recentpopularlog in
« earlier   later »
Anilingus: The Other Oral Sex | Alternet
By Kali Holloway / AlterNet January 30, 2015
sex  oral_sex 
march 2016
Sourcing External Technology for Innovation
Sourcing External Technology for Innovation
By
Stewart Witzeman
Gene Slowinski
Ryan Dirkx
Lawrence Gollob
John Tao
Susan Ward
Sal Miraglia
Mondelez  LBMA 
march 2016
How do we fill the pipeline with board-ready women?
This commentary is part of Work in Progress, The Globe's look at the global struggle for gender parity.Pamela Warren is a Toronto-based partner at Egon Zehnder, which specializes in executive search
boards_&_directors_&_governance  talent_pipelines  women  howto 
march 2016
City proposes Queen Street route for Toronto’s downtown relief line - The Globe and Mail
OLIVER MOORE - URBAN TRANSPORTATION REPORTER
The Globe and Mail
Published Friday, Jan. 29, 2016
DRL  transit  TTC  Toronto 
march 2016
How to Avoid the Innovation Death Spiral | Innovation Management
By: Wouter Koetzier

Consider this all too familiar scenario: Company X’s new products developed and launched with great expectations, yield disappointing results. Yet, these products continue to languish in the market, draining management attention, advertising budgets, manufacturing capacity, warehouse space and back office systems. Wouter Koetzier explores how to avoid the innovation death spiral....
Incremental innovations play a role in defending a company’s baseline against competition, rather than offering customers superior benefits or creating additional demand for its products.
Platform innovations drive some market growth (often due to premium pricing rather than expanded volume), but their main function is to increase the innovator’s market share by giving customers a reason to switch from a competitor’s brand.
Breakthrough innovations create a new market that the innovator can dominate for some time by delivering new benefits to customers. Contrary to conventional wisdom, breakthrough innovations typically aren’t based upon major technological inventions; rather, they often harness existing technology in novel ways, such as Apple’s iPad.......A recent Accenture analysis of 10 large players in the global foods industry over a three-year period demonstrates the strategic costs of failure to innovate successfully. Notably, the study found little correlation between R&D spending and revenue growth. For instance, a company launching more products than their competitors actually saw less organic revenue growth. That’s because the company made only incremental innovations, while its competitors launched a balanced portfolio of incremental, platform and breakthrough innovations that were perceived by the market as adding value.
Accenture  attrition_rates  baselines  breakthroughs  correlations  disappointment  downward_spirals  howto  incrementalism  innovation  kill_rates  life_cycle  portfolios  portfolio_management  platforms  LBMA  marginal_improvements  Mondelez  moonshots  new_products  novel  product_development  product_launches  R&D  taxonomy 
march 2016
Sunday Suppers: Sicilian Braciole - Baker by Nature
SUNDAY SUPPERS: SICILIAN BRACIOLE
/// April 6th, 2014
Italian  beef  recipes 
march 2016
Trump is the GOP’s Frankenstein monster. Now he’s strong enough to destroy the party. - The Washington Post
By Robert Kagan February 25

Then there was the party’s accommodation to and exploitation of the bigotry in its ranks. No, the majority of Republicans are not bigots. But they have certainly been enablers. Who began the attack on immigrants — legal and illegal — long before Trump arrived on the scene and made it his premier issue? Who frightened Mitt Romney into selling his soul in 2012, talking of “self-deportation” to get himself right with the party’s anti-immigrant forces? Who opposed any plausible means of dealing with the genuine problem of illegal immigration, forcing Sen. Marco Rubio (R-Fla.) to cower, abandon his principles — and his own immigration legislation — lest he be driven from the presidential race before it had even begun? It was not Trump. It was not even party yahoos. It was Republican Party pundits and intellectuals, trying to harness populist passions and perhaps deal a blow to any legislation for which President Obama might possibly claim even partial credit. What did Trump do but pick up where they left off, tapping the well-primed gusher of popular anger, xenophobia and, yes, bigotry that the party had already unleashed?
Obama  Campaign_2016  Donald_Trump  GOP  bigotry  politics  obstructionism 
march 2016
JetBlue Venture Capital Unit Taking Cautious Approach to Growth - The CIO Report - WSJ
Mar 3, 2016 ROLE OF THE CIO
JetBlue Venture Capital Unit Taking Cautious Approach to Growth
ARTICLE
COMMENTS
EASH SUNDARAM
JETBLUE
1
By STEVEN NORTON
JetBlue  Silicon_Valley  data  data_driven  venture_capital  CIOs  airline_industry  travel  hospitality  massive_data_sets  innovation  corporate_investors 
march 2016
Thane Stenner: Here’s where the wealthy get their investment ‘edge’
Mar. 02, 2016 | The Globe and Mail | THANE STENNER.

They have clear investment goals: High-net-worth individuals are obsessive goal setters. They always know why they’re investing (beyond “to make money”). They reverse-engineer their return objectives to meet both long- and short-term goals.

They know when to delegate: High-net-worth investors are not “do-it-yourself” investors.

They think risk first: High-net-worth individuals are generally focused on wealth protection as much as wealth generation.

It’s business: In general, high-net-worth investors tend to be good at “segregating” their emotions from their investment decisions.

They keep the news in perspective: Most wealthy individuals are news junkies. Of course they listen to, digest, and consider a lot of financial news. But the focus of their attention is on long-term trends, not necessarily up-to-the-minute financial data. And they think very, very carefully before making any decision based on news.

They seize the opportunity in crisis: Most high-net-worth individuals are born contrarians.
high_net_worth  slight_edge  investing  investors  rules_of_the_game  Thane_Stenner  goal-setting  contrarians  reverse_engineering  wealth_protection  kairos  impact_investing  passions  passion_investing  calm  Carpe_diem  Michael_McDerment  thinking_deliberatively  thinking_backwards  work-back_schedules 
march 2016
Super Tuesday was a referendum on racism - The Globe and Mail
SARAH KENDZIOR
Contributed to The Globe and Mail
Published Wednesday, Mar. 02, 2016
Campaign_2016  racism  slavery 
march 2016
Degrees of separation - FT.com
February 26, 2016 | FT | Jonathan Derbyshire.

The best work is created within an interaction between two subjects. Take Zuckerberg - computer science + psychology = billionaire. Even having a broad knowledge of various subjects enables an entrepreneur to flourish.

Moral of the story............keep learning.

ReportShare6RecommendReply
apt-get 1 day ago
@Sunny spot on. Liberal arts, STEM...these are just starting points. Continual learning and diversity of knowledge are considerably more powerful.

++++++++++++++++++++++++++
From David Brooks....Third, the age seems to reward procedural architects (e.g. Facebook, Twitter, Wikipedia, etc. , people who can design an architecture/platform that allows other people to express ideas or to collaborate. Fourth, people who can organize a decentralized network around a clear question, without letting it dissipate or clump, will have enormous value. Fifth, essentialists will probably be rewarded--the ability to grasp the essence of one thing, and then the essence of some very different thing, and smash them together to create some entirely new thing. Sixth, the computer is the computer. The role of the human is not to be dispassionate, depersonalized or neutral. It is precisely the emotive traits that are rewarded: the voracious lust for understanding, the enthusiasm for work, the ability to grasp the gist, the empathetic sensitivity to what will attract attention and linger in the mind.
liberal_arts  STEM  billgates  Steve_Jobs  Colleges_&_Universities  CEOs  career_paths  cross-disciplinary  Vinod_Khosla  intellectual_diversity 
february 2016
Fifteen Dogs is a novel on whether pups or humans live happier - The Globe and Mail
JOSÉ TEODORO
Special to The Globe and Mail
Published Friday, Apr. 10, 201
fiction  Toronto 
february 2016
Anchors Away: Malls Lose More Department Store Tenants - WSJ
By LIAM PLEVEN
Updated Feb. 23, 2016

The rise of online shopping and changing consumer habits are battering the big department stores known as anchors that once lured shoppers to malls—leaving landlords with empty space and forcing them to undertake expensive overhauls to stay relevant.
shopping_malls  commercial_real_estate  retailers  LBMA  e-commerce 
february 2016
New Liberal government, same old litany - The Globe and Mail
PRESTON MANNING
Special to The Globe and Mail
Published Friday, Feb. 26, 2016
op-ed  Preston_Manning  Liberals  deficits  debt  Justin_Trudeau 
february 2016
One unresponsive hour on Twitter could harm your brand - The Globe and Mail
MIA PEARSON
Special to The Globe and Mail
Published Thursday, Feb. 25, 2016
branding  brands  Twitter 
february 2016
The Apple Case Will Grope Its Way Into Your Future - The New York Times
Farhad Manjoo
STATE OF THE ART FEB. 24, 2016

In an Internet of Things world, every home appliance could be turned into a listening post. That’s why the Apple case matters. ... controversy over whether Apple should be forced to unlock an iPhone
Apple  FBI  privacy  Industrial_Internet  connected_devices  Farhad_Manjoo  home_appliances  encryption  surveillance  civil_liberties  cryptography  iPhone 
february 2016
Philip Knight of Nike to Give $400 Million to Stanford Scholars - The New York Times
By ALESSANDRA STANLEY FEB. 24, 2016

megagifts to elite universities have their critics, who argue they are more about prestige and ego than academic excellence. “This is just part of the crazy arms race between the top schools with no connection to reality,” said Malcolm Gladwell, a writer for The New Yorker and the author of “The Tipping Point” who posted scathing Twitter messages last year about Mr. Paulson’s gift to Harvard. “If Stanford cut its endowment in half and gave it to other worthy institutions,” he said, “then the world really would be a better place.”

According to the Council for Aid to Education, less than 1 percent of the nation’s colleges received 28.7 percent of all gifts in 2015.
Philip_Knight  Nike  entrepreneur  philanthropy  Stanford  Colleges_&_Universities  problem_solving  scholarships  elitism  endowments  prestige  ego 
february 2016
From terrorism to technological disruption: Leaders need to tackle risk - The Globe and Mail
DAVID ISRAELSON
Special to The Globe and Mail
Published Wednesday, Jan. 27, 2016

“Not only do they have to think about and worry about economic changes and what their competitors are going to do, they now have a whole new level of political and regulatory risk,” Ms. Ecker says.

“You can’t predict in some cases how a policy maker is going to move. We’re seeing that in China now.”

At the beginning of 2016, as markets began a steep slide in China, that country’s regulators twice activated a “circuit breaker” mechanism to halt trading, only to abandon it after it appeared to make the drop in the market even worse.

The lesson is that sometimes “business practices and even business products that seem acceptable today, for whatever reason, when something happens can be considered things you shouldn’t be doing. There’s more policy unpredictability than ever before,” Ms. Ecker says.

“In an increasingly risky world, a CEO needs to be increasingly flexible and adaptable. You also need to have a team and know what the latest threat might be.”

That isn’t necessarily easy, she adds. “There’s no rule book. When I was in politics, people used to ask me what we should anticipate. I’d tell them, ‘Read science fiction books.’ ”....CEOs in today’s risky world also need people skills that may not have been necessary before, says Shaharris Beh, director of Hackernest, a Toronto-based not-for-profit group that connects worldwide tech companies.

“CEOs have always needed strong skills around rapid decision-making and failure mitigation. In today’s hypercompetitive startup business climate, leaders need two more: pivot-resilience and proleptic consensus leadership,” he says.

“Pivot-resilience is the ability to tolerate the stress of gut-wrenching risks when dramatically shifting strategy. In other words, be able to take the blame gracefully while still warranting respect among your team members.”

Proleptic consensus leadership is especially important for startups, Mr. Beh says. “It’s the ability to garner the team’s support for taking big risks by giving them the assurance of what backup plans are in place should things go sour.”

This consensus building “is how you keep support,” he adds. In a volatile economy, “people can jump ship at any time or even unintentionally sabotage things if they’re not convinced a particular course of action will work.” So you have to constantly persuade.
science_fiction  law_firms  law  risks  CEOs  risk-management  disruption  BLG  leaders  pivots  resilience  consensus  risk-taking  contingency_planning  unpredictability  political_risk  regulatory_risk  policymakers  flexibility  adaptability  anticipating  people_skills  circuit_breakers 
february 2016
The Life of a Song: War
February 13/14, 2016 | Financial Times | David Honigmann
Bob_Marley  reggae  '70s  music  singers  songwriters 
february 2016
Life lessons from original thinkers
Jan. 9, 2016 | The Financial Times. (): Business News: p5. |
Simon Kuper

'Our era undervalues original thinkers, because we tend to rank people by their fame and money'

One nice thing about m...
Simon_Kuper  life_skills  lessons_learned  iconoclasts  originality  life_lessons 
february 2016
What Comes After Apps - WSJ
By CHRISTOPHER MIMS
Updated Feb. 22, 2016

The first and most intriguing alternative to apps is chat. This is hard to understand for anyone who hasn’t spent time in Asia or at least read about the dominance of WeChat and its competitors, but in China chat apps are used for everything from hailing a car to paying for your Coke at a vending machine.

Kik, a chat app that doesn’t get as much attention as rivals but for U.S. teens is on par with Facebook Messenger and Snapchat in terms of users and importance, will roll out similar functionality within six months, says Chief Executive Ted Livingston.

A growing share of these commercial chats take place with so-called chat bots—interactive computer programs that prompt users to select from among several options, for example. Imagine scanning a chat code on the back of the seat in front of you at a ballpark and having a brief conversation with a chat bot about how many and what kind of beers you want to order.

Chat, says Mr. Livingston, could manage most of the real-world interactions that previously would have required us to visit a mobile Web page, download an app, or—in some cases—give up in frustration with a phone’s constraints. Chat apps won’t solve the walled-garden problem of apps, but they could at least create lightweight interactions with services that happen in seconds and don’t require us to spend time downloading or loading anything.

A TechCrunch article in January indicated that Facebook will soon reveal similar technology within its Messenger app. At least at first, building chat bots that work on any chat app should be easier for developers, because they have similar interfaces. Chat, in other words, could become the new Web browser.
bots  chat  chatbots  Christopher_Mims  conversational_commerce  Facebook  Kik  lightweight_interactions  messaging  mobile_applications  walled_gardens  WeChat 
february 2016
Looking Back - The New Yorker
FEBRUARY 29, 2016 ISSUE

Looking Back
BY JEFFREY TOOBIN
Antonin_Scalia  U.S._Supreme_Court  tributes  law  lawyers  judges  legacies 
february 2016
Africa Bruised by Investor Exodus - WSJ
By MATINA STEVIS
Feb. 21, 2016 5:30 a.m. ET

Fund managers say assets in African nations are being punished because of their disproportionate reliance on resources and failure to use the commodity boom of recent years to industrialize their economies. In Angola, Nigeria and Equatorial Guinea, oil counts for more than 90% of export revenue, while copper counts for more than 70% of export revenue in Zambia.

“There’s a reaction to a year ago, to the euphoria of new investors coming into Africa,” said Stuart Culverhouse, an economist with Exotix, a London-based frontier fund and advisory firm. “They are trying to get out now, and they are being quite indiscriminate.”

The upshot is that frontier investors are moving their money from Africa to Asian countries like Pakistan, Bangladesh and Vietnam; net energy and commodity importers which have shown more commitment to industrialization.
Africa  investors  private_equity  commodities  China  Barclays  exodus  frontier_markets  natural_resources 
february 2016
London lives again: Inside the revival in Ontario’s rust belt - The Globe and Mail
JOHN IBBITSON
LONDON, ONT. The Globe and Mail Last updated: Friday, Feb. 05, 2016

Synergies between the education sector and the private sector lie at the very heart of Southwestern Ontario’s future. By incubating, encouraging and then feeding workers into London’s emerging high-technology sector, Western and Fanshawe are doing for their city what the University of Waterloo has long been doing for Kitchener-Waterloo’s computer-based industries and the University of Guelph is doing for bio-technology in Guelph.
John_Ibbitson  rust_belt  manufacturers  job_loss  revitalization  Southwestern_Ontario  entrepreneur  automotive_industry  UWO  Kitchener-Waterloo  synergies 
february 2016
Which Type of Exercise Is Best for the Brain? - The New York Times
By GRETCHEN REYNOLDS FEBRUARY 17, 2016

For the first time, scientists compared head-to-head the neurological impacts of different types of exercise: running, weight training and high-intensity interval training. The surprising results suggest that going hard may not be the best option for long-term brain health......if you currently weight train or exclusively work out with intense intervals, continue. But perhaps also thread in an occasional run or bike ride for the sake of your hippocampal health.
exercise  fitness  health  medical  strength_training  intensity  high-intensity  interval_training  high-impact 
february 2016
The Life of A Song: Good Times
February 5, 2016 | FT|

Chic’s last-gasp salute to disco was inspired by the Great Depression and the Harlem Renaissance
music  '70s  disco  African-Americans  Harlem_Renaissance  Great_Depression 
february 2016
Toronto policing was better with Peter Sloly: Cole | Toronto Star
By: Desmond Cole Published on Thu Feb 11 2016

"“We run around all over the city in the most unfocused way, reacting to what you call us for, as opposed to trying to understand what’s going on and . . . putting our most important resources in the best place,” he said."
Toronto_Police_Service  resignations  retirements  policing  unfocused  Desmond_Cole 
february 2016
Sloly was too smart and progressive for his own good: James | Toronto Star
By: Royson James Toronto Politics, Published on Thu Feb 11 2016

The Toronto Police Service is poorer with the departure of reform-minded Deputy Chief Peter Sloly, but it’s hard to imagine him staying.
policing  retirements  Toronto_Police_Service  Royson_James 
february 2016
Steve Golin: Hollywood’s Anonymous Power Player - WSJ
By JOHN JURGENSEN
Feb. 11, 2016

Anonymous Content also assembled the popular dramas “True Detective,” “The Knick” and “Mr. Robot,” which won a Golden Globe for best TV drama on the same night “The Revenant” dominated the film categories.

Though his company is just one hub in Hollywood’s sprawling machinery of financiers, talent agencies, production companies and distributors, Mr. Golin’s career mirrors the changes reshaping the industry......He turned elsewhere, five years ago, when he saw “House of Cards” sold to Netflix as a two-season package complete with movie stars and director David Fincher. He told his staff to double down on its then-slight television business. Anonymous expects to have 11 series on the air this year, including new shows on Netflix, Hulu and cable channels such as Starz. While a movie is usually a one-off for production fees and other revenue, TV shows can keep on giving over numerous seasons.

Anonymous is a rare example of a production company that moved into talent management.
doubling_down  Hollywood  films  movies  entrepreneur  entertainment  entertainment_industry  talent_representation  packaging  prolificacy 
february 2016
The Rise of the Platform Economy - The CIO Report - WSJ
Feb 12, 2016 | WSJ | By IRVING WLADAWSKY-BERGER.

A platform or complement strategy differs from a product strategy in that it requires an external ecosystem to generate complementary product or service innovations and build positive feedback between the complements and the platform. The effect is much greater potential for innovation and growth than a single product-oriented firm can generate alone.”

The importance of platforms is closely linked to the concept of network effects: The more products or services it offers, the more users it will attract. Scale increases the platform’s value, helping it attract more complementary offerings which in turn brings in more users, which then makes the platform even more valuable… and on and on and on.
Alibaba  Apple  Facebook  Google  IBM  Microsoft  scaling  economies_of_scale  Uber  Salesforce  platforms  ecosystems  network_effects  Irving_Wladawsky-Berger 
february 2016
Toronto’s tech startup scene in a ‘blossom state’ - The Globe and Mail
SHANE DINGMAN - TECHNOLOGY REPORTER
TORONTO — The Globe and Mail
Published Sunday, Feb. 14, 2016
Freshbooks  Toronto  MaRS  fin-tech  start_ups 
february 2016
Zen and the art of banking - Western Alumni
 Alumni Gazette  Winter 2016
Zen and the art of banking

by David Scott
alumni  Ivey  banking  financial_services  motorcycles  CEOs 
february 2016
Twilight of the Brands
FEBRUARY 17 & 24, 2014 | - The New Yorker | BY JAMES SUROWIECKI.

** “Absolute Value,” by Itamar Simonson and Emanuel Rosen,

It’s a truism of business-book thinking that a company’s brand is its “most important asset,” more valuable than technology or patents or manufacturing prowess. But brands have never been more fragile. The reason is simple: consumers are supremely well informed and far more likely to investigate the real value of products than to rely on logos. “Absolute Value,” a new book by Itamar Simonson, a marketing professor at Stanford, and Emanuel Rosen, a former software executive, shows that, historically, the rise of brands was a response to an information-poor environment. When consumers had to rely on advertisements and their past experience with a company, brands served as proxies for quality; if a car was made by G.M., or a ketchup by Heinz, you assumed that it was pretty good. It was hard to figure out if a new product from an unfamiliar company was reliable or not, so brand loyalty was a way of reducing risk. As recently as the nineteen-eighties, nearly four-fifths of American car buyers stayed loyal to a brand.

Today, consumers can read reams of research about whatever they want to buy. This started back with Consumer Reports, which did objective studies of products, and with J. D. Power’s quality rankings, which revealed what ordinary customers thought of the cars they’d bought. But what’s really weakened the power of brands is the Internet, which has given ordinary consumers easy access to expert reviews, user reviews, and detailed product data, in an array of categories.
Achilles’_heel  books  brands  Consumer_Reports  customer_loyalty  decline  fragility  GM  information-poor  information-rich  J.D._Power  James_Surowiecki  Kraft_Heinz  Lululemon  new_products 
february 2016
The Choices That Led Small Business Owners to Wealth - The New York Times
FEB. 12, 2016 | NYT | By PAUL SULLIVAN

have to make decisions to professionalize the business, put systems in place and have a plan that allows them to do longer-term planning. Those decisions can make the difference between being a small-business owner and a business executive with significant wealth....“There is no bright-line test when a company gets to a certain size or age to do these things,” said Kevin M. Harris, head of the family business group at Northern Trust. “It is based on where the company wants to go.”

Determining which decisions were the ones that made the difference is sometimes not an easy task, and the stories that are retold are often the ones that turned out well. Yet it is worth considering what can go wrong.

Entrepreneurs who failed to find success were often resistant to change
small_business  wealth_creation  decision_making  entrepreneur  risk-taking  mindsets  JCK  thinking_tragically  Northern_Trust  owners  private_banking  choices  internal_systems  professionalization  high_net_worth 
february 2016
Gearing Up for the Cloud, AT&T Tells Its Workers: Adapt, or Else - The New York Times
FEB. 13, 2016| NYT | By QUENTIN HARDY.

For the company to survive in this environment, Mr. Stephenson needs to retrain its 280,000 employees so they can improve their coding skills, or learn them, and make quick business decisions based on a fire hose of data coming into the company.....Learn new skills or find your career choices are very limited.

“There is a need to retool yourself, and you should not expect to stop,”....People who do not spend five to 10 hours a week in online learning, he added, “will obsolete themselves with the technology.” .......By 2020, Mr. Stephenson hopes AT&T will be well into its transformation into a computing company that manages all sorts of digital things: phones, satellite television and huge volumes of data, all sorted through software managed in the cloud.

That can’t happen unless at least some of his work force is retrained to deal with the technology. It’s not a young group: The average tenure at AT&T is 12 years, or 22 years if you don’t count the people working in call centers. And many employees don’t have experience writing open-source software or casually analyzing terabytes of customer data. .......By 2020, Mr. Stephenson hopes AT&T will be well into its transformation into a computing company that manages all sorts of digital things: phones, satellite television and huge volumes of data, all sorted through software managed in the cloud.

.......“Everybody is going to go face to face with a Google, an Amazon, a Netflix,” he said. “You compete based on data, and based on customer insights you get with their permission. If we’re wrong, it won’t play well for anyone here.
Quentin_Hardy  AT&T  cloud_computing  data  retraining  reinvention  skills  self-education  virtualization  data_scientists  new_products  online_training  e-learning  customer_insights  Google  Amazon  Netflix  data_driven 
february 2016
« earlier      later »
per page:    204080120160

Copy this bookmark:





to read