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How the Civil Rights Movement has gained relevance for a new generation - The Globe and Mail
DAVID SHRIBMAN
How the Civil Rights Movement has gained relevance for a new generation
SUBSCRIBERS ONLY
Special to The Globe and Mail
Published Tuesday, Mar. 10 2015
civil_rights  millennials  African-Americans 
march 2015
What's Keeping Black Students From Studying Abroad?
MAR 13 2015| The Atlantic | BRANDON TENSLEY.

The grim reality of this 5-percent problem is that it also excludes blacks from gaining some important perspectives, according to Zim Ugochukwu, the 26-year-old creator of Travel Noire, a digital publishing platform that "creates tools and resources for the unconventional traveler."
Colleges_&_Universities  African-Americans  education  cosmopolitan  globalization  travel 
march 2015
Rouge Park stuck in political battle over environmental protections - The Globe and Mail
DAKSHANA BASCARAMURTY AND ANN HUI
The Globe and Mail
Published Friday, Mar. 13 2015
GTA  parks  Rouge_Park  ravines  politics  environment 
march 2015
Behind Martin Sorrell’s Data Binge - CMO Today - WSJ
Mar 12, 2015 | WSJ | By NATHALIE TADENA.

Sorrell, this is about putting his sprawling holding company in control of all the various data marketers are demanding nowadays to make sense of their ad campaigns. They want to know a lot about who is viewing. They want to know which TV shows or Web sites are ideal to reach their desired audience. And ultimately, they want to know how much an ad contributes to an actual sale of a product or service.

By becoming a global data powerhouse, WPP hopes to help clients draw connections across different data sources, better target audiences and ultimately improve the effectiveness of their advertising dollars.
data_sources  Martin_Sorrell  WPP  mergers_&_acquisitions  ROI  CMOs  M&A  data  metrics  measurements  advertising_agencies  advertising  marketing  data_driven  targeting  target_marketing 
march 2015
The Rise of the On-Demand Economy - The CIO Report - WSJ
March 13, 2015| WSJ | By IRVING WLADAWSKY-BERGER.

we are seeing the rise of what The Economist called the On-Demand Economy in a recent article....Manufacturing jobs have been automated out of existence or outsourced abroad, while big companies have abandoned lifetime employment. Some 53m American workers already work as freelancers....now the sharing economy is evolving into something new. Ubiquitous communications, freelance work forces and low transaction costs are giving rise to the on-demand company, which aims to apply the principles of Uber or Airbnb to a much broader range of markets....A well-managed company strives to achieve an optimal balance between what work gets done within and outside its boundaries.

Advances in information and communication technologies are having a huge impact on the structure of companies....Where is the future of work heading in such an economy? “Freelance workers available at a moment’s notice will reshape the nature of companies and the structure of careers,”...Ubiquitous communications and very low transaction costs are giving rise to a new class of firm, the on-demand company. These firms aim to efficiently bring together consumers and suppliers of goods and services with their highly scalable platforms and innovative applications...
digital_economy  sharing_economy  Uber  Lyft  Ronald_Coase  Coase's_Law  transaction_costs  freelancing  on-demand  Outsourcing  gig_economy  Irving_Wladawsky-Berger 
march 2015
The best tax software - and its pitfalls - The Globe and Mail
PAUL BRENT
Special to The Globe and Mail
Published Monday, Apr. 02 2012

UFile software, Intuit’s TurboTax, StudioTax.
taxes  tax_planning  CRA 
march 2015
We can’t afford a postinstitutional society - The Globe and Mail
Mar. 11 2015 | The Globe and Mail |STEPHEN TOOPE.

Institutions matter. One of the markers of advanced industrial societies is their rich network of institutions that support good governance, ensure security, provide needed social services and foster educated work forces. There is a continuing debate in the developing world about whether strong institutions are needed for economic growth or whether they result from the achievement of a certain income level. What is not in dispute is that successful societies thrive with strong institutions and decay without them.

Crowdsourcing may enable a startup tech company to survive another day; it may help a sick child gain access to specialized medical care. It will never replace a stock exchange or build a health system that’s available to all.

Google may soon produce a car that can drive itself. But that car can function only if there are socially mandated rules of the road that allow programmers to know on what side of the street the car should run, and what to do at a red light.
institutions  rules_of_the_game  good_governance  developed_countries  institutional_integrity  chicken-and-egg  developing_countries 
march 2015
This Is How We Do It: Ben Horowitz on How Software Testing Has Changed - The CIO Report - WSJ
March 12, 2015 | WSJ |By STEVE ROSENBUSH.

Two trends led to the creation of SignalFx...“It used to be that every server was sacred and if one went down, it was a catastrophe,” Mr. Horowitz said. In the era of the cloud and so-called webscale companies, that no longer should be the case, he contends. “Facebook has over one million servers. If one goes down, it doesn’t matter. What matters is how the app that is being served is performing. Is there a bottleneck or is it doing okay?”...The other big trend behind the creation of SignalFx lay in software development process. In an era of continuous deployment and updates, there’s no time to have IT identify a problem and kick it back to the engineers....“What you really need is software developers looking at how applications are doing. But you have to give developers tools to instrument their own code,” he said.

Such monitoring tools will vary from case to case. “Memory usage, response time .. any number of things may characterize an application tier, or Web tier. You have to be able to express things like that.... “In the old days, from the engineering standpoint, functionality was a huge thing. Now it is a small thing when it comes to testing. Scale and reliability are the big things, and testing has to be in real time.”
Ben_Horowitz  Andreessen_Horowitz  software_development  tools  CIOs  monitoring  SignalFx  scaling  reliability  real-time  testing  control_systems  dashboards  instrumentation_monitoring 
march 2015
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RBdigital  Zinio  TPL  magazines  digital_media  reading 
march 2015
On the Case at Mount Sinai, It’s Dr. Data - NYTimes.com
MARCH 7, 2015 | NYT |By STEVE LOHR.

“Data-ism: The Revolution Transforming Decision Making, Consumer Behavior, and Almost Everything Else,” by Steve Lohr,
Steve_Lohr  data  data_driven  data_scientists  Wall_Street  Facebook  hospitals  medical  books  Cloudera  consumer_behavior 
march 2015
How to De-Clutter Your Magazine Pile - WSJ
By SUE SHELLENBARGER
Updated March 10, 2015.

Consciously filter your reading load, limiting your Facebook visits for industry news to once a week. When I travels, practice ignoring the Wi-Fi on planes and immerses myself in reading. I can also consumes more news and books in audio form, listening in subways or cabs or while walking....Other timesavers include reading synopses of books, rather than the whole thing. Executive book summaries can be found at Summary.com. Another site, NextIssue.com, offers access to 140 magazines via a single subscription.
filtering  howto  reading  GTD  productivity  Sue_Shellenbarger  mobile_applications  information_overload  decluttering  Evernote  scanning  digital_life  digitalization 
march 2015
Jay Carney regrets ‘looking like a jerk’ at some White House press briefings - NY Daily News
BY LESLIE LARSON NEW YORK DAILY NEWS Friday, June 20, 2014

“When somebody’s gettin’ riled up and filled with sometimes feigned righteous indignation, if they’re really obnoxious and you get a little rattled then you sort of engage.
Jay_Carney  White_House  media_relations  public_relations  regrets 
march 2015
Hidden language of the streets - FT.com
March 6, 2015 | FT| Edwin Heathcote.

Each city has its own visual and filmic shorthand for its streetscape (should read "cityscape"). There are the monuments — the Eiffel Tower, Big Ben, the Empire State Building and so on, but at street level there are markers of urban identity as potent as the great monuments and which, in fact, have a far more meaningful impact on everyday life, as the fragments that form the backdrop against which we live our public lives.
...Street furniture and the in-between architecture that populates the pavements defines the experience of walking through the city. ...Streets and their furniture are designed for an ideal public but they can also be vehicles of control....The question is, what kind of meaning does our contemporary streetscape communicate? Throughout the history of public space, urban markers have been used to convey a sense of place, of centre, connection and of context. ....Then there is a rich layer of what we might call in-between architecture, the market stalls, newsstands, food carts and hot-dog stands, caramelised-nut vendors and seafood stalls. To a large extent these are among the elements that make up the experience of the city yet they are rarely regarded as architecture. Instead they represent an ad-hoc series of developments that have evolved to an optimum efficiency....This layer expresses the story of the desires, the fears, the entrepreneurialism and the attitude to privacy of a city. But the most intriguing thing is that it is simultaneously an expression of the top-down and the bottom-up city.
cities  design  identity  architecture  public_spaces  furniture  cityscapes  iconic  top-down  bottom-up  street_furniture  streetscapes  overlay_networks  streets  landmarks  shorthand 
march 2015
Eight steps to better health after 40 - The Globe and Mail
ALEX ALLAN - HEALTH ADVISOR
Special to The Globe and Mail
Published Sunday, Mar. 08 2015
aging  exercise  midlife  sleep  strength_training  fitness  stretching  gratitude 
march 2015
Economists’ magic
John Kenneth Galbraith’s admonition: “The purpose of studying economics is not to acquire a set of ready-made answers to economic questions, but to learn how to avoid being deceived by economists....
economists  economics  John_Kenneth_Galbraith  forecasting  quotes 
march 2015
Governments need to deliver big infrastructure projects honestly - The Globe and Mail
MARCUS GEE
The Globe and Mail
Published Monday, Mar. 09 2015

Why do big projects like these so often go over time and over budget? Ryerson University professor Murtaza Haider says that delays and overruns on megaprojects are common all over the world. Proponents of big projects consistently low-ball the cost for fear that the sticker shock might prevent them from ever getting built. “It is a very serious issue that goes to the heart of the credibility of all those who are building the infrastructure,” he says.

The hitches with the Spadina line are especially serious for a city such as Toronto that must spend billions to renew and build out its infrastructure. “If this is the norm, we have a problem,” says Prof. Haider.

Yes, we do. The dynamic at work here is universal and troubling. A government that announces a big, expensive project is loath to admit that things have gone wrong and that it is spending more public money than it said it would.

Instead, it grabs any opportunity to boast about how great the project is and how well it is going. Rather than being a monitor, it turns into a cheerleader.
Marcus_Gee  transit  infrastructure  cost_overruns  Toronto  truth-telling  honesty  megaprojects  normalization 
march 2015
Kleiner Perkins, Disrupted - NYTimes.com
By DAVID STREITFELD MARCH 9, 2015.

The last decade has not been as kind to Kleiner. Entrepreneurs have less need of venture capitalists and their cash, because it is cheaper to start a company and they now have other funding sources. Kleiner also had self-inflicted wounds: An ambitious bet on alternative energy companies, also known as green tech, did not work out as well as hoped, and many opportunities were missed in consumer Internet companies. When the events at issue in the trial took place — roughly 2008 to 2012 — the firm downsized.

A struggling firm in a struggling industry is, as all connoisseurs of digital disruption know, bound to be filled with unhappiness....Kleiner was a firm in flux, Mr. Hirschfeld recalled. One woman he talked to said Kleiner “seemed to be moving from a brand called KP to a brand of individuals that are part of KP. It was now becoming more of a cult of personality, and each personality had its own brand.” ...Kleiner is coming off at the trial as a place where, whatever its undoubted excellence, the loudest people win, the most aggressive win, and those who can find a mentor by sucking up win. This does not sound like a family, a meritocracy or even a place that is a successful investor over the long term.

Why didn’t Kleiner realize this in 2012, when Mr. Hirschfeld submitted his 26-page report?

Perhaps the firm was focused on the narrow issue: whether Ms. Pao was the subject of discrimination. Mr. Hirschfeld’s answer was no, and so maybe the details did not matter.
venture_capital  Kleiner_Perkins  disruption  gender_discrimination  women  personality_cults  self-inflicted  Silicon_Valley  Ellen_Pao  John_Doerr  personal_branding  lawsuits  unhappiness  digital_disruption 
march 2015
With Misattributed Constable Masterpiece, a Rare Look Into the Imprecise World of Art Identification - NYTimes.com
By LORNE MANLY MARCH 7, 2015

At a time when the attribution of paintings can be so litigious that many experts have retreated from the field, the startling reassessment of the “Cathedral,“ and its sudden explosion in value, provides a rare window into the often imprecise, and debate-riddled, field of identifying the authorship of artworks.

The Metropolitan Museum of Art has twice changed its mind in the past four decades over whether its portrait of Philip the IV is a masterpiece by Velázquez (the current view), or a fine painting by an also-ran. Sotheby’s was sued after it sold what it had determined to be a copy of Caravaggio’s “The Cardsharps” for £42,000 (about $83,000) in 2006, only to have a scholar later declare it was actually by the master himself.

This time it is Christie’s that is facing questioning over whether it bungled the attribution of a painting. “We understand that there is no clear consensus of expertise on the new attribution,” the company said in a statement.
art  artwork  art_history  art_appraisals  art_authentication  auctions  imprecision  painters  paintings  provenance  Sotheby's 
march 2015
‘Who Owns the Future?’ by Jaron Lanier - NYTimes.com
MAY 5, 2013
Continue reading the main story
Books of The Times
By JANET MASLIN
books  massive_data_sets  book_reviews  futurists  future 
march 2015
Capital Journal: Republicans Grapple With the Rand Paul Conundrum - WSJ
By GERALD F. SEIB
Updated June 2, 2014

Rand Paul is, of course, the junior senator from Kentucky and a rising star in his party. He mixes tea-party appeal with the libertarian instincts he inherited from his father, former Rep. Ron Paul .

He attracts some constituencies other Republicans have a hard time reaching—college-age voters, in particular—and is diligently trying to reach out to minority groups that have slipped further from the grasp of others in his party. Indeed, the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People, an organization not known for its close relations with Republicans, invited him to appear at its July annual meeting, Mr. Paul's office says, though a scheduling conflict likely will prevent him from appearing....Mr. Paul doesn't consider himself an isolationist, of course. In fact, in an op-ed written earlier this year for the Washington Post, he essentially described the debate between isolationism and interventionism as a phony one: "False choices between being everywhere all of the time and nowhere any of the time are fodder for debate on Sunday morning shows or newspaper columns. Real foreign policy is made in the middle...."
Gerald_Seib  Rand_Paul  GOP  U.S.foreign_policy  millennials  NAACP  isolationism  false_choices  constituencies  conundrums 
march 2015
John Steele Gordon: The Little Miracle Spurring Inequality - WSJ
By JOHN STEELE GORDON
Updated June 2, 2014

Extreme leaps in innovation, like the invention of the microprocessor, bring with them staggering fortunes....The great growth of fortunes in recent decades is not a sinister development. Instead it is simply the inevitable result of an extraordinary technological innovation, the microprocessor, which Intel brought to market in 1971. Seven of the 10 largest fortunes in America today were built on this technology, as have been countless smaller ones. These new fortunes unavoidably result in wealth being more concentrated at the top.

But no one is poorer because Bill Gates , Larry Ellison , et al., are so much richer. These new fortunes came into existence only because the public wanted the products and services—and lower prices—that the microprocessor made possible. Anyone who has found his way home thanks to a GPS device or has contacted a child thanks to a cellphone appreciates the awesome power of the microprocessor. All of our lives have been enhanced and enriched by the technology.....technology opens up many new economic niches, and entrepreneurs rush to take advantage of the new opportunities....The Dutch exploited the new trade (with India and the East Indies) so successfully that the historian Simon Schama entitled his 1987 book on this period of Dutch history "The Embarrassment of Riches."...attempt to tax away new fortunes in the name of preventing inequality is certain to have adverse effects on further technology creation and niche exploitation by entrepreneurs—and harm job creation as a result. The reason is one of the laws of economics: Potential reward must equal the risk or the risk won't be taken.
Silicon_Valley  wealth_creation  innovation  income_distribution  income_inequality  productivity_payoffs  plutocracies  software  Thomas_Piketty  microprocessors  historians  history  entrepreneurship  books  Industrial_Revolution  Gilded_Age  Simon_Schama  Dutch  discontinuities  disequilibriums  adverse_selection 
march 2015
Canadian economy suffers from the myth of comparative advantage - The Globe and Mail
ANDREW JACKSON
Canadian economy suffers from the myth of comparative advantage
SUBSCRIBERS ONLY
Special to The Globe and Mail
Published Thursday, Mar. 05 2015

Consider the recent bid by China to assist in the design, build and operation of high-speed trains in Ontario, perhaps in return for preferred access to raw resources. China is seeking to displace Bombardier, one of our foremost innovative companies, in our own domestic market.

Just as instructively, Bombardier is entering into joint aerospace production deals with Chinese companies, in large part because that is the key to access to the Chinese market. China wants to import our raw resources, not out trains or our planes, and wants to build up a competitive aerospace industry.

The key point here is that China has a competitive advantage based upon still relatively low wages (though they have risen a lot) and is also creating a competitive advantage in sophisticated industries through active industrial and managed trade policies. While we talk about comparative advantage, they are shaping trade and production in their own developmental interests.
industrial_policies  China  Bombardier  high-speed_rail  competitive_advantage  competitiveness_of_nations  comparative_advantage  myths  international_trade  economics  HSR 
march 2015
Buying a Better World questions the legacy of financier George Soros, but doesn’t give us a full answer - The Globe and Mail
PAUL WALDIE
The Globe and Mail
Published Friday, Feb. 27 2015,

Title Buying a Better World: George Soros and Billionaire Philanthropy
Author Anna Porter
Genre business
Publisher TAP Books
Pages 224 pages
Price $19.99
Year 2015
George_Soros  moguls  books  Paul_Waldie  financiers  legacies 
march 2015
Leonard Nimoy will forever be known as Star Trek’s Mr. Spock - The Globe and Mail
LYNN ELBER
LOS ANGELES — The Associated Press
Published Friday, Feb. 27 201
obituaries  Star_Trek  actors 
march 2015
Intellectual maestro craves connections as NACO’s music director - The Globe and Mail
ROBERT EVERETT-GREEN
The Globe and Mail
Published Friday, Feb. 27 2015,

The energetic Englishman’s conversation, during a short visit to Toronto, is full of the language of linkage and cross-reference. Just about everything good can be made better, in his view, if the connections between things, people and ideas are stronger... if classical music isn’t reaching parts of the population, he says, it’s because those who perform aren’t doing enough to make links between the music, its history and the way we live today. “I only really connect to a piece of music when I read around it, I mean the broad social context.”

Connecting dots is a familiar theme in the arts and in arts promotion these days, but Shelley is quite willing to chase it into the corners, as they say in hockey. ....tell a compelling story which helps to solve a problem (Daniel Doctoroff--Bloomberg's guy)
music  Communicating_&_Connecting  Ottawa  cultural_institutions  connecting_the_dots  artists  orchestras_&_symphonies  classical_music  CEOs  sense-making  contextual  cross-pollination  interconnections 
march 2015
Riders on the economic storm: Practical thinking for small business Riders on the economic storm: Practical thinking for small business | None | Nu U Consulting
24/06/09

Jonathan Weber writes in Slate’s The Big Money: Making Payroll feature in a piece titled, “Know When to Fold”: “Failure is not something an entrepreneur can give in to very readily. A certain level of blind optimism—even in the face of long odds—is often necessary to build a successful product or company. If you, as the business owner, don't believe, you can be pretty sure your employees, customers, and shareholders won't, either… don't give in easily if you feel the passion… Sometimes you have to take the view that failure simply isn't an option.”
tips  economic_downturn  small_business  strategies  networking  value_propositions 
march 2015
Hillary Clinton + Lady Macbeth = Molly Parker on House of Cards - The Globe and Mail
JOHANNA SCHNELLER
Special to The Globe and Mail
Published Friday, Feb. 14 2014
actors  hotties  women  Canadian  House_of_Cards 
march 2015
Street savvy: A look at how Toronto’s traffic nerve centre really manages our roads - The Globe and Mail
OLIVER MOORE
The Globe and Mail
Published Friday, Feb. 27 2015,

As drivers wrestle with congestion on roads across Toronto, staff at the city’s Traffic Management Centre swing into action when anything goes wrong. Far from the public gaze, they dispatch response teams, warn drivers and, in some cases, fiddle with traffic signals to manage the flow better.

This real-time effort to monitor and relieve Toronto’s increasingly clogged streets is run by a small team in a nondescript Don Mills office building.
traffic_congestion  Toronto  surveillance  real-time  digital_savvy 
march 2015
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