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Moving targets; Smartphones and tablets
What advertisers love, and what they hate, about mobile devices

MARKETERS' MANTRA OF reaching "the right person, with the right message, at the right time" has become a lot more achievable in the p...
geofencing  location_based_services  native_advertising  advertising  mobile_phones  mobile  smartphones  tablet_computing  beacons  the_right_people 
february 2017
Leaner and meaner; Advertising agencies
Technology has made life harder for admen, but they will not disappear

GAUGING THE STATE of health of the advertising industry is easy: just stroll along the waterfront in Cannes when the admen hol...
advertising_agencies  WPP  Martin_Sorrell  Publicis  ad-tech  Omnicom 
february 2017
Virtual beauty parade; Publishers
Technology has put the squeeze on publishers in online advertising

BREAKFAST CEREALS ARE usually harmless enough, but Kellogg's, which makes a lot of them, has become many publishers' worst nightma...
Kelloggs  publishing  Google  Facebook  behavioural_targeting  programmatic 
february 2017
The world wild web; The future
These days advertisers are feeling less certain of themselves. They are still trying to come to grips with the radical changes technology has brought to the way advertising is consumed, sold and perso...
future  advertising  privacy  personalization  David_Ogilvy  tradeoffs 
february 2017
Little Brother
Sep 11th 2014 | The Economist | Alexandra Suich.

In 1963 David Ogilvy, the father of Madison Avenue and author of a classic business book, “Confessions of an Advertising Man”, wrote: “An advertisement is like a radar sweep, constantly hunting new prospects as they come into the market. Get a good radar, and keep it sweeping.”.....Behavioural profiling has gone viral across the internet, enabling firms to reach users with specific messages based on their location, interests, browsing history and demographic group......Extreme personalisation in advertising has been slow to come... online advertising space is unlimited and prices are low, so making money is not as easy as it was in the offline world,.....Digital advertising is being buoyed by three important trends. The first is the rise of mobile devices, such as smartphones....The second, related trend is the rise of social networks such as Facebook, Twitter and Pinterest, which have become an important navigation system for people looking for content across the web. ......The third big development has been the rise of real-time bidding, or “programmatic buying”, a new system for targeting consumers precisely and swiftly with online adverts. Publishers, advertisers and intermediaries can now bid for digital ads electronically and direct them to specific consumers at lightning speed.....The lines between established media businesses are becoming blurred. Richard Edelman, the boss of Edelman, a public-relations firm, describes the media and advertising business as a “mosh pit”. .... clients’ biggest question is whether people will even notice their ads. ...This special report will show that technology is profoundly changing the dynamics of advertising. Building on the vast amount of data produced by consumers’ digital lives, it is giving more power to media companies that have a direct relationship with their customers and can track them across different devices. ....Consumers may gain from advertising tailored to their particular needs, and so far most of them seem content to accept the ensuing loss of privacy. But companies are sensitive to the potential costs of overstepping the mark. As the head of one British advertising firm puts it: “Once people realise what’s happening, I can’t imagine there won’t be pushback.”
Facebook  Twitter  Pinterest  Ogilvy_&_Mather  David_Ogilvy  behavioural_targeting  pushback  books  effectiveness  haystacks  privacy  native_advertising  ad-tech  Conversant  Kraft  personalization  trends  mobile_phones  smartphones  social_media  real-time  auctions  programmatic  advertising  online_advertising  Omnicom 
february 2017
Stoics in Silicon Valley learn to manage disappointment
17 Dec. 2016 |Financial Times | Byline: Philip Delves Broughton.
* Stoicism is the new Zen, a rediscovered set of ideas that seem tailor-made for a period of rapid change.
* The Obstacle Is the Way: The Timeless Art of Turning Trials Into Triumph by Ryan Holiday
* Keep moving forward

History will one day tell us more about the meeting this week between Donald Trump and the biggest names in Silicon Valley. We will find out why these usually swagge...
books  disappointment  endurance  Jim_Collins  joyless  MLK  next_play  Philip_Delves_Broughton  rapid_change  Romans  Ryan_Holiday  Silicon_Valley  Stoics  suffering  tough-mindedness  Vietnam_War 
february 2017
A Lesson in Black History - The New York Times
Charles M. Blow FEB. 6, 2017

Let’s be absolutely clear here: Frederick Douglass is a singular, towering figure of American history. The entire legacy of black intellectual thought and civil rights activism flows in some way through Douglass, from W.E.B. DuBois to Booker T. Washington, to the Rev. Dr. Martin Luther King Jr., to President Barack Obama himself.

Douglass was one of the most brilliant thinkers, writers and orators America has ever produced. Furthermore, he harnessed and mastered the media of his day: Writing an acclaimed autobiography, establishing his own newspaper and becoming the most photographed American of the 19th century.
history  Frederick_Douglass  Charles_Blow  legacies  19th_century  African-Americans  MLK 
february 2017
Black Lives, White Lies and Emmett Till - The New York Times
By THE EDITORIAL BOARDFEB. 6, 2017
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cold_cases  Jim_Crow  history  white_supremacy  killings  civil_rights  bigotry  Emmett_Till  the_South  FBI  lying  lynchings 
february 2017
Dumping a Bad App? Tips for a Painless Breakup - The New York Times
By BRIAN X. CHEN JAN. 25, 2017.

When to Call It Quits

No app is perfect, but you have to draw the line somewhere. The problem is, you may be in such a rut that you can’t recognize the warning signs.

(1) An obvious one is when an app stops working reliably in a way that affects your life.
(2) dump an app when it has stopped improving.
(3) when you have nobody to talk to... . If an app’s audience is a ghost town — like Yahoo’s photo-sharing app, Flickr, which sank in popularity after mobile photo-sharing services like Instagram emerged — then it’s probably time to leave.

Getting Out

The hardest part of breaking up with an app is moving your data. So as a rule of thumb, save a backup copy of your data so that you can export it into a new app. Then carefully search for a better app to suit your needs.

As a safety measure before changing apps, you should always keep extra copies of your data somewhere, whether it be in the cloud with a service like Dropbox or on a physical hard drive. When companies don’t provide convenient tools to export your data, look elsewhere by doing a quick web search for solutions. There are plenty of people in the same boat as you, and chances are they have written scripts, or lightweight programs, to automatically pull out your data for you.

If there is no convenient way to export your data, sometimes it doesn’t hurt to just take out what is most important to you. Perhaps you don’t need five-year-old notes from Evernote anymore, so you could just manually paste your latest memos and get a fresh start with a different app.

Finding a New App

On the bright side, you can learn a lot from a tough breakup with an app — which can be especially useful when looking for a replacement.

The biggest lessons: Pick a tool that supports a wide array of formats instead of proprietary ones. And before you commit to a new app, make sure it is as easy to get out as it is to get in.

Fantastical 2 for iPhone

The fast and friendly calendar and reminders app, packed full of features to make you even more productive.
mobile_applications  exits  howto  productivity  warning_signs  breakups 
february 2017
Advertisers Try New Tactics to Break Through to Consumers - WSJ
By SUZANNE VRANICA
June 19, 2016

companies are rewriting their marketing playbooks. Some are blurring the line between advertising and content, in the hopes of passing through the filter of what consumers actually see and read. Others are diving deeper into data and location targeting on the theory that consumers will embrace ads that they find relevant.......Marketers have been drawn to digital advertising because of the promise of targeting consumers with more precision. But the backlash over the quantity and intrusiveness of digital marketing, and the adoption of ad blockers, is forcing them to figure out other ways to capture users’ attention......Advertisers like Coldwell Banker Real Estate LLC are embracing so-called native ads, which seamlessly blend into a user’s feed and are harder to distinguish from editorial content.

“Native ads have 50% higher click-through rates than any of our [display] banner inventory,” ....Alison Lewis, chief marketing officer of J&J’s consumer business, said that for decades, the company would create two 30-second TV spots, two billboard ads and five print ads every year. That is “not how the world works today,” she said.
advertising  offensive_tactics  Johnson_&_Johnson  Netflix  content  backlash  location_based_services  Coldwell_Banker  marketing  precision  target_marketing  playbooks 
february 2017
Political leadership in the Caribbean –
Feb 05, 2017 Features | Kaieteur News | By Sir Ronald Sanders.

The aspirations of today’s Caribbean leaders are no different to Castro’s; their circumstances are different. Caribbean economies are small and, when there is an economic downturn or some major calamity in the countries with which we trade or from which our foreign investment comes, our economies become constrained. It’s not that the leaders would not like to do better, they are operating in restricted circumstances, and they do the best they can. They have no champion as Castro had with the Soviet Union.
But, they miss opportunities by not doing more together. .....CARICOM is a valuable tool for the advancement of the Caribbean people and for Caribbean countries individually and collectively. Unfortunately, since independence, a kind of false nationalism has crept into our psyche; one which, in some cases, cannot admit to being as much a citizen of the Caribbean region as a national of a country within it. Part of the reason is that leaders don’t give effective leadership on this issue.....In almost every Caribbean country, there exists an anathema to migrants from other Caribbean countries, displayed particularly at Airports where Caribbean people face discrimination.......There has not been sufficient advocacy of Caribbean integration by the leadership of the region to help people to understand that, whether or not we came in the same ship, we are now in the same boat and that boat is in turbulent waters. All of us in that boat have to row it together, if not we will sink together....The point is that our circumstances are such that we need each other; no single country in the Caribbean – none, not Trinidad and Tobago, with its oil and gas resources, not Guyana with its vast land and natural resources, not Jamaica with its large population can survive on its own.
The world is tough, and it is only by the marrying and integrating of our resources at all levels that we can hope to do better. If we continue to let integration languish, I am afraid we are writing our own suicide drama and we are acting it out. We have to overcome it. And, political leadership matters – from governing and opposition parties alike.............
Caribbean  Caricom  coalitions  collective_action  competitiveness_of_nations  constraints  disunity  human_psyche  integration  leadership  loyal_opposition  missed_opportunities  nationalism  parochialism  politicians  small_states  strategic_alliances 
february 2017
Mobile Ad Targeting Is Improving, According to Nielsen - WSJ
By JACK MARSHALL
Nov. 22, 2016

Ad targeting accuracy varied based on the demographic groups that campaigns were aimed at, however. For example, desktop ads performed better than mobile ads when targeting broader age ranges.

Conversely, Nielsen said mobile campaigns were more effective in connecting with narrower audiences. For example, for campaigns aimed at people aged between 18 and 34, 63% of mobile ads reached their intended demographic target, compared with 53% on desktop.

Despite advances in targeting technology, Nielsen said it remains highly unlikely that digital ad campaigns could ever achieve a 100% on-target percentage, because of consumer behaviors such as misrepresenting their age or gender, or sharing digital devices with family and friends.
mobile_phones  smartphones  advertising  targeting  LBMA  Nielsen  consumer_behavior  misrepresentation  demographic_information 
february 2017
A Quiet Giant of Investing Weighs In on Trump
FEB. 6, 2017 | The New York Times | Andrew Ross Sorkin

In his letter, Mr. Klarman sets forth a countervailing view to the euphoria that has buoyed the stock market since Mr. Trump took office, describing “perilously high valuations.”

“Exuberant investors have focused on the potential benefits of stimulative tax cuts, while mostly ignoring the risks from America-first protectionism and the erection of new trade barriers,” he wrote.

“President Trump may be able to temporarily hold off the sweep of automation and globalization by cajoling companies to keep jobs at home, but bolstering inefficient and uncompetitive enterprises is likely to only temporarily stave off market forces,” he continued. “While they might be popular, the reason the U.S. long ago abandoned protectionist trade policies is because they not only don’t work, they actually leave society worse off.”

In particular, Mr. Klarman appears to believe that investors have become hypnotized by all the talk of pro-growth policies, without considering the full ramifications. He worries, for example, that Mr. Trump’s stimulus efforts “could prove quite inflationary, which would likely shock investors.”.....“The big picture for investors is this: Trump is high volatility, and investors generally abhor volatility and shun uncertainty,” he wrote. “Not only is Trump shockingly unpredictable, he’s apparently deliberately so; he says it’s part of his plan.”

While Mr. Klarman clearly is hoping for the best, he warned, “If things go wrong, we could find ourselves at the beginning of a lengthy decline in dollar hegemony, a rapid rise in interest rates and inflation, and global angst.”...In his recent letter, he explained for the first time his decision to say something publicly. “Despite my preference to stay out of the media,” he wrote, “I’ve taken the view that each of us can be bystanders, or we can be upstanders. I choose upstander.”....How Mr. Klarman wants investors to behave in the age of Trump remains an open question. But here’s a hint: At the top of his letter, he included three quotations. One was attributed to Thomas Jefferson: “In matters of style, swim with the current; in matters of principle, stand like a rock.”
Seth_Klarman  investors  hedge_funds  Donald_Trump  investing  ETFs  value_investing/investors  money_management  Andrew_Sorkin  countervailing  the_big_picture  nobystanders  Thomas_Jefferson  quotes  stylish  principles  uncompetitive 
february 2017
What Is Programmatic Advertising And Is It The Future?
Had to start out with what I thought was the obvious first question - wanted to get his personal definition. And then learn more about his company, what they are doing in the arena and how they are different. And also what he thinks marketers are doing wrong when it comes to advertising in the digital space.

SO: What is "programmatic advertising?"

GC: Programmatic Advertising is the automation of the buying and selling of desktop display, video, FBX, and mobile ads using real-time-bidding. Programmatic describes how online campaigns are booked, flighted, analyzed, and optimized via demand-side software (DSP) interfaces and algorithms.
programmatic  advertising  online_advertising 
february 2017
Breitbart Treats Kellogg to Its Smash-Mouth Style - The New Yorker
By Rob Walker   December 9, 2016

There are downsides to the efficiency of programmatic advertising. The reliance on machine learning and data crunching, rather than more subjective measures, can lead brands to display their wares in online environments they’d normally avoid—including fake-news sites, or highly partisan, provocative, and divisive ones—and they may not even be aware that it’s happening. It evidently took the involvement of human beings—a very small number of human beings, using social media—to make this clear to advertisers like Kellogg.
programmatic  Kellogg  Breitbart  advertising  online_advertising 
february 2017
Search and find – Medium
Follow

Kean Graham
We can upgrade your Google AdSense to
programmatic  advertising 
february 2017
Why Nobody Cares the President Is Lying - The New York Times
By CHARLES J. SYKESFEB. 4, 2017
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lying  Donald_Trump  right-wing  conservatism 
february 2017
The History the Slaveholders Wanted Us to Forget - The New York Times
By HENRY LOUIS GATES Jr.

Except for the relatively few African-Americans who saw through such racist fictions of Africa, drawn upon to devalue their humanity and justify their relegation to second-class citizenship — people such as Garvey, Henry Highland Garnet, Martin R. Delany, W.E.B. Du Bois (who would die a citizen of Ghana), Langston Hughes and Maya Angelou — far too many of us felt that “Africa” was something of an embarrassment. Richard Wright, the great novelist, published a book titled “Black Power” in 1954 about feeling that way.
historical_amnesia  historians  history  slavery  Africa  ignorance  slaveholders  Henry_Louis_Gates  African-Americans  second-class_citizenship  humanity  W.E.B._Du_Bois  Black_Power  erasures 
february 2017
Advertising: Facebook and Google build a duopoly
JUNE 23, 2016 | Financial Times | by Matthew Garrahan.

Google and Facebook compete in some areas such as digital video advertising but are present “across every part of the food chain”, according to one ad executive. This seismic shift to a digital and mobile ad landscape effectively controlled by two companies has wide repercussions for agencies, media buyers, publishers and the brands that want to sell more products.

Advertisers like the targeting they get with Facebook and the trove of data it has on its 1.6bn users, just as they like the efficiency of Google search. But they are worried about a concentration of market power in two companies that not only own the playing field but are able to set the rules of the game as well.

Facebook and Google “are hegemons” that could soon be taking campaigns away from television, says Brian Wieser, analyst with Pivotal Research. Paul Frampton, chief executive of Havas Media Group UK, says they are “black boxes” that have too much power. “They don’t give agencies or the brands access to their algorithms and the data being mined are for Google and Facebook — and not for the brand.”
advertising  advertising_agencies  Facebook  Google  Amazon  WPP  duopolies  media_buyers  dislocations  Mary_Meeker  seismic_shifts 
february 2017
How automation is shaking up the advertising industry - The Globe and Mail
SUSAN KRASHINSKY ROBERTSON AND SHANE DINGMAN
NEW YORK AND TORONTO — The Globe and Mail
Published Friday, Jun. 26, 2015
programmatic  advertising  automation  Susan_Krashinsky  online_advertising 
february 2017
Measuring the Effectiveness of Location-Based Advertising: A Randomized Field Experiment
Dominik Molitor1
Philipp Reichhart1
Martin Spann1
Anindya Ghose2
October 2013
This Version: March 2016
measurements  effectiveness  location_based_services  advertising  LBMA  randomness 
february 2017
Facebook Is Rolling Out a Handful of New Measurement Tools for Advertisers – Adweek
By Marty Swant|September 21, 2016

Third-party partnerships help track sales, lift and clicks
Facebook  LBMA  Tune  measurements  omnichannel  effectiveness  tools  partnerships 
february 2017
Buy, buy, baby
Sep 13th 2014 | The Economist

The advertising industry is going through something akin to the automation of the financial markets in the 1980s. This has helped to make advertising much more precise and personalised. Some advertising agencies and media companies have told their executives to read “Flash Boys” by Michael Lewis, a book about Wall Street’s high-speed traders, to make quite sure they get the message......Real-time bidding sounds high-tech but straightforward. When a consumer visits a website, his browser communicates with an ad server. The server sends a message to an exchange to provide data about that user, such as his IP address, his location and the website he is visiting. Potential ad buyers send their bids to the exchange. The highest one wins and an ad is served when the website loads. All this typically takes about 150 milliseconds.

In reality, though, the ad-tech ecosystem is stupefyingly complex. Luma Partners, an investment bank, has put together the "Lumascape", a bafflingly crowded organisational chart showing several hundred firms competing in this market. Sellers of advertising space often go through technology firms: a "supply-side platform" (SSP) helps publishers sell their inventory, and a "demand-side platform" (DSP) gives access to buyers. Many choose a data-management platform (DMP) to store and buy information about users.

Advanced behavioural targeting, which uses technology to reach specific users with the desired characteristics, helped advertisers increase their return on investment by 30-50%. One popular tactic is "retargeting", which allows advertisers to look for people who have visited their website before and show them an ad related to an item they were looking for but did not buy.
online_advertising  programmatic  advertising  advertising_agencies  LBMA  behavioural_targeting  location_based_services  automation  real-time  algorithms  ad-tech  auctions  ROI 
february 2017
John Wetton, Rocker With King Crimson and Asia, Dies at 67 - The New York Times
By DANIEL E. SLOTNIKJAN. 31, 2017
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'80s  music  obituaries 
february 2017
Life lessons: Looking back and taking stock - Western Alumni
Life lessons: Looking back and taking stock

by Paul Wells, BA'89

“Young people are educated in many ways,” he wrote, “but they are given relatively little help in understanding how a life develops, how careers and families evolve, what are the common mistakes and the common blessings of modern adulthood.”.....every few months when I sit down to write one of these columns, I do a little stock-taking. And a few times after a major screw-up or a minor triumph I’ve tried to do it in a more formal way. It’s true that just about every time I’ve bet everything on a new direction, it’s worked out better than if I’d stayed put. Once I bet everything and it worked out very badly. But even then, failure made a better life possible.

These are not lessons university teaches us well. Partly that’s because the young so rarely have any interest in learning them. I spent a lot more time at Western trying to figure out how to be successful than I did trying to figure out how to be happy. I figured 'happy' was in the gods’ hands, not mine. Almost everything that followed was accident.

To the extent we can learn how to live a good life, I think that so far, we learn it better from the arts and humanities than from science or even social science. Aristotle and Haydn have helped get me out of more fixes than cell biology did, although to be fair I was a lousy scientist. I’m quite sure it’ll never be possible to know, to three decimal places, how to live life well. Too many variables. But the question is still worth asking.

I’m with the Yale class of ’42. Change and risk have stood me in better stead than stasis and worry ever did. There may be a role for universities in teaching that much, at least.
advice  anti-résumé  chance  Colleges_&_Universities  David_Brooks  failure  happiness  lessons_learned  life_lessons  next_play  no_regrets  Paul_Wells  reflections  risk-taking  success  UWO 
february 2017
What Trump’s Changes Mean for the National Security Council - The New York Times
By DAVID E. SANGER and MARK LANDLER JAN. 30, 2017

The council is no place for political creatures, many have argued. It is the place where the nation’s deepest intelligence secrets, its fluctuating hierarchy of national interests and its jockeying-for-power cabinet members combine as policy differences are hashed out. It is the forum where decisions about war, from Vietnam to Iraq; drone strikes in Pakistan; and conflicts in cyberspace have unfolded over endless hours of meetings.

Of course, with stakes that large, it has always been about politics — from grand strategy to petty scorekeeping.....The formal instrument is the “principals committee,” made up of the president, the vice president and all those jockeying cabinet members. That is what Mr. Bannon joins, meaning he won the first week’s access-trust-influence sweepstakes. ...The NSC has a staff that numbers several hundred professionals — most borrowed from the State Department, the Pentagon, the intelligence agencies and other government agencies for two years or so....Much of the day-to-day decision-making is done by the “deputies committee,” where sub-cabinet officers, and their designees, sit in seemingly endless meetings in the Situation Room to debate out differences, create policy and push the hardest issues to the president and his top advisers. Intelligence officials often open those meetings, providing assessments of what is happening around the world. (They are not supposed to delve into policy suggestions, but it has happened.)
NSC  White_House  security_&_intelligence  U.S.foreign_policy  national_interests  Stephen_Bannon  Henry_Kissinger  Brent_Scowcroft  APNSA  David_Sanger 
january 2017
How to garner goodwill and respect | Financial Post
April 2, 2012 Financial Post | Rick Spence.

here are seven ways I believe you can woo your audience:

1. Recognize this opportunity is about understanding what the audience wants to hear. Always ask the meeting organizers about their expectations, and strive to meet them.
2. Be yourself.
3. Explain clearly and concisely what you do. ...Tell your story as simply as possible — who buys your products, and what problems do you solve for them?
4. Look for ways to tell your story visually. Use PowerPoint to show us your premises, your products and your customers. Don’t overdo it; people want to hear from you, not sit through a canned presentation.
5. Brag, but subtly.
6. Be memorable. At least, don’t be boring. Do something unexpected. Bring an unlikely prop, share a secret, describe how your company changed people’s lives, or ask the audience to take action. Leave people with one compelling idea or vision they’ll be talking about long after you sit down.
7. Practise, practise. Read your presentation repeatedly until you are so familiar with it you don’t need your notes.

If you finish early, ask for questions from the floor. Prepare an initial question or two of your own, in case your audience is shy (otherwise, this could be longest minute of your life). You might say, “What I’d be asking me right now is this — ” Follow it with a question that allows you to repeat your theme, with some new “inside” information that enhances it.

Be spontaneous, but never unprepared.
authenticity  clarity  Communicating_&_Connecting  concision  conferences  goodwill  know_your_audience  preparation  public_speaking  readiness  respect  RetailLoco_2017  Rick_Spence  speeches  spontaneity  storytelling  unprepared  visual_culture 
january 2017
Why McDonald’s All-Day Breakfast Was Years in the Making - Eater
by Tove Danovich Sep 25, 2015,

Most customers pay little attention to how the McGriddle is made, so to speak, but setting up a program like the all-day breakfast takes more than just marketing. In addition to years of talking about putting this plan into action, stores across the country spent months testing all-day breakfast and straightening out any flaws. Even once a plan was implemented, it was up to more than 3,000 owner-operators spread throughout the nation to upgrade and reorganize their kitchens for the menu change.
all-day  breakfasts  McDonald's  fast-food  QSR  operations  franchising 
january 2017
When the Feds Went After the Hedge-Fund Legend Steven A. Cohen - The New Yorker
ANUARY 16, 2017 ISSUE
WHEN THE FEDS WENT AFTER THE HEDGE-FUND LEGEND STEVEN A. COHEN
Inside the government’s nearly ten-year battle against one of the most powerful men on Wall Street.
By Sheelah Kolhatkar
Wall_Street  Preet_Bharara  insider_trading  hedge_funds  SAC_Capital  Steven_Cohen  white-collar_crime  nonpublic  Sheelah_Kolhatkar 
january 2017
How Ikea seduces us - The Globe and Mail
How Ikea seduces us
MARINA STRAUSS
The Globe and Mail
Published Thursday, May 27, 2010
disposability  Ikea  Marina_Strauss 
january 2017
Transitioning Pro-Bono Service to Paid Accounts
(1) Doing so would be contrary to any consultant’s positioning. If consultants choose to give away advice, it should be because they truly care about the cause. Doing so with the expectation that it could be turned profitable would be disingenuous. (2) When your primary deliverable is incorporeal (advice, strategy, direction, etc.), getting a client to start paying for that kind of service after they’ve already been receiving it for free is very, very difficult- even if they say they are willing.
pro-bono  management_consulting  advice  strategy  disingenuous 
january 2017
Mapping Where Torontonians Bike and Run
FEBRUARY 2, 2015 | Torontoist | BY DAVID HAINS

Developers map out the world's most popular spots for walking, jogging, and cycling—and reveal where in this city Torontonians like, and don't like, to get outside and get active.

....the maps show pieces of a larger story. The most popular trails might seem simply like fun places for a run or merely the result of individual choices, but they’re part of a larger context that governs how the city works—how the built and natural environment, a community’s land-use mix, housing affordability, community health options, and other factors affect the way we relate to and use different parts of the city.
affordable_housing  cardiovascular  community_health  correlations  cycling  diabetes  green_spaces  health_outcomes  healthy_lifestyles  land_uses  mapping  neighbourhoods  parks  public_policy  ravines  running  Toronto  self-selection 
january 2017
Why Succeeding Against the Odds Can Make You Sick - The New York Times
By JAMES HAMBLINJAN. 27, 2017
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sickness  race  racism 
january 2017
The Politics of Cowardice - The New York Times
David Brooks JAN. 27, 2017

Trump has changed the way the Republican Party sees the world. Republicans used to have a basic faith in the dynamism and openness of the free market. Now the party fears openness and competition.

In the summer of 2015, according to a Pew Research Center poll, Republicans said free trade deals had been good for the country by 51 to 39 percent. By the summer of 2016, Republicans said those deals had been bad for America by 61 percent to 32 percent.

It’s not that the deals had changed, or reality. It was that Donald Trump became the Republican nominee and his dark fearfulness became the party’s dark fearfulness. In this case fear is not a reaction to the world. It is a way of seeing the world. It propels your reactions to the world.
cowardice  David_Brooks  Donald_Trump  openness  Ronald_Reagan  '80s  GOP  FDR  optimism  free_markets  fear  threat_perception 
january 2017
Why Starbucks Might Be Innovating Too Fast - Barron's
By Alex Eule Jan. 26, 2017

Big Picture: Starbucks is seeing rapid success with its mobile ordering system, but it might be coming at the expense of in-store service.......The company now has so many customers placing advance orders via smartphones that some of its stores are having trouble keeping up.... “mobile order and pay” made up 7% of U.S. transactions in the latest quarter, up from just 3% a year ago.

But, it turns out, the existing stores haven’t been set up to handle the changing consumer behavior.

(From personal experience, I’ve noticed that Manhattan Starbucks counters are often over-filled with advance orders and those customers walk in and out, while the wait for in-store service is now longer than before.)

Starbucks president and chief operating officer Kevin Johnson, who’s set to become CEO in April, told investors that smartphone order volume has “created a new operational challenge...significant congestion at the handoff point. This congestion resulted in some number of customers who either entered the store or considered visiting a Starbucks store, and then did not complete a transaction.”
innovation  Starbucks  congestion  handoffs  in-store  order_management_system  mobile_applications  smartphones  consumer_behavior  operations  wait_times  brands  large_companies  shortcomings  revenge_effects  the_big_picture 
january 2017
How to Save CNN From Itself - The New York Times
By JESSICA YELLIN JAN. 26, 2017

in the past 20 months CNN’s management has let down its viewers and its journalists by sidelining the issues and real reporting in favor of pundits, prognostication and substance-free but entertaining TV “moments.”

Still, I believe the network can again play an essential role. At its best, CNN is a journalistic enterprise with unparalleled reach and resources, connecting its viewers with people and conflicts half a mile or half a world away.

That’s why I believe that as a condition of Time Warner’s bid to merge with AT&T, CNN should be sold to a new independent entity. This sale would also include CNN international, Headline News and its digital and related properties. Though AT&T has dismissed talk of a sale, one could be compelled by regulators. A consortium of concerned Americans — philanthropists, foundations, small-dollar donors — could fund a trust to operate an independent CNN dedicated to news in the public interest. Subscription fees from cable and other service providers, along with ad revenue, would allow the network to support itself.
Time_Warner  CNN  mergers_&_acquisitions  pundits  journalism  Ted_Turner  AT&T 
january 2017
Why wealthy families lose their fortunes in three generations - The Globe and Mail
AUGUSTA DWYER
Special to The Globe and Mail
Published Thursday, Jan. 26, 2017

Among the causes of the phenomenon are taxes, inflation, bad investment decisions and the natural dilution of assets as they are shared among generations of heirs.

Yet among the most compelling causes are younger family members who are ill-prepared or unwilling to shoulder the responsibility of wealth stewardship. They have grown up with plenty of money and are a step or two removed from the work ethic and drive of the people who made it for them.

“There is a risk of entitlement that comes to the fore, and that is where things tend to go off the rails,” says Thane Stenner, director of wealth management at Vancouver-based StennerZohny Investment Partners, part of Richardson GMP.

The key to overcoming that, he adds, is communication, which means “family discussions, family meetings, and trying to be very proactively engaging with the next generation, rather than reactive.

“Successful families are basically talking a lot to them about what the previous generation has done and engaging them by asking about their own dreams and aspirations. And really helping to enlighten them, or get them excited about their own future and how the family can help fund that future, but in a very responsible, business-like way.”

According to Mr. McCullough, almost as much time and effort should be spent in preparing the heirs to receive the wealth as actually investing and managing it.

“That involves understanding what your family’s set of values is,” he says.
attrition_rates  wealth_management  family  values  stewardship  generational_wealth  Tom_McCullough  Northwood  family-owned_businesses  family_business  Communicating_&_Connecting  mission_statements  entitlements  mindsets  family_office  work_ethic  heirs 
january 2017
McDonald’s Table Service: Fast Food Redefined - WSJ
By JULIE JARGON
Nov. 18, 2016

More McDonald’s Corp. customers across the U.S. will be able to choose table service inside restaurants, in an attempt to provide something beyond what a traditional fast-food chain offers.

It is part of an effort central to revive the burger giant’s sales, which have flagged in recent quarters. Franchisees and analysts have been wondering what else McDonald’s would do to drive interest in a brand that has been struggling to re-establish its relevancy in a market where consumers have more choices than ever to get food, including burgers.

The company that derives nearly 70% of its sales from the drive-through is hoping changes to the restaurants themselves will help lift sales, according to McDonald’s USA President Chris Kempczinski.....If the restaurants aren’t able to keep their stores clean and offer friendly service—two challenges that have plagued the company—having table service isn’t going to enhance the experience, said Darren Tristano, vice president at restaurant consulting firm Technomic Inc.

In addition to table service, the company is also installing free-standing kiosks inside the restaurants, which have proven successful in overseas markets including the U.K., France and Australia, according to the company, which said people tend to order more food when they don’t feel pressured to order at the counter. Customers can pay for their food at the kiosk and indicate whether they want table service.
McDonald's  fast-food  QSR  self-service  drive-throughs  kiosks  restaurants 
january 2017
Why Is the McFlurry Machine Down Again? - WSJ
By JULIE JARGON
Updated Jan. 19, 2017

Last year, downed ice cream machines became the most common service-related complaint among McDonald’s customers on Twitter, according to data analytics firm Quantifind, surpassing the previous year’s sore spot of poor employee attitudes.

McDonald’s doesn’t break out sales of specific menu items. Research firm Technomic Inc. says McFlurrys represent nearly 14% of McDonald’s dessert items that consumers 18 and older purchase for themselves. Other desserts include cookies, ice cream cones and fruit pies.

Joshua Reynolds, head of marketing and client consulting at Quantifind, estimates ice cream desserts make up 3% of the company’s U.S. sales. “I’m not sure how much of that $255 million is melting down the drain, but we know that’s what’s at risk,” he said.
breakdowns  downtime  McDonald's  Flybits  ice_cream  complaints  Quantifind  fast-food 
january 2017
Whole Foods to Close All Three Regional Kitchens - WSJ
By ANNIE GASPARRO and JESSE NEWMAN
Updated Jan. 25, 2017

Whole Foods Market Inc. is closing its three commercial kitchens, where it makes ready-to-eat meals for stores, including one location which received a regulatory warning about food safety violations last year.

The decision to outsource the food preparation, which was announced to employees last week, comes as Whole Foods works to cut costs by centralizing certain functions and reducing its workforce. ...to streamline operations, we have decided to leverage the expertise of our supplier network to create some of the high-quality prepared foods sold in our stores...Supermarkets across the sector are offering more prepared meals, with some even opening sushi restaurants and wine bars inside their stores. Fresh prepared foods generated $15 billion in sales in supermarkets in 2005, a figure that has nearly doubled to about $28 billion last year, according to Technomic, a food industry research firm.

But the explosion of prepared meals has brought new food-safety issues.
Whole_Foods  grocery  commercial_kitchens  supermarkets  food_safety  product_recalls  Outsourcing  prepared_meals  FDA  centralization  high-quality 
january 2017
Wilbur Ross brings art of restructuring to Team Trump
JANUARY 21, 2017 | FT| by: Philip Delves Broughton.

“When you start out with your adversary understanding that he or she is going to have to make concessions, that’s a pretty good background to begin.”

So all this stuff about tariffs and walls and protectionism turns out to be pure gamesmanship.......In his career as an investment banker at NM Rothschild and then running his own business, WL Ross & Co, he has shown repeatedly how he can dive into an industrial dung heap and emerge with a fistful of dollars and not a speck on his silk tie......... Working on his own account, Mr Ross’s most famous deal was his purchase of an ailing group of US steelmakers in 2002, shortly before President George W Bush imposed tariffs on imports of steel. Mr Ross used the protection to fix the operations, cut debt and draft new contracts with workers. He was able to take the company public in 2003 and sell it two years later to the Indian steel mogul Lakshmi Mittal.

He has pulled off similar tricks, mostly successfully in coal mining, textiles and banking, immersing himself again and again in new industries and the minutiae of the laws, trade rules and contracts that govern them.

As a student at Harvard Business School, Mr Ross was mentored by Georges Doriot, a pioneering advocate for venture capital, who said: “People who do well in life understand things that other people don’t understand.”
For bothering to understand things that most people don’t, Mr Ross deserves more credit than he gets. He is often easily dismissed as a vulture or someone who buys low and sells high. But what he has done is hard. The devil in restructuring is in the grinding detail of voluminous contracts and difficult, often highly emotional negotiations.
arcane_knowledge  bankruptcy  contracts  detail_oriented  dispassion  emotions  gamesmanship  Georges_Doriot  hard_work  imports  HBS  inequality_of_information  Lakshmi_Mittal  leverage  messiness  minutiae  moguls  negotiations  new_industries  Philip_Delves_Broughton  preparation  protectionism  restructurings  sophisticated  steel  tariffs  thinking_tragically  unsentimental  vulture_investing  Wilbur_Ross 
january 2017
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