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Definitive ways brands can harness the Internet of Things - iMediaConnection.com
Jessica Groopman
Contact
Follow this authorRSSTwitter Media Planning & Buying Posted on March 10, 2015
Industrial_Internet  Altimeter  brands  LBMA  location_based_services 
february 2016
JetBlue Airways Forms Technology Unit - WSJ
By SUSAN CAREY
Updated Feb. 11, 2016

JetBlue Airways Corp. is launching a subsidiary, JetBlue Technology Ventures, in Silicon Valley to find and help develop new technology ventures in the travel and hospitality sectors.... the initiative is focused on using technology in three areas: making passenger and employee experiences smoother, better using the massive amounts of data airlines acquire, and improving airline operations and logistics. She said potential technologies include geolocation, virtual reality, big data, connectivity and artificial intelligence....Robin Hayes, JetBlue’s chief executive, and Eash Sundaram, chief information officer, have been talking for a year about forming a subsidiary to look at innovation, while the airline’s board “has been thinking about how to expand the JetBlue brand.”
JetBlue  Silicon_Valley  airline_industry  travel  hospitality  massive_data_sets  innovation  corporate_investors  customer_experience  geolocation  virtual_reality  artificial_intelligence 
february 2016
The brokerage bust: Why Bay Street will never be the same - The Globe and Mail
NIALL MCGEE
TORONTO The Globe and Mail Last updated: Saturday, Feb. 06, 2016
boutiques  Bay_Street  failure 
february 2016
National Research Council takes warlike stand to spur innovation - The Globe and Mail
BARRIE McKENNA
National Research Council takes warlike stand to spur innovation
SUBSCRIBERS ONLY
OTTAWA — The Globe and Mail
Published Friday, Feb. 05, 2016
innovation  NRC 
february 2016
Tips from Jack Welch, Shaquille O'Neal for powering performance - The Globe and Mail
HARVEY SCHACHTER
Special to The Globe and Mail
Published Thursday, Feb. 04, 2016
Harvey_Schachter  Jack_Welch 
february 2016
Courses in Manhood for African-American Boys - The New York Times
FEB. 4, 2016 | NYT | By PATRICIA LEIGH BROWN.

While lower grades focus on the stories, legacies and images of black people, high school students take a deep dive into African-American history and culture, from ancient civilizations to the civil rights movement to contemporary media. All classes are taught by black male instructors whose own experiences and perspectives provide a multidimensional understanding of the students they mentor (in Oakland, as elsewhere, more than half the teachers are white and most are women).
African-Americans  coming-of-age  cultural_identity  high_schools  history  life_skills  male  masculinity  mentoring  Oakland  rituals  students  values 
february 2016
Marketing in the Moments, to Reach Customers Online - The New York Times
JAN. 17, 2016 | NYT | By ROBERT D. HOF .

MOMENTS are having a moment in advertising. Or at least a micro moment.....It is not just a matter of reaching people at a particular time of day, a capability advertisers have employed for decades. Randy Wootton, chief executive of the ad technology firm Rocket Fuel, which recently announced a “marketing in the moment” approach, refers to ancient Greek concepts of time: chronos, or sequential time, and kairos, a moment of opportunity independent of linear time. The latter, of course, is the one his company claims to employ for marketers.

Another key, said Brian Solis, a principal analyst at Altimeter Group, a market research firm, is that the ads need to be more useful than they are attention-getting. According to a Google survey, 51 percent of smartphone owners have bought from a different company than they intended on the basis of information found online.....However, to build brands, an effort that accounts for the majority of ad spending, companies need more than a moment. And few marketers currently have all the skills needed for moments-based marketing, such as ethnographic studies of their customers and the ability to match customer data to the right context,
intentionality  immediacy  GPS  location_based_services  Greek  LBMA  advertising  instant_gratification  purchase_decisions  brands  branding  marketing  ephemerality  impulse_purchasing  contextual  Ram_Charan  P&G  real-time  Flybits  moments  linearity  seminal_moments  chronological  kairos 
february 2016
Maurice White, Founder of Earth, Wind & Fire, Dies at 74 - The New York Times
By PETER KEEPNEWS FEB. 4, 2016

Earth, Wind & Fire — whose many hits included “Shining Star,” “September,” “That’s the Way of the World” and a cover of the Beatles’ “Got to Get You Into My Life” — had a sound that was rooted in rhythm and blues but crossed musical boundaries, attracting an audience that was as diverse racially as the music was stylistically.

The horn arrangements were punchy, the bass lines funky and the rhythms infectious, but there was also room for adventurous improvisation, mellow vocal harmonies and pure pop melodicism.

“Although we were basically jazz musicians, we played soul, funk, gospel, blues, jazz, rock and dance music … which somehow ended up becoming pop,”....Earth, Wind & Fire, which was larger than the average rock or funk band, became renowned not just for its music but also for its elaborate stage shows, marked by pyrotechnics, choreography, lighting effects and sometimes even magic tricks.
obituaries  singers  songwriters  African-Americans  '70s  music  funk  Earth_Wind_&_Fire 
february 2016
What O.J. Simpson Taught Me About Being Black - The New York Times
By JOHN McWHORTER FEB. 3, 2016

The [O.J. Simpson} case was about much more than bloody gloves and bloody footprints. It was about the centrality of police brutality to black Americans’ very sense of self....After a while I realized that the rub was that my life had spared me from experiencing or even seeing police abuse. ...what prevents real racial conciliation and understanding in America is the poisonous relations between blacks and the police.....Many non-black Americans who were disgusted by the Simpson verdict have become more aware of the ubiquity of police brutality in black lives.
African-Americans  John_McWhorter  O.J._Simpson  police_misconduct  '90s  identity  celebrities  symbolism  race  criminal_justice_system  police_brutality 
february 2016
Jeffrey Simpson: What Iowa can and can’t tell us - The Globe and Mail
JEFFREY SIMPSON
Why Rubio will likely win the nomination. But for the wrong reasons
SUBSCRIBERS ONLY
The Globe and Mail
Published Wednesday, Feb. 03, 2016
Marco_Rubio  Campaign_2016  GOP  nominations  politics  Jeffrey_Simpson  candidates 
february 2016
Too much stuff, with no one to buy it: Is this the future economy? - The Globe and Mail
Scott Barlow
Too much stuff, with no one to buy it: Is this the future economy?
SUBSCRIBERS ONLY
The Globe and Mail
Published Tuesday, Feb. 02, 2016

University of California professor Brad DeLong’s “Economics and the Age of Abundance” highlighted the new economic study of global production growth – a new-ish school of thought that attributes much of the economic malaise in the developed world to a technology-driven “too much of everything.....The economic challenges of abundance, however, go far beyond commodities. There’s too many mutual funds, television channels, cereal brands, auto companies (China hasn’t even started exporting cars and trucks yet), land-line telephones, clothing brands, taxis, department stores and, if we’re being honest, journalism. Technology and its ability to increase productivity are to blame for virtually any major market sector beset with poor profit margins and layoffs. ....... The larger problem, and I suspect Mr. DeLong would agree, is that technology increases efficiencies and reduces the need for labour. A dystopian future in which anything can be produced quickly and cheaply, except everyone’s unemployed with no money to spend, is easy to envisage without considerable structural change in the economy.

Unemployment is the most severe outgrowth of abundance and low profitability ....... ......
abundance  economics  economists  Colleges_&_Universities  oversupply  technology  commodities  over_investment  scarcity  innovation  China  productivity  deflation  manufacturers  outsourcing  unemployment  job_destruction  job_displacement  downward_mobility  hollowing_out  books  developed_countries  dystopian_futures  structural_change  developing_countries 
february 2016
Bacteria to the rescue: Indiscriminately killing germs eliminates the ones that are helping us - The Globe and Mail
WENCY LEUNG
The Globe and Mail
Published Sunday, Jan. 31, 2016

Toronto microbiologist Jason Tetro in his new book, The Germ Files: The Surprising Ways Microbes Can Improve Your Health and Life (And How to Protect Yourself from the Bad Ones).

As Tetro explains, antibiotics and antimicrobial products kill germs indiscriminately, destroying the ones that keep us healthy along with those that cause harm. Rather than wipe out entire populations of bacteria, yeasts and fungi, scientists are now searching for ways to bring them into better balance, allowing them to live among us, and within us, harmoniously.
germs  bacteria  mens'_health  digestive_systems  colons  books  TPL  antimicrobial_resistance  immune_system  antibiotics  self-protection 
february 2016
Black America and the Class Divide - The New York Times
By HENRY LOUIS GATES Jr.FEB. 1, 2016

there are really two nations within Black America. The problem of income inequality, Dr. Wilson concludes, is not between Black America and White America but between black haves and have-nots, something we don’t often discuss in public in an era dominated by a narrative of fear and failure and the claim that racism impacts 42 million people in all the same ways.
Henry_Louis_Gates  African-Americans  Colleges_&_Universities  WEB_Dubois  crisis  disintegration  social_classes  leadership  income_inequality  underclass 
february 2016
Trying to Separate Bill Cosby From Cliff Huxtable - The New York Times
By RACHEL L. SWARNS JAN. 31, 2016

When an artist is disgraced, what happens to his art? What in the world will become of Dr. Huxtable?
========
Many people are deeply flawed and everyone has to wrestle with their relationship to them. What they create is one thing, who they are is another - for me the two can co-exist, as they must.....Great people are flawed, and evil people have unexpected qualities. It is only in our desire to fit everyone into a nice one-dimensional box that we struggle. ...Very few half hour TV sitcoms show complex characters. When the weekly showing of a beloved one dimensional character must co-exist with with the real life actor whose private behaviour crosses so many lines of good manners, morality or criminality, viewers rarely are able to look at the "art" without seeing the "artist". Reconciling any perfect image with "tarnished" reality is difficult whether examining the work and lives of sports heroes, elected officials, rock stars, bishops or authors.
========
role_models  compartmentalization  actors  Bill_Cosby  grieving  African-Americans  scandals  trailblazers  sexual_misconduct 
february 2016
Five U.S. sectors expected to outperform in 2016 - The Globe and Mail
PAUL BRENT
Special to The Globe and Mail
Published Thursday, Jan. 07, 201
forecasting  trends  outperformance 
february 2016
February 2016 Report on Business
Invest like a legend: ROB Mag's annual dose of investing wisdom
Ex-CEO of Lululemon makes her new pitch: high-end frozen food
Slow plane to China: B.C.’s Harbour Air eyes massive market
Goldcorp’s CEO reflects on seven years at the helm
How Group of Gold Line serves its target customer: new Canadians
Coal comfort: Murray Energy Corp.’s CEO fights back
investing  magazines  Second_Acts 
january 2016
The Language Barrier Is About to Fall - WSJ
By ALEC ROSS
Jan. 29, 2016

Universal machine translation should accelerate the world’s growing interconnectedness. While the current stage of globalization was propelled in no small part by the adoption of English as the lingua franca for business—to the point that there are now twice as many nonnative English speakers as native speakers—the next wave will open up communication even more broadly by removing the need for a shared language. Currently, when Korean-speaking businesspeople speak with Mandarin-speaking executives at a conference in Brazil, they converse in English. There will no longer be this need, opening the door of global business for nonelites and a massive number of non-English speakers.
languages  globalization  machine_learning  translations 
january 2016
Coming of Age, Whether They Like It or Not - The New York Times
By MEGAN RUBINER ZINN JANUARY 31, 2016

The various cultures that created coming-of-age rituals knew what they were doing, and it’s not surprising that the rituals have maintained a place in the modern world. At this cusp of the teen years, when kids are excited and afraid to be adults, when they try out new personalities by the day, when their sense of self may be dictated by their peers and the media, they have an accomplishment that is all theirs. It need not be a religious or cultural ritual, just a challenging, adult responsibility. In the case of a bar or bat mitzvah, kids take on something that is extraordinarily hard, something that requires persistence and focus for months, if not years, something that they may not want to do. And they do it, in front of their family and friends, and they do it very well. From there, no matter what challenges these kids meet: a difficult class, paper, exam, a scary responsibility, decision or action, they can look back on this day and remind themselves of what they accomplished when they were only 13.
Judaism  Jewish  rituals  aging  children  coming-of-age  persistence  arduous  focus  stressful  perseverance  endurance 
january 2016
Leadership Means Learning to Look Behind the Mask - The New York Times
JAN. 30, 2016 | NYT | By BARBARA MISTICK.

Don't wait until it's too late to solicit feedback. Ms. Mistick was named president and director of Andrew Carnegie’s public library system in Pittsburgh, becoming only the second nonlibrarian to lead the system in over 110 years. She went in knowing that she was considered an outsider and that she would need to call on all her interpersonal and communication skills to navigate her new position. The problem is, the higher your position in an organization, the harder it is to receive honest assessments from the people who work for you, because the balance of authority shifts. ...The search for genuine feedback is increasingly your own responsibility.... In a culture of scarce resources, people had become guarded with their opinions. ....Mistick felt that everyone except her knew what was expected to succeed in “library land.” New jobs always present the challenge of how to read the norms, standards and expectations that aren’t explicitly told to new hires....When seeking input on specific skills, the 360-degree management assessment tool is a great starting place. When you want insights on the most important priorities for personal change, it takes honest conversation with those who know you best at work....We each have more control of our future than we recognize. One of the most powerful ways we can take charge of developing new skills is to ask for feedback.
leadership  women  CEOs  Communicating_&_Connecting  sense-making  performance_reviews  people_skills  Pittsburgh  libraries  anonymity  feedback  first90days  self-improvement  outsiders  tacit_knowledge  insights 
january 2016
Chocosol Chocolate: From Beans to Bar – ChocoSol Traders
1131 St. Clair Avenue West
Toronto, ON
M6E 1B1
416-923-6675
chocolate  green  Toronto 
january 2016
Retailing Through The Trough Of Disillusionment -
January 22, 2016Posted in Blog, Marketing, Mobile Marketing, Strategy, Technology, The Future

By Doug Stephens
Doug_Stephens  retailers  strategy  location_based_services  LBMA  tech-utopianism  disillusioned  Gartner 
january 2016
The Power of Daily Writing in a Journal - WSJ
By CLARE ANSBERRY
Jan. 26, 2016

Making journal entries is a form of reflection... reflection creates personal insight... and insight makes people more productive.
journaling  habits  writing  reflections  insights 
january 2016
Sears Canada races to close more stores amid cost-cutting efforts - The Globe and Mail
Jan. 24, 2016 | G&M | MARINA STRAUSS - RETAILING REPORTER

Sears Canada Inc. is stepping up its efforts to close another round of stores, raising more questions about its fate and putting pressure on landlords who already have a lot of empty retail space.

The struggling Sears has instructed real estate firm CBRE to look for alternative uses for Sears’s weakest stores, such as its clearance outlets... As well, Sears officials are working internally to shrink its store network, he said....Sears’s most recent store-closing plans differ from previous shutdowns, which involved landlords often approaching Sears with offers to buy back the retailer’s store leases to replace Sears with alluring foreign retailers, such as United States-based Nordstrom Inc., which could draw more customers.

But amid the rash of retailers such as Target that have closed stores, landlords no longer have compelling new retailers to fill so much space. ...Sears is determined to turn around its core business and remain in many locations, although some may be downsized or closed when the lease expires. He hired Carrie Kirkman, a seasoned merchant, late last year as Sears’s new president, aiming to lure younger consumers with new styles and store layouts. He’s looking to improve the state of some of Sears’s stores.
Marina_Strauss  retailers  cost-cutting  commercial_real_estate  CBRE  consolidation  store_footprints  under-performing  downsizing  small_spaces  Sears_Canada  RioCan 
january 2016
Violently Wrought, Kaitlyn Greenidge interviews Marlon James - Guernica / A Magazine of Art & Politics
Kaitlyn Greenidge interviews Marlon James
November 3, 2014

Guernica: When you are inside the big book, how do you map out structure?

Marlon James: I have note sheets. I use Moleskine notebooks. I’m analog like that. I have a plot chart. I have different columns for the character, rows with different times of day, because even though it’s a big book, each chapter takes place basically in a day. So I need to know where Nina Burgess is at nine o’clock, and where she’ll be at ten. It allows me to be spontaneous. It’s sort of like how knowing prosody really liberates a poet.

If you know you have a backbone, you can bend and contort. That’s what allowed a lot of the freedom in the book. Because half of that stuff in that chart I didn’t follow. Because characters become real and they don’t take crap from you. But also because I always knew where the return line was. You can always go so far out on a limb and know you have to come back to this point. Plot charts and diagramming also stopped me from playing favorites. Because everybody had to get equal time.
**********************************************************
Marlon James: Because I want dialogue. But to come back to it—Josey Wales, for example, is slightly older than Weeper [both two gang enforcers in a ghetto of Kingston]. Josey Wales doesn’t like reggae, he doesn’t like dance hall, whereas Weeper is a street kid. He’s a nerd. He has nothing but bitterness and meanness. But they do not talk the same. In a novel that’s told by characters, your nightmare is that they end up sounding alike. Working out how different generations talk was really the challenge. Remembering things like values. It’s their value system that governs how they talk.

Guernica: In the novel, power dynamics are constantly shifting. But there’s never a sense that one character has complete or absolute power.

Marlon James: If anyone has the upper hand, then your novel loses tension. I hope I wrote a very tense novel. Tension happens because dynamics are always changing. Even if you don’t have the upper hand, you have the upper hand in an argument. You have the moral right. Especially these characters, since a lot of them are pushed into corners and make desperate decisions. I don’t buy into the all-knowing, all-smart character. Even characters who you think are minor still end up being overshadowed or beaten.
Marlon_James  writers  Caribbean  culture  violence  fiction  books  Jamaica  '70s  profile  authors  teachers  Bob_Marley  writing  analog  spontaneity  Moleskine  plot_charts  diagramming  Man_Booker  prizes 
january 2016
New Scarborough transit plan ‘buys peace in the land’ | Toronto Star
By: Jennifer Pagliaro City Hall reporter, Tess Kalinowski Transportation reporter, Published on Wed Jan 20 2016
Toronto  transit  Scarborough  TTC 
january 2016
The One Question You Should Ask About Every New Job - The New York Times
Adam Grant DEC. 19, 2015

The culture of a workplace — an organization’s values, norms and practices — has a huge impact on our happiness and success.....
But how do you figure out the culture of a company you’ve never worked for? As Nicole tried to evaluate company cultures, she kept asking the Passover question: “How is this organization different from all other organizations?” And, as with Passover, I told Nicole, the answer should come in the form of a story. Ask people to tell you a story about something that happened at their organization but wouldn’t elsewhere....If you’re still unsure where to work, start asking for stories about one practice that says a lot about a culture — a practice that consumes more than half of the time in big organizations. When people find it productive and enjoyable, that’s a good sign.
new_graduates  job_search  storytelling  organizational_culture  Managing_Your_Career  questions  Adam_Grant 
january 2016
Glenn Frey, Eagles Founding Member, Dies at 67 - The New York Times
By BRUCE WEBERJAN. 18, 2016

The band’s hit songs included yearning, battle-of-the-sexes musings like “Lyin’ Eyes” and “Heartache Tonight,” and the cool-cat lifestyle statements “Take It Easy” and “Peaceful Easy Feeling,” all of which featured Mr. Frey’s light, casual, relaxed lead vocals, as well as the No. 1 hit “Hotel California,” the band’s signature song from its 1977 album of the same name.

Its imagistic, vaguely mystical lyrics — the song was written by Mr. Frey, Mr. Henley and Don Felder — hint at a drug-fueled state of being, perhaps promising rapture, perhaps not, and have supplied fuel for countless interpretations:
singers  music  obituaries  California  '70s  songwriters  country_rock  the_Eagles  rock-'n'-roll 
january 2016
U.S. politics: The time for laughter is over - The Globe and Mail
LAWRENCE MARTIN
Fort Lauderdale, Fla. — Special to The Globe and Mail
Published Tuesday, Jan. 19, 2016
Lawrence_Martin  Campaign_2016  Donald_Trump  politics  middle_class 
january 2016
Glenn Frey, Founder of The Eagles, Dies at 67 - Speakeasy - WSJ
January 18, 2016 | WSJ | By JOHN JURGENSEN.

Glenn Frey, a founder of the Eagles who helped create some of rock’s biggest hits with fellow songwriter Don Henley, including “Hotel California” and “Lyin’ Eyes,” died Monday in New York at age 67....Frey, who would help define the California sound of the 1970s with the Eagles’ tight vocal harmonies and country-inflected rock, had his roots in the Midwest.
obituaries  singers  songwriters  '70s  music  the_Eagles  country_rock  rock-'n'-roll 
january 2016
Recharging the Canadian right - The Globe and Mail
PRESTON MANNING
Special to The Globe and Mail
Published Monday, Jan. 18, 2016

As Henry Kissinger once observed, politicians in office use up their intellectual, human and organizational capital rather than adding to it. Time out of office, wisely employed, can be used to restock the cupboard....

.....This is not to say that personal attractiveness and communications capabilities should be ignored in the recruitment of the next generation of political leaders. But if the aim of conservatives is not only to recharge the right politically, but also to be better able to govern the country as a result, putting all the renewal eggs in the charismatic leader basket would be a mistake for both conservatism and the country....
1. Greater recognition of the character traits that Canadians want to see in their elected officials – openness, honesty, transparency, integrity, compassion, humility – and making the possession of such traits a much more important factor in recruiting candidates, leaders and staff.

2. More clearly embracing those Canadian values – such as freedom, responsibility, equality of opportunity, stewardship, respect for life, democratic accountability – that conservatives want to strengthen and apply more rigorously to public policy.

3. Continue to strongly communicate the importance of trade liberalization, public-spending constraints, balanced budgets, debt reduction and tax relief.

4. Undertake a fresh round of policy development to strengthen the creative application of conservative values and principles to those areas where conservatives are, rightly or wrongly, seen to be weak or disinterested, such as poverty, inequality, health care, education, environment, science and culture.

5. Investing heavily in training conservative-oriented Canadians for more effective participation in the country’s political processes; providing more and better training for volunteers, constituency executives, campaign managers and candidates.

6. With respect to all of the above, consulting and involving ordinary Canadians at every stage – not just party insiders and elites.
Preston_Manning  conservatism  revitalization  intellectual_capital  human_capital  constituencies  rebuilding  think_tanks  political_infrastructure  institutions  politicians  institution-building  right-of-center  Canadian  values  training  Henry_Kissinger  organizational_capital  renewal  character_traits  charisma  APNSA  right-wing 
january 2016
As Germany Welcomes Migrants, Sexual Attacks in Cologne Point to a New Reality - The New York Times
By ALISON SMALE JAN. 14, 2016

In early December, the Cologne police made their New Year’s Eve preparations. Drawing on the previous year’s experience, they identified their biggest worry as pickpocketing and fireworks among the crowds. So they increased their holiday deployment, to 142 from 88, ...As 2016 neared on Dec. 31, however, some 1,500 men, including some newly arrived asylum seekers and many other immigrants, had instead assembled around Cologne’s train station. Drunk and dismissive of the police, they took advantage of an overwhelmed force to sexually assault and rob hundreds of people, according to police reports, shocking Germany and stoking anxieties over absorbing refugees across Europe....police reports and the testimony of officials and victims suggest that the officers failed to anticipate the new realities of a Germany that is now host to up to a million asylum seekers, most from war-torn Muslim countries unfamiliar with its culture. Working from outdated expectations, the police made a series of miscalculations that, officials acknowledge, allowed the situation to deteriorate. At the same time, both the police and victims say, it was not a situation any of them had encountered before. This was new terrain for all....But the commanding officer at the scene declined an offer of more than 80 reinforcements, who could have been in Cologne in an hour, according to Bernd Heinen, a senior police official, who criticized the commander for failing throughout the night to look ahead and anticipate a worsening situation....
sexual_assault  Germany  migrants  refugees  outdated  assumptions  forward_looking  preparation  miscalculations  anticipating  policing  asylum 
january 2016
Canada beware: We are suffering a great depression in commodity prices - The Globe and Mail
MICHAEL BLISS
Special to The Globe and Mail
Published Friday, Jan. 15, 2016

The Great Depression of the 1930s used to be understood as a worldwide structural crisis that was partly an adjustment to the great expansion of crop acreage and other primary industries undertaken to meet the demands of the First World War. Unfortunately the history of those years now tends to be viewed through the distorting lenses of economists fixated on monetary policy and financial crisis management.

They thought that the crisis of 2008 might become a replay of the 1930s. For the most part they have not realized that it is today’s global depression in commodity prices that has eerie echoes of the great crack-up. If it’s true that we have overexpanded our productive capacity to meet the demands of Chinese growth, and if that growth is now going to slow, or even cease, then history is worrisomely on the verge of repeating itself....One sign of the beginning of wisdom is to be able to shed illusions. Make no mistake. Right now, the world is experiencing a great depression in commodity prices, led by the collapse of oil, that represents an enormous shrinkage in the valuation of our wealth. As a country whose wealth is still highly dependent on the returns we can get from selling our natural resources, Canada is very vulnerable. In a time of price depression, our wealth bleeds away.
'30s  adjustments  commodities  commodities_supercycle  economic_downturn  Great_Depression  historians  history  illusions  Michael_Bliss  natural_resources  overcapacity  pricing  overexpansion  slow_growth  wisdom  WWI 
january 2016
How To Moderate a Panel Like a Pro
State your objective at the outset. Don’t write a long-winded introduction. Two sentences will do. Why is this topic important now, and what do you hope to accomplish with
panels  panel_moderation  conferences  LBMA 
january 2016
Jeffrey Simpson: Slow growth now, no growth later - The Globe and Mail
JEFFREY SIMPSON
Slow growth now, no growth later
SUBSCRIBERS ONLY
The Globe and Mail
Published Wednesday, Jan. 13,2016

The population is aging. Commodity prices are low. Oil and natural gas prices are hitting rock-bottom. The Canadian dollar has plummeted. Most governments are in deficit, or heading into deficit (read Ottawa). Innovation and the commercialization of research lag that of other countries. Productivity, the country’s long-term bugbear, remains sluggish....all the green traffic signals have turned to yellow or red. Yet this slow-growth economy, which might persist for a long time, is wrapped in a political culture that seems to favour slow or no growth, or seems to think that government infrastructure programs, useful in themselves, will solve the long-run problems.....Everywhere, projects are blocked or delayed, because environmentalists, aboriginal people, non-governmental organizations or even provincial governments oppose them....Many of these blocked or delayed projects with large-scale economic spinoffs are natural resource projects, which the federal government says might be saved with more “robust” oversight. The government is kidding itself in this belief, since the opponents don’t care what the regulatory process is. They oppose development pure, simple and always.

Far beyond natural resource constipation, the contradiction arises between slow growth and the huge desire of citizens for more government services, without higher taxes. Of special concern is Canada’s persistent low productivity, to which no easy answer exists, except that a slow-growth mentality doesn’t help.

...Don Drummond, working with Evan Capeluck, recently explained the challenge in a paper for the Centre for the Study of Living Standards, which looked at productivity trends in all provinces. Projecting these trends forward, they said most provinces and territories will not be able to balance revenue growth with new spending demands (especially for health care) without higher taxes or spending cuts.

Put another way, unless long-term growth can be improved – a trend that will require productivity improvements – Canada is heading for a poorer future with fewer programs and/or higher taxes.
growth  Jeffrey_Simpson  economic_downturn  anti-development  natural_resources  economic_stagnation  megaprojects  productivity  Don_Drummond  slow_growth  low_growth  weak_dollar  signals 
january 2016
The United States shouldn’t take sides in the Sunni-Shiite struggle - The Washington Post
By Fareed Zakaria Opinion writer

...the most significant trend shaping the region today is something different: Sunnis vs. Shiites. That sectarian struggle now infects almost every aspect of the region’s politics....Though there always was tension, Sunnis and Shiites did live in peace, for the most part, until recently.....The pivotal shift took place in 1979. The Islamic Revolution in Iran brought to power an aggressively religious ruling class, determined to export its ideas and support Shiites in the region.....Saudi Arabia is facing a series of challenges, from the Islamic State to domestic extremists. The country’s large and active social media are dominated by radical Islamists. And as oil prices plunge, government revenue has collapsed, and the nation’s generous subsidies to its people will be hard to sustain. The regime needs greater legitimacy.
Fareed_Zakaria  Sunni  Shiites  schisms  Middle_East  U.S.foreign_policy  frameworks  sectarian  religion  trends  Iran  Wahhabism  extremism  Yemen  geopolitics  Saudi_Arabia 
january 2016
The making of the next big food trend - The Globe and Mail
ANN HUI
National Food Reporter The Globe and Mail Last updated: Tuesday, Jan. 12, 2016
pulses  trends  food  grains 
january 2016
Price of fresh produce to soar while loonie plunges - The Globe and Mail
ALEKSANDRA SAGAN
TORONTO — The Canadian Press
Published Tuesday, Jan. 12, 2016
fresh_produce  pricing  OPMA 
january 2016
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