisition  gazelles  high-growth  howto  return_on_effort  scaling  small_business  start_ups  taxonomy 
february 2015
What not to ask about at a job interview - The Globe and Mail
EILEEN DOOLEY
Special to The Globe and Mail
Published Tuesday, Feb. 03 2015
interviews  Managing_Your_Career  job_search 
february 2015
Why citrus is having a moment - The Globe and Mail
KARON LIU
Special to The Globe and Mail
Published Tuesday, Feb. 03 2015
citrus  fruits 
february 2015
Arrange Your Face
mask your emotions to preserve your political life as long as possible.
Hilary_Mantel  Thomas_Cromwell 
february 2015
Rackspace Says CEO Napier to Retire - WSJ - Linkis.com
By TESS STYNES and DREW FITZGERALD
Updated Feb. 10, 2014
Rackspace 
february 2015
Axel Springer CEO Döpfner Keeps Digital Dreams in Check - WSJ
By WILLIAM BOSTON
Updated Feb. 10, 2014

Mr. Döpfner said content once again will be king. "That's why it is interesting now to invest in content businesses that are still undervalued." He described last year's purchase of the Washington Post by Amazon.com Inc. CEO Jeff Bezos as a watershed event that drew the battle lines between the traditional publishing industry and technology companies such as Amazon, Google Inc. and Apple Inc.

"The question is whether traditional content companies will win the game because they have learned how to use technology or whether the technology companies win because they learn how to create content," Mr. Döpfner said. "That is the great game today." [the great game]
Forbes  mergers_&_acquisitions  Germany  German  publishing  digital_media  Axel_Springer  CEOs  content  undervalued  WaPo  Jeff_Bezos  digital_disruption  seminal_moments  big_bets  content_creators  the_great_game  turning_points 
february 2015
The end of BlackBerry as we know it - The Globe and Mail
RYAN CALIGIURI
Special to The Globe and Mail
Published Tuesday, Feb. 03 2015
Blackberry  innovation  Ryan_Caligiuri 
february 2015
Shelly Lazarus: A front seat witness to advertising's gender shift - The Globe and Mail
SUSAN KRASHINSKY - MARKETING REPORTER
The Globe and Mail
Published Thursday, Jan. 29 2015

You started at Ogilvy when David Ogilvy was still around. What was the best advice he ever gave you?

If you attract the right people and you create an environment where they’re as successful as they can possibly be, everything follows from that. ... He judged the output vigorously. He would have divine discontent, we would say. Nothing was ever good enough. If we said, okay, the work could be better, how do we get there? He would go back to either better people, or a better environment where they could do better work. Every answer came back to the quality of the people.
advice  advertising_agencies  Shelly_Lazarus  women  advertising  people_skills  resilience  bouncing_back  dissatisfaction  Managing_Your_Career  Ogilvy_&_Mather  Susan_Krashinsky  David_Ogilvy  Pablo_Picasso  professional_service_firms  the_right_people 
february 2015
The new-found fascination with bone broth - The Globe and Mail
JON SUFRIN
Special to The Globe and Mail
Published Tuesday, Feb. 03 2015
bones  broths  Japanese  soups  ramen 
february 2015
Lives Lived: Stewart Saxe, 67 - The Globe and Mail
DIANNE SAXE
Contributed to The Globe and Mail
Published Friday, Jan. 30 2015,
obituaries  lawyers 
february 2015
Want to kickstart the Canadian economy? Try "indovation", says U of T prof | U of T News
January 26, 2015 | U of T News | Terry Lavender.

Professor Dilip Soman heads up U of T's India Innovation Institute. He explains how necessity can be the mother of innovation. Indovation is a portmanteau of the words “Indian” and “innovation” and it means taking existing constraints – such as a shortage of funds or raw materials – into account when developing a response to actual problems.... “Frugality is at the essence of it,” Soman says. “In India, unless you can drive down costs, your idea is a non-starter.

“For example, mobile banking. That’s a classic ‘indovation’. It came about as a response to a particular problem, and it was developed in India and adopted in the west,” says Soman.

we’re working on developing a dataset on reverse innovation; the idea that innovations that have developed in the global south can be scaled back to the western world,” Soman says. “We have white papers on several topics: crowd-funding, agriculture, and retail and investment opportunities. The goal is to build up a database of information that both researchers as well as practitioners can use.”
constraints  innovation  India  Rotman  uToronto  trickle-up  frugality  necessity  reverse_innovation  jugaad  Bottom_of_the_Pyramid  datasets  Indians 
february 2015
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