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9 Things You Need To Know Before Dating An Outgoing Introvert | HuffPost
05/16/2017 10:25 am ET | Updated 3 days ago

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By Victoria Joslin
introverts  dating  relationships 
may 2017
Washington Post, Breaking News, Is Also Breaking New Ground - The New York Times
Common Sense
By JAMES B. STEWART MAY 19, 2017
Scoops — and high-quality journalism more generally — are integral to The Post’s business model at a time when the future of digital journalism seemed to be veering toward the lowest common denominator of exploding watermelons and stupid pet tricks.

“Investigative reporting is absolutely critical to our business model,” Mr. Baron told me. “We add value. We tell people what they didn’t already know. We hold government and powerful people and institutions accountable. This cannot happen without financial support. We’re at the point where the public realizes that and is willing to step up and support that work by buying subscriptions.”.........Mr. Huber noted that given the winner-take-all nature of the internet, the sources of scoops are gravitating toward just a few news outlets led by The Times and The Post. Sources (and people who want to “leak”) go to a publication with the most impact; opinion makers and influencers seek the publication with the most sources and scoops — hence the “network effect” so coveted in technology circles, and one well understood by Mr. Bezos.

When I asked Mr. Baron to name one thing that has driven the turnaround, his immediate answer was Mr. Bezos — and not because of his vast fortune.

“The most fundamental thing Jeff did was to change our strategy entirely,” Mr. Baron said. “We were a news organization that focused on the Washington region, so our vision was constrained. Jeff said from the start that wasn’t the right strategy. Our industry had suffered due to the internet, but the internet also brought gifts, and we should recognize that. It made distribution free, which gave us the opportunity to be a national and even international news organization, and we should recognize and take advantage of that.”.....“Today you have to be great at everything,” Mr. Hartman said. “You have to be great at technology. You have to be great at monetization. But one thing I think we’re proving is that if you are, great journalism can be profitable.”
journalism  investigative_journalism  WaPo  scoops  informants  winner-take-all  network_effects  sources  leaks  opinon_makers  digital_strategies  NYT  WSJ  Jeff_Bezos  subscriptions  paywalls  high-quality 
may 2017
Guaranteed to Raise a Smile
May 19, 2017 | WSJ | By Dominic Green

Pop music, psychedelia and nostalgia fused together in the album that defined the 1960s.

Universal Music Group, which owns Capitol Records, is marking the anniversary by issuing a multi-disc box set. There is also a box-full of books intended to reintroduce to us the act we’ve known for all these years. Brian Southall, a pop journalist when the band was together, handled publicity for EMI in the 1970s. Mike McInnerney designed the sleeve of the Who’s “Tommy.” Lavishly illustrated, their books reflect the synthesis between pop entertainment and thoughtful art that the Beatles were after......The 1960s formed the Beatles. The Beatles, with a little help from their friend, producer George Martin, made “Sgt. Pepper.” Now “Sgt. Pepper” defines the ’60s............“Pepper” endures not just because it caught the mood of the Summer of Love, or because it married pop music to the modernist techniques of the collage and the tape loop, or because it sounds quaintly futuristic. “Pepper” endures because it entered the past so quickly. On June 25, 1967, little more than three weeks after the album’s release, the Beatles joined Maria Callas and Picasso in the first live international satellite broadcast, for which they performed a new song, “All You Need Is Love.” The event initiated our age of simultaneous global media and announced the triumph of television. Like its Edwardian costumes and parping brass, “Pepper” was a colorized document from history—from a past in which music, not the visual image, could still change the world.
Beatles  '60s  anniversaries  music  iconic  cultural_touchpoints  pop_music  psychedelic  nostalgia  art  1967  kaleidoscopic 
may 2017
Outside Voices: Why Boards Need to Hire More Marketing Experts - WSJ
MediaLink’s Wenda Harris Millard argues more CMOs are needed as directors because board positions at Fortune 500 companies remain largely homogenous
May 19, 2017
CMOs  boards_&_directors_&_governance  Fortune_500  marketing 
may 2017
Seven Tips for Hiring Great Data-Analytics People - The Experts - WSJ
By TOM GIMBEL
May 16, 2017

1. Check references. References may sound basic, but they are crucial.
2. Actual examples. Regardless of their previous role, have them share an example of how they’ve analyzed data in the past. Ask for both the written and oral presentation. You want the person who actually did the heavy lifting, versus the person who only interpreted the information.
3. Take-home projects. Give your candidates a case study to take home and analyze.
4. On-the-spot tests. The best way to tell in real time whether or not a candidate is good at analyzing data is to present them with a data set during the interview and have them share how they would go about drawing conclusions.
5.Challenge the status quo. Talk to the candidate about a flawed process, or something you did that went wrong. Do they challenge or push back on why you went about it a certain way, or suggest a different way?
6. Storytelling. If when explaining a project they worked on, candidates claim to have reduced or increased key metrics, ask why they thought it was successful and what downstream impact it had on the business.
7. Insightfulness. Regardless of the project, whether it was an in-person analysis or report from a take-home assignment, have them walk through how they got to each step. What was their thought process, and are they able to expand on how it would impact business?
data_scientists  hiring  howto  tips  reference-checking  references  storytelling  insights 
may 2017
The Evolution of a Cybersecurity Firm - WSJ
By Cat Zakrzewski
May 16, 2017

......Certainly when someone is working with us today, they’re looking for us to deliver an outcome. They’re not necessarily looking for us to just provide them with a product and move on. That’s a big evolution in our model. We’re helping them manage cybersecurity risk.....It’s a big shift to go from a company that sold several products that each performed a separate security function to one that delivers an architecture designed to help customers drive more-holistic outcomes. In many cases, our customers are now asking us to help them manage and run our products for them so that they can get more value versus doing it themselves.......The problem we see in security is that often companies take the lack of attack on their company as meaning they have a good defense, and as a result do not place enough emphasis on the urgency of patching their systems to prevent future attacks.....[Cybersecurity has] gone from a back-office function to a boardroom-level issue. Now everyone in the C-suite of an organization has at least got some basic understanding of cybersecurity issues.

That’s bringing a whole level of visibility to it that we haven’t had in the past. Boards are worried about brand implications, they’re worried about intellectual property, they’re worried about business operations being interrupted, they’re worried about losing value. .....: I think the biggest mistake technical people can make is leading with the technology in both their explanation as well as in their remedies, leading with a one-size-fits-all problem. I think that’s when people get confused about what we’re trying to do. Then they think, well I can just go buy a widget and technical widgets should solve my technical cybersecurity problem. Cybersecurity is a systemic challenge. There are people issues......One key area is making sure that your partners and vendors are part of your extended, coordinated response, and that comes through clearly understanding what potential scenarios you face and then practicing what to do when an incident occurs.......Cybersecurity has a similar set of challenges, where you constantly are operating and have risks. People can be compromised, you have complex systems. You might make an acquisition where that firm had a breach and you’ve brought that into your organization. Cybersecurity is something you need to think about in a risk-based context and think about it holistically.
CEOs  McAfee  boards_&_directors_&_governance  cyber_security  cyberthreats  outcomes  risk-management  data_breaches  network_risk  threat_intelligence  one-size-fits-all  thinking_holistically  Michael_McDerment  C-suite 
may 2017
Trump and the problem with the new normal
Twenty years ago, Nasa scientists asked the sociologist Diane Vaughan to study the causes of the 1986 Challenger space shuttle disaster. Vaughan responded by developing a concept she called "the norma...
Gillian_Tett  Donald_Trump  NASA  deviance  '80s  normality  White_House  complacency  normalization  tipping_points  normalization_of_deviance  new_normal 
may 2017
Neil deGrasse Tyson on What Every Child Should Know About Science - WSJ
By Chris Kornelis
Updated May 18, 2017

The best advice I’ve ever received is: “It’s not good enough to be right. You also need to be effective.” Cyril deGrasse Tyson, 1928-2016.
profile  science  advice  Neil_deGrasse_Tyson  African-Americans  quotes  affirmations  effectiveness  scientifically_literate 
may 2017
The Wordsmith Shares His Craft - WSJ
By Edward Kosner
May 17, 2017

DO I MAKE MYSELF CLEAR?

By Harold Evans
Little, Brown, 408 pages, $27

Mr. Evans introduces a crisp curriculum of do’s and don’ts for the aspiring clear writer. He counsels the active voice over the passive, the parsimonious use of adjectives and the near banishment of adverbs. (Not as easily practiced as preached.) He also urges writers to cut fat, check their math, be specific, organize their material for clarity, accentuate the positive and never be boring.
active_voice  books  book_reviews  clarity  editors  parsimony  self-organization  words  wordsmiths  writing 
may 2017
20 Years On, Amazon and Jeff Bezos Prove Naysayers Wrong - The New York Times
Andrew Ross Sorkin
DEALBOOK MAY 15, 2017

Twenty years ago this week, Amazon.com went public........Here we are, 20 years later, and Mr. Bezos has an authentic, legitimate claim on having changed the way we live.

He has changed the way we shop. He has changed the way companies use computers, by moving much of their information and systems to cloud services. He’s even changed the way we interact with computers by voice: “Alexa!”......he has bought — and fixed — The Washington Post,.........Most executives are worried about the next quarter, but Mr. Bezos is worried about what will happen years from now. That is a competitive advantage that many chief executives could learn from.

“If everything you do needs to work on a three-year time horizon, then you’re competing against a lot of people,” Mr. Bezos told Wired in 2011. Here, he was expressing the view that some chief executives think in three-year cycles — a relatively generous assessment, given that most top executives don’t last many more years than that.

“But,” he continued, “if you’re willing to invest on a seven-year time horizon, you’re now competing against a fraction of those people, because very few companies are willing to do that.”....Is Mr. Bezos an easy boss? Hardly. He is unbelievably demanding. ......I’m supposed to hate Mr. Bezos. After all, he has pressured publishers, cut their margins and practically put old-school bookstores out of business. As if to rub it in, he’s now introducing bricks-and-mortar Amazon bookstores.

But to take that view would be to misunderstand what innovation looks like. It upends industries — witness the current carnage in the retail industry, which has been outmoded by Amazon and all the companies trying to copy it.

“Amazon is not happening to book selling,” Mr. Bezos explained, defending his role in a 2013 interview with Charlie Rose. “The future is happening to book selling.” And the future is now happening to retail stores and even supermarkets — Mr. Bezos’ next conquest. And the future is clearly happening to enterprise computing.
Andrew_Sorkin  Jeff_Bezos  Amazon  WaPo  newspapers  e-commerce  anniversaries  moguls  trailblazers  time_horizons  cloud_computing  Alexa  long-term  Warren_Buffett  innovation 
may 2017
What’s New in the Supermarket? A Lot, and Not All of It Good - The New York Times
By STEPHANIE STROMMAY 16, 2017
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grocery  innovation  supermarkets 
may 2017
After Leaving Google, Bill Maris Is Set to Open New Fund - The New York Times
By MICHAEL J. de la MERCED MAY 16, 2017
Mr. Maris announced on Tuesday that he has opened a new fund, Section 32, with about $150 million under management. It will invest in a variety of industries, from health care to agriculture technology.

“I left GV and knew that I wanted to start a fund of my own,” he said in a telephone interview. “My whole career has been about building things from scratch. I just wanted to do it at a different scale.”
venture_capital  vc  Bill_Maris  Google_Ventures 
may 2017
Sorry, we’re closed: The decline of established American retailing threatens jobs | The Economist
May 13th 2017 | New York

Therein lies the problem for America’s retailers. Not every mall or shop is dying. For now, store-occupancy rates are healthy. Nor have consumers stopped shopping. But they are spending money in new ways to the benefit of other businesses, such as restaurants, hotels and e-retailers, in particular Amazon. As a result, a giant established industry is descending into crisis.

Last year about 4,000 shops closed their doors for good. In 2017 more than twice that number may shut, says Credit Suisse, a bank. Consumer confidence is strong and unemployment is at its lowest level in a decade, yet S&P Global Ratings expects retailing defaults this year to surpass those in 2009 when the economy was in the depths of a recession.

The most important question is how far and how fast the industry might sink. This has implications not only for retailers and retail-property companies but also the financial firms that have given them money, from banks to life-insurance companies.
Amazon  decline  e-commerce  shopping_malls  retailers  dying  reboot  commercial_real_estate  store_closings 
may 2017
Tills and skills: How to prepare America’s retail workers for technological change | The Economist
May 12th 2017

America’s retail industry is huge: it employs 15.9m workers, who represent one in nine American jobs. It is also undergoing wrenching change, as e-commerce eats into sales. There is no more pressing test of society’s ability to cope with technology’s impact on work....For all the benefits that online retailing brings to consumers, it is causing immense pain to offline rivals. Last year 4,000 American stores closed; this year more than twice that number may shutter. Standard & Poor’s, a rating agency, expects retail defaults this year to outnumber those in 2009, at the height of the global recession. Some formats—discount stores, groceries, high-end malls—will continue to thrive. But many will shrink. The industry has shed 50,000 net jobs since January. Department stores may need to close more than 800 stores to reach the productivity levels of 2006. Many outlets are looking for ways to cut labour costs by embracing automation....The problems faced by America’s retailers are particularly acute because there are so many of them: shopping centres eat up five times more space per person than in Britain. But the threat posed by technology is familiar to workers elsewhere. In Japan, online sales menace small, specialty shops that account for roughly half of sales. The Eurasia Group, a consultancy, reckons that 192m retail jobs around the world are vulnerable to automation.....A 21st-century approach to careers advice would see employers across industries identify transferable skills: rather than thinking of e-commerce as a natural move for shop assistants, their ability to handle customers might make them more suitable for roles in health care, for example. Armed with such advice, people in at-risk industries such as retailing could be given learning accounts, topped up by government, that can be used to pay for new skills. Benefits could be made more portable, making it easier for workers to switch between full-time employment and the gig economy as circumstances change.
job_destruction  job_displacement  job_loss  e-commerce  store_closings  retailers  Standard_&_Poor’s  grocery  shopping_malls  department_stores  oversaturation  safety_nets  automation  technological_change  market_saturation  transferable_skills 
may 2017
The problem with zoos - The Globe and Mail
The Globe and Mail
Published Saturday, Jun. 04,
zoos 
may 2017
‘How Worried Should I Be?’ - The New York Times
By SUSAN CHIRAMAY 12, 2017

For scholars of democracy who have kept anxious watch over the tumultuous first months of this presidency, this week’s firing of James Comey set off a new round of alarm bells.

As President Trump attacked judges, intelligence agencies, the press, even the Congressional Budget Office — all potential independent constraints on presidential power — they constantly adjusted their scorecards, trying to sift the alarming from the merely noisy. But firing the official who heads an investigation into possible collusion between a presidential campaign and a foreign power crossed a line, they agreed......Few argue that the United States is in imminent danger of becoming an autocracy, a term much chewed over by pundits these days, including some conservative ones like David Frum...but in conversations over the past few months, scholars’ moods and assessments have soared and plummeted...... “Political scientists assume that politicians are ambitious and mainly motivated by a desire to win and retain office,” she said. “It’s not an uplifting image of our leaders but at least it makes them predictable, their actions explicable. An ever-improvising president, one who is utterly undisciplined, even to the point of undermining his own positions — [is worrisome].”....Political scientists are particularly concerned by the way congressional leaders immediately backed Mr. Trump [suggesting]
that partisan loyalty is still far more powerful than checks and balances,”....The scholars agree on what to watch for next: Who will be nominated as head of the F.B.I. and what will Republicans do?....“[Trump's] ability to undermine independent institutions is in the hands of the Republicans.”

Mr. Drutman said that if Republicans continue to reflexively back Mr. Trump, he would raise his “alarm-o-meter” to 8.
Donald_Trump  James_Comey  institutions  autocracies  authoritarianism  partisan_loyalty  democratic_institutions  warning_signs  checks_and_balances 
may 2017
What’s Next for Comey? Probably Not ‘a Normal Job’ - The New York Times
By MATTHEW GOLDSTEIN and ALEXANDRA STEVENSON MAY 13, 2017

Few can boast of a résumé like James B. Comey’s: top federal prosecutor, chief lawyer for both the world’s largest defense contractor and the world’s biggest hedge fund, and most recently director of the Federal Bureau of Investigation.

There’s just one problem: He was fired by President Trump, who has called him a “showboat” and a “grandstander.”

So where does Mr. Comey go next?...If Mr. Comey writes a book, he will not be the first F.B.I. director to do so. [Louis Freeh did 8 yrs ago]
......Mr. Comey might not be a candidate to lobby the current administration, his experience with financial crime and cybersecurity would appeal to most Wall Street firms and corporations, recruitment executives said.....“He is so high profile now that just a normal job is way beneath him,” said Jason Wachtel, a managing partner at JW Michaels & Company, a recruitment firm that specializes in placing lawyers at hedge funds and private equity firms. “Most of the hedge funds aren’t going to be big enough for him.”....A big law firm is another possibility.....Most law firms would see Mr. Comey as a big get, said Allan Ripp, a public relations consultant for law firms.

“From a sheer branding perspective, he would be a great hire — even if you bring him in as a counsel and not a partner,” .......In the near term, teaching is also an option. Mr. Comey briefly held a senior research post at Columbia Law School after leaving Bridgewater in January 2013.

Daniel C. Richman, a Columbia law professor and friend of Mr. Comey’s, who helped woo him to Columbia in 2013, said the former F.B.I. director “would be welcomed back, and he knows it.”
FBI  career_paths  executive_search  James_Comey  firings  financial_crimes  cyber_security 
may 2017
The Special Trouble With Special Ops - WSJ
By Ian F.W. Beckett
April 24, 2017

Mark Moyar’s “Oppose Any Foe: The Rise of America’s Special Operations Forces” demonstrates, traces the rise of various American special forces, which date from the formation of the Army First Ranger Battalion in 1942, now number 70,000 members. They have moved from being a secondary weapon to a primary weapon.......But, at best, unconventional units have offered tactical rather than strategic success. The one exception was the ousting of the Taliban from Afghanistan in support of the Northern Alliance immediately after 9/11; operations against al Qaeda in eastern Afghanistan were not as successful. There has been a litany of failures, including Operation Eagle Claw in Iran in April 1980 and Operation Gothic Serpent in Somalia in October 1993. Successive presidents, however, have fallen under the spell of special forces, although their support has often been qualified and quickly withdrawn, as was the case with President Bill Clinton after Somalia......

It is Mr. Moyar’s contention that the problem has been that few incumbents of the White House have understood special forces’ limitations. Special forces, he says, are best suited to counterinsurgency. He sees little likelihood of future opportunities to use special forces in the strategic role they played in Afghanistan in 2001, for example. Indeed, he argues that given the persistence of conventional threats, “the best solution at the present time would be to expand conventional forces rather than special operations forces.” New roles and missions may evolve, but special forces must be properly integrated into broader strategic enterprises. Successive presidents, he writes, have made decisions about unconventional units “based on superficial and romanticized views.”....Following a policy preference instituted by Donald Rumsfeld, Barack Obama embraced “surgical strikes” as a substitute for a real strategy, because “they enabled him to show the American public that he was combating terrorism forcefully and efficiently.”.....
books  book_reviews  SAS  security_&_intelligence  counterinsurgency  SEALs  covert_operations  U.S._Special_Forces  unconventional_warfare 
may 2017
Hackers Hit Dozens of Countries Exploiting Stolen N.S.A. Tool
MAY 12, 2017 | - The New York Times | By NICOLE PERLROTH and DAVID E. SANGER.

Hackers exploiting malicious software stolen from the National Security Agency executed damaging cyberattacks on Friday that hit dozens of countries worldwide, forcing Britain’s public health system to send patients away, freezing computers at Russia’s Interior Ministry and wreaking havoc on tens of thousands of computers elsewhere.....The attacks appeared to be the largest ransomware assault on record, but the scope of the damage was hard to measure. It was not clear if victims were paying the ransom, which began at about $300 to unlock individual computers, or even if those who did pay would regain access to their data.

Security experts described the attacks as the digital equivalent of a perfect storm. They began with a simple phishing email, similar to the one Russian hackers used in the attacks on the Democratic National Committee and other targets last year. They then quickly spread through victims’ systems using a hacking method that the N.S.A. is believed to have developed as part of its arsenal of cyberweapons. And finally they encrypted the computer systems of the victims, locking them out of critical data, including patient records in Britain.
tools  cyber_security  cyberweapons  cyberattacks  vulnerabilities  malware  Microsoft  ransomware  hackers  NSA  exploits  blackmail  David_Sanger 
may 2017
Improving your commuting time - The Globe and Mail
HARVEY SCHACHTER
Special to The Globe and Mail
Published Friday, May 12, 2017

five strategies to consider:

Use the time to shift your mindset: The commute affords you the opportunity to shift from personal to professional mode. Rituals can help: One study shows those who developed small routines on the way to work – such as checking the news on the train or having a look at the calendar for the day – felt more excited about the day ahead, more satisfied with their jobs and less stressed than individuals with no set routine. Buying a latte from the same coffee shop may even do the trick.

Prepare to be productive: ....when you spend some of your trip planning for the day or the week ahead you arrive at work better prepared and therefore happier, more energetic and more productive. “Simply ask yourself: What steps can I take today and during this week to accomplish my work and career goals? How can I be more productive?” they advise.

Find your “pockets of freedom”: Usually the commute feels out of control but they suggest focusing on what you can control. Think also about activities you enjoy – such as listening to music or podcasts or reading books – that you can fit into your trip. You might even use the time as a chance to learn a new skill – knitting or a foreign language, for example....“So try to tune out the negatives of commuting and concentrate on the opportunity to express yourself and recharge.”

Share the spirit: Commuting can be lonely if you drive by yourself or sit in an isolated cocoon on public transit. ...talking to strangers can improve well-being for commuters. So reach out to those around you and chat, or use social media. If you’re driving, call a friend on your speaker phone or try to find a commuting pal to travel with.

Reduce your commute: Consider living closer to your work. ... Carefully consider the downsides of a long commute before committing yourself to one,” they suggest.

More generally, think about your commute, its consequences on your life and the five changes they suggest.
commuting  Harvey_Schachter  recharging  personal_productivity  rituals  routines 
may 2017
Where Have All the Black-Owned Businesses Gone? - The Atlantic
BRIAN S. FELDMAN MAY 1, 2017

The last 30 years also have brought the wholesale collapse of black-owned independent businesses and financial institutions that once anchored black communities across the country. In 1985, 60 black-owned banks were providing financial services to their communities; today, just 23 remain. In 11 states where black-owned banks had headquarters in 1994, not a single one is still in business. Of the 50 black-owned insurance companies that operated during the 1980s, today just two remain.

Over the same period, tens of thousands of black-owned retail establishments and local service companies also have disappeared, having gone out of business or been acquired by larger companies. Reflecting these developments, working-age black Americans have become far less likely to be their own boss than in the 1990s. The per-capita number of black employers, for example, declined by some 12 percent just between 1997 and 2014.......the decline in entrepreneurship and business ownership among black Americans also is cause for concern. ...market concentration has played a role in suppressing opportunity and in displacing local economies. ...........The role of market concentration in inhibiting black-owned businesses is also troubling because of the critical role that such enterprises have played in organizing and financing the struggle for civil rights in America......The decline of black-owned independent businesses traces back to many causes, but a major one that has been little noted was the decline in the enforcement of anti-monopoly and fair-trade laws beginning in the late 1970s......Bob Dickerson, the CEO of the Birmingham Business Resource Center in Alabama, says, “Had our institutions and businesses been maintained, had that money been plowed back into our communities, it could have meant a world of difference.”

The role of market concentration in driving down the number of black-owned independent businesses becomes all the more concerning when one considers some mostly forgotten history. In principles, people, and tactics, the fight for black civil rights, going back to before the Civil War, was often deeply intertwined and aligned with America’s anti-monopoly traditions......The story of how the struggle for civil rights intertwined and intersected historically with the struggle against monopoly provides a lesson for the future. It suggests a need to recognize how political independence connects with economic independence in the struggle for social justice. Without freedom from domination in one sphere, there is no freedom in the other.
African-Americans  anticompetitive_behaviour  anti-monopoly  antitrust  black-owned  business  civil_rights  collapse-anxiety  corporate_concentration  economic_clout  economic_inclusion  economic_independence  enforcement  fair-trade  Jim_Crow  market_concentration  market_power  New_Deal  political_independence  segregation  societal_collapse 
may 2017
How Sephora Is Thriving Amid a Retail Crisis - The New York Times
By LAURA M. HOLSONMAY 11, 2017

Much has been written about the crisis in retail, with shoppers deserting department stores for e-tailers and fast fashion, if they shop at all. The beauty business, though, has not had the same fate. Prestige beauty sales in the United States rose 6 percent in the 12 months ending in February, tallying $15.9 billion, according to the market research company NPD Group. Makeup alone is up 11 percent, totaling $7.3 billion. But that industry, too, is in the midst of its own upheaval, driven in part by the success of stores such as Sephora, the No. 1 specialty beauty retailer in the world....Bloggers and YouTube stars, Instagram videos and virtual assistants are replacing department store sales clerks, whose customers now know as much as they do (or more) about mermaid eyes and ombré lips. Brand loyalty is out, replaced by Sephora’s try-more-buy-more ethos. Friends hold as much sway these days as trained experts....two out of five women between ages 18 and 54 wear five or more makeup products every day. “It defines the selfie-obsessed, image-driven culture of our time,” .... There are more voices. And we are trying to cut through the confusion,” in part by allowing customers to try before they buy.....“It is easy to kill time, play around with things and then spend more money than I should,” ...“I am experimenting a lot, trying to figure out what I like.” She doesn’t shop at department stores. “I don’t associate [Sephora] with makeup,”....In 2015, Sephora opened its Innovation Lab in a converted warehouse in San Francisco to experiment with ways to combine mobile apps and in-store shopping into a cohesive experience. As a result of their efforts, customers can have as little or as much personal contact they want in stores ...Now department stores are scrambling to follow suit.
Sephora  beauty  retailers  crisis  LVMH  Instagram  brands  millennials  social_media  digital_influencers  experimentation  time_sink  play  Macy’s  Bloomingdale’s  cosmetics  makeup  customer_experience  experiential_marketing  image-driven  self-absorbed  fast_fashion  in-store 
may 2017
Starting Over: How FreshBooks Reinvented Its Online Accounting Service On The Fly
Bo Burlingham ,   CONTRIBUTOR
I write about entrepreneurs and entrepreneurship

Opinions expressed by Forbes Contributors are their own.
This story appears in the May 16, 2017
Michael_McDerment  Freshbooks  SaaS  reinvention 
may 2017
You’re Probably Listening to Spotify Wrong. Be a Power User | WIRED
TIM MOYNIHAN GEAR DATE OF PUBLICATION: 02.19.16.
02.19.16
Spotify 
may 2017
Ontario airports must accommodate traffic growth, study says - The Globe and Mail
REG KEENAN - AIRLINE INDUSTRY REPORTER
The Globe and Mail
Published Tuesday, May 09, 2017
Ontario  airports  GTAA  congestion  user_growth 
may 2017
Prepare for a New Supercycle of Innovation - WSJ
By John Michaelson
May 9, 2017

Things are about to change. Consider information technology. Today’s enterprise IT systems are built on platforms dating from the 1970s to the 1990s. These systems are now horrendously expensive to operate, prone to catastrophic crashes, and unable to ensure data security. The cloud only made this worse by increasing complexity.

Corporate CEOs complain that they are unable to get the data they need. These rickety systems cannot easily accommodate data mining and artificial intelligence. Evidence of their deficiencies is seen daily. The New York Stock Exchange stops trading for hours. Yahoo acknowledges the compromise of one billion user accounts. Airline reservation systems go down repeatedly. The pain level for users is becoming intolerable.

Each decade for the past 60 years, we have seen a thousand-fold increase in world-wide processing power, bandwidth and storage. At the same time, costs have fallen by a factor of 10,000. Advances in these platforms, in themselves, do not produce innovation. But they facilitate the development and deployment of entirely new applications that take advantage of these advances. [jk: The Republican intellectual George F. Gilder taught us that we should husband resources that are scarce and costly, but can waste resources that are abundant and cheap] Amazing new applications are almost never predictable. They come from human creativity (jk: human ingenuity). That is one reason they almost never come from incumbent companies. But once barriers to innovation are lowered, new applications follow.
10x  artificial_intelligence  CEOs  creativity  cyber_security  data_mining  economic_downturn  flash_crashes  George_Gilder  Gilder's  Law  innovation  history  human_ingenuity  incumbents  IT  legacy_tech  Moore's_Law  NYSE 
may 2017
Yale to Build Tool Offering Real-Time Lessons on Financial Crises -
May 9, 2017 | WSJ | By Gabriel T. Rubin.

Yale University will launch an online platform to provide real-time support to policy makers dealing with financial crises, with the help of a $10 million gift from business leaders and philanthropists Bill Gates, Jeff Bezos, Bloomberg Philanthropies and the Peter G. Peterson Foundation.

The gift represents a major expansion of the Yale Program on Financial Stability, a degree-granting program in the university’s school of management that aims to train early- and midcareer financial regulators from around the globe.

The new resources will support a small staff of researchers, led by Professor Andrew Metrick, as they build a database of “lessons from hundreds of interventions from past crises,” the university said. The effort is the first of its kind, according to Yale, and reflects a need for more research on “wartime” situations, rather than the preventive sort of regulatory research done by central banks around the world. Central banks often avoid extensive crisis preparations out of reluctance to promote moral hazard, leaving policy makers to reinvent the wheel each time a new crisis arises.....Mr. Geithner, who serves as the chairman of the Program on Financial Stability, said that he and other policy makers would have been able to act faster and with greater confidence during the financial crisis with access to the tools that Mr. Metrick’s team will build.

“There were probably four or five periods when the crisis was escalating, the panic was spreading, sitting on the phone for 20 hours a day trying to figure out how to do things,” Mr. Geithner recalled. “And we hadn’t had to do some of those things since the Great Depression. That took us a lot of time, and that can be costly.”

The open online platform will include descriptions of specific interventions—for example, the use of a “bad bank” to hold distressed assets—and will detail what did and didn’t work well in each case.
Yale  Colleges_&_Universities  crisis  regulators  Walter_Bagehot  central_banks  real-time  databases  lessons_learned  policy_tools  Peter_Peterson  reinventing_the_wheel  policymakers  confidence  economic_downturn  decision_making  speed  the_Great_Depression  crisis_management  crisis_response  Tim_Geithner  moral_hazards  financial_crises 
may 2017
One Habit to Make You Happier Today - WSJ
By Elizabeth Bernstein
May 8, 2017
..... “QTL” (which stands for “Quality Time Left”) in difficult times, including when his wife was terminally ill last year, to remind himself not to waste time thinking about the negative and to focus on what makes him happy. Kathlene Carney, 55, a publicist in Point Richmond, Calif., begins repeating “good things always happen to me and good things always happen through me” as soon she feels a downward cycle of negative thinking coming on....How can you choose the best mantra for you? Not just any clichéd motto—“Just do it!”—will do.

Picture yourself older and wiser. Now think about what advice this evolved version of yourself would most want to give you right now to make your life better. Write it down. And distill it into single word, phrase or short sentence. “Make sure that it rings true for you, that it makes you feel good, empowered, reassured, and hopeful,”

Choose several. ‘Having one mantra can become monotonous or routine and it can lose its meaning,” But don’t have so many mantras that you have to struggle to recall them.

Keep it short. It needs to be easy to remember.

Make sure it is positive. But not unbelievable. “If it’s too positive, it can feel hokey—‘I’m good enough, smart enough and people like me,’” For example, telling yourself all is well when it clearly isn’t may not help. “Mantras that help build a healthy brain long-term are based in truth, logic and helpfulness,”

Trigger your mantra. Practice thinking about what’s bothering you and then saying your mantra. This will train your brain to call up the word or phrase as a habit when you are stressed.

Picture your new neural pathways.
affirmations  Elizabeth_Bernstein  habits  inspiration  mantras  mybestlife  negativity_bias  positive_thinking 
may 2017
Flood. Rinse. Repeat: The costly cycle that must end
May 07, 2017 | The Globe and Mail |GLENN MCGILLIVRAY, managing director, Institute for Catastrophic Loss Reduction

Once again, homes located alongside a Canadian river have flooded, affected homeowners are shocked, the local government is wringing its hands, the respective provincial government is ramping up to provide taxpayer-funded disaster assistance and the feds are deploying the Armed Forces.

In Canada, it is the plot of the movie Groundhog Day, or the definition of insanity attributed to Albert Einstein: Doing the same thing over and over again and expecting a different result.....First, a homeowner locates next to the river, oftentimes because of the view (meaning a personal choice is being made). Many of these homes are of high value.

Then the snow melts, the ice jams or the rain falls and the flood comes. Often, as is the case now, the rain is characterized by the media as being incredible, far outside the norm. Then a scientific or engineering analysis later shows that what happened was not very exceptional.

These events are not caused by the rain, they are caused by poor land-use decisions, among other public-policy foibles. This is what is meant when some say there are no such things as natural catastrophes, only man-made disasters.

Finally, the province steps in with disaster assistance then seeks reimbursement from the federal government through the Disaster Financial Assistance Arrangements. In any case, whether provincial or federal, taxpayers are left holding the bag.....So what is the root of the problem? Though complex problems have complex causes and complex solutions, one of the causes is that the party making the initial decision to allow construction (usually the local government) is not the party left holding the bag when the flood comes.

Just as homeowners have skin in the game through insurance deductibles and other measures, local governments need a financial disincentive to act in a risky manner. At present, municipalities face far more upside risk than downside risk when it comes to approving building in high-risk hazard zones. When the bailout comes from elsewhere, there is no incentive to make the right decision – the lure of an increased tax base and the desire not to anger local voters is all too great.

Reducing natural disaster losses in Canada means breaking the cycle – taking a link out of the chain of events that leads to losses.

Local governments eager for growth and the tax revenue that goes with it need to hold some significant portion of the downside risk in order to give them pause for thought.
floods  catastrophes  natural_calamities  design  insurance  public_policy  disasters  relief_recovery_reconstruction  sustainability  municipalities  skin_in_the_game  disincentives  Albert_Einstein  complex_problems  land_uses  moral_hazards  man-made  hazards  downside_risks 
may 2017
Learn How to Have a Learning Vacation
APRIL 28, 2017 | The New York Times | By SHIVANI VORA

FOLLOW YOUR PASSION The options for what you can learn on your vacation are limitless, and include cooking, photography, art history, farming or a sport such as diving or horseback riding. To get the most out of the trip, Mr. Spence advises choosing something you’re passionate about;

A LITTLE, OR A LOT? With whatever skill you intend to learn, figure out whether you want an immersion or only to occupy a portion of your trip.

CONSIDER YOUR BUDGET No matter the skill, you can learn it by taking a vacation in a wide range of price ranges, and having a clear idea of your budget will help you home in on the right trip.

DON’T FORGET THE CHILDREN
travel  vacations 
may 2017
What Kal Penn, Actor and Obama White House Alumnus, Loves About Toronto - The New York Times
By JOHN L. DORMAN MAY 3, 2017

Actor Kal Penn is the former associate director of the Office of Public Engagement under President Barack Obama, and currently stars as the press secretary Seth Wright on the ABC drama “Designated Survivor.”........Is there an area in Toronto that you gravitate toward?

There’s a neighborhood called Parkdale that I really like, which has an interesting Tibetan population. There’s a lot of great food, and I don’t mean fancy places where you dress up and go to dinner, but really great hole in the wall, authentic places to grab food. It’s a really nice neighborhood, in the West End of the city. Little Portugal is another great neighborhood, with really nice shops and restaurants........Talking to people whom we disagree with is more important now than it has been before, and I don’t mean just ranting on your Facebook wall. A conversation tends to go very differently when you’re having a beer with someone that you disagree with, compared to sending a nasty tweet to someone because you want to make yourself feel better.
actors  White_House  Toronto  public_discourse  Parkdale  disagreements  neighbourhoods  Queen_Street 
may 2017
How to Port Your Number and Switch to Public Mobile with an iPhone | iPhone in Canada Blog - Canada's #1 iPhone Resource
We have one more line with Fido (an old $56/2GB unlimited nationwide plan) and after calling the retentions department, they offered the following plans to make us stay:

$50/3GB: $5/250MB overages; unlimited nationwide calling, unlimited international MMS/SMS, voicemail (lite), caller ID, call waiting
$45/2GB: same as above
Overall, the porting experience was seamless and easy, but do set aside some time to get everything done. It was nice to be able to port over online and not have to visit a store or deal with a human (which isn’t possible with Public Mobile, so get used to their forums).
wireless  Canada  Canadian  Fido 
may 2017
Strategies for cutting how much you pay for your wireless plan - The Globe and Mail
CHRISTINE DOBBY - TELECOM REPORTER
The Globe and Mail
Published Sunday, Jul. 12, 2015

Planhub.ca
cost-cutting  wireless  Canadian  Canada 
may 2017
What Hospitality Means to Times Restaurant Critic Pete Wells - The New York Times
By PETE WELLSMAY 3, 2017

a guest is somebody who doesn’t pay: When a friend has you over for a beer, you’re a guest; when you eat in a restaurant and surrender your credit card at the end of the night, you are a customer.

It’s a distinction that restaurants do their best to blur. You even hear it when you’re standing in line at Chipotle or some place like it: “May I help the next guest, please?” But at Union Square Cafe, the choice of words has unique resonance........Mr. Meyer eventually settled on a word to sum up that something more and enshrined it in the name of his company, the Union Square Hospitality Group. From there, the notion of hospitality as the prime directive of restaurant service spread through the land, trickling down to your corner burrito chain.....
restaurants  hospitality  dining  Danny_Meyer  restauranteurs 
may 2017
The Data Behind Dining
FEB 7, 2017 | The Atlantic | BOURREE LAM.

Damian Mogavero, a dining-industry consultant, has analyzed the data behind thousands of restaurants—which dishes get ordered, which servers bring in the highest bills, and even what the weather’s like—and found that these metrics can help inform the decisions and practices of restaurateurs.....Mogavero recently wrote a book about analytics called The Underground Culinary Tour—which is also the name of an annual insider retreat he runs, in which he leads restaurateurs from around the nation to what he considers the most innovative restaurants in New York City, with 15 stops in 24 hours.....they really understood the business problem that I understood, as a frustrated restaurateur. There was not accessible information to make really important business decisions.

Lam: Why is it that the restaurant business tends to be more instinct-driven than data-driven?

Mogavero: It is so creative, and it really attracts innovative and creative people who really enjoy the art and the design of the guest experience. When I was a frustrated restaurateur, I would ask my chefs and managers simple questions, such as: Who are your top and bottom servers? Why did your food costs go up? Why did your labor costs go up? And they would give me blank stares, wrong answers, or make up stuff. The thing that really killed me is why so much time gets spent in administrative B.S.

They were frustrated artists in their own way, because all those questions I was posing were buried in a bunch of Excel spreadsheets. What I like to say is, nothing good ever happens at the back office. You can't make customers happy and you can’t cook great food there. That was the business problem that I saw. I assembled a chef, a sommelier, a restaurant manager, and three techies as the founding team of the company. The message was: We’re going to create software, so you can get back to what you love to do with a more profitable operation.......Mogavero: Because information is flowing so quickly, you’re likely to see trends from a big city go to a secondary city more often. But you’ll see regional trends come to the big city as well. It’s all part of this information flow that’s more transparent and faster. The secondary-market awakening is coupled with the fact that it’s really expensive for chefs to live in big cities, and we’re seeing many chefs leaving the big cities.
bullshitake  dining  data  books  restaurants  data_driven  New_York_City  innovation  restauranteurs  analytics  back-office  information_flows  secondary_markets 
may 2017
A Beauty Product’s Ads Exclude the Black Women Who Use It - The New York Times
By TRESSIE McMILLAN COTTOM MAY 3, 2017

..................When black women bought SheaMoisture products, they were rejecting powerful stereotypes about black women’s hair as inherently unattractive. Unwittingly or not, SheaMoisture was part of a political project for black women, helping us resist harmful biases about our natural hair that circumscribe our choices and well-being.

But Sundial Brands, the black-owned company that runs SheaMoisture, has its own goals. In 2015, it company sold a minority stakee to Bain Capital to finance an expansion. At the time, Richelieu Dennis, the chief executive of Sundial, said SheaMoisture would be pursuing the “new general market,” which he described as a “consolidation of cultures, ethnicities and demographics aligned with commonalities, needs and lifestyles.”

To believe it is possible to diversify SheaMoisture beyond its black natural-hair customer base, one must believe that black beauty is desirable for non-black consumers. For that to be true, black women would have to be an ideal beauty type in the global market that Mr. Dennis was going after. Mr. Dennis had one problem: reality..........SheaMoisture could not sell a product meant to make black women look “whiter,” such as a chemical treatment to straighten hair, without changing its entire product line. But it could concede to the demands of capital by marketing its existing products to non-black women. SheaMoisture eventually apologized, acknowledging the insult many black women felt. By prominently featuring white women in what had become a political project, the company had signaled to black women that we could never be enough.

Beauty is never just about preference. It is about economics and power and exclusion. Brands like SheaMoisture rely on certain ideas of what is beautiful to make money.
biases  blackness  personal_grooming  personal_care_products  women  African-Americans  hair  beauty  colorism  shadism  brands 
may 2017
Seth's Blog: Before you raise money (assets and expenses)
Here's the key thing you have to understand before you ask your mom or your friends or the local VC for an investment:

There's a huge difference between spending money on expenses and spending money to build an asset.

Ice at a picnic is an expense. Once it melts, it's gone. Your electric bill, rent--these are costs of doing business, and you should rarely if ever borrow money to pay them.

Assets, on the other hand, are things that sustain or grow in value, that you can use again and again, and that are ultimately worth more than they cost.

A college degree from the right institution is an asset. So is an earned list of 10,000 people who want to hear from you by email once a week. So is a reputation (which some people call a brand).

For entrepreneurs, then, the math is simple: any asset-building opportunity that will generate a long-term profit is worth considering and even worth borrowing money to acquire.

++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++

The reason for this money trap is that so many small-business owners confuse raising money for expenses with raising money to build an asset. This is worth understanding.

If you can say, "I will spend this money on X, and X will make Y happen, and Y will pay off handsomely," then a professional investor ought to be open to hearing that story.

But the things to spend money on are a significant real estate presence, machines, patents, a permanent, expensive brand. The entrepreneur who spends this money does it with enthusiasm, because she's buying things that are going to grow in value, fast.

This is the painting contractor who realizes that a high-powered industrial paint booth will make him the only guy in town who can do a certain kind of job. Or the fast food impresario who asserts that opening ten restaurants in one town in one year will give her the footprint to be more efficient and profitable.
funding  assets  Seth_Godin  expenses  financing 
may 2017
How Glencore AG became a giant in the global agriculture trade - The Globe and Mail
ERIC REGULY
ROTTERDAM, NETHERLANDS
THE GLOBE AND MAIL
LAST UPDATED: WEDNESDAY, MAY 03, 2017

Interested in acquisitions, Glencore AG has accumulated an extensive network of grain assets around the world, and has no plans of stopping
Eric_Reguly  Glencore  soybeans  CPPIB  Argentina  ADM  Bunge  Cargill  Louis_Dreyfus  oilseeds  Viterra  agriculture  growth  opportunities  Rotterdam  grains  logistics  storage  transportation  trading  agribusiness  supply_chains  Marc_Rich 
may 2017
Buying Competitive Advantage - YouTube
"clock speed"
privileged insights = unfair advantages
value-creation plans

Due diligence helps create privileged insight which needs to be tied to a value creation plan that helps you to achieve it.
competitive_advantage  KPMG  proprietary  insights  customer_insights  clock_speed  value_creation  due_diligence  unfair_advantages 
may 2017
Digital Transformation Requires Rethinking, VC Says - CIO Journal. - WSJ
By STEVEN NORTON
Apr 28, 2017

The education sector should focus on the arts and prepare students for jobs of the future that require softer, non-technical skills such as elder care, Mr. Wenger said. While important, he called a singular focus on science, technology, engineering and mathematics education “somewhat misguided” and advocated for an system that encourages excitement about knowledge, including the arts, instead of focusing solely on the job market. Doing so can equip people with the skills to think more broadly about how to build an economic and social system that limits inequality and encourages human participation, he said.
rethinking  education  digital_economy  digital_disruption  automation  artificial_intelligence  Union_Square_Ventures 
may 2017
China gifts luxury a reprieve
29 April/30 April 2017 | FT Weekend | by Harriet Agnew and Tom Hancock

Chinese consumers, the drivers of global luxury for more than a decade, once travelled overseas to the European fashion capitals of Paris, London and Milan to take advantage of lower prices. Now they are increasingly inclined to spend at home. Last year Chinese consumers made two-thirds of their personal luxury goods purchases domestically, compared with roughly a third in 2013, according to the Boston Consulting Group.
.............In an era of lower growth, brands are trying to adapt to changing consumer demands and the disruption of digital while keeping the creative process at the heart of it. “Creativity and audacity is what allows you to elicit desire [and therefore sales] over the long run, telling a story that people want to discover, chapter after chapter,” says François-Henri Pinault, chairman and chief executive of Kering.
......Yet brands can no longer rely on opening lots of new stores to fuel growth. Instead they have to keep costs down, revamp their existing stores to make them more profitable, and seek new customers through avenues like digital.

“The business model of luxury has completely changed,” says Erwan Rambourg, global co-head of consumer and retail at HSBC in New York. “Either brands understand that and make the changes themselves, or they don’t and they leave themselves open to activism or M&A.”
.......Compared with other consumer brands, luxury has been late to the digital party. Phoebe Philo, the then creative director at fashion house Céline, told Vogue in 2013 that “the chicest thing is when you don’t exist on Google”. But that view now looks unsustainable.

Six out of 10 sales are digitally influenced, says BCG, which estimates that online commerce will grow from 7 per cent of the global personal luxury market today to 12 per cent by 2020.

Within digital, the holy grail is so-called omnichannel — the ability to offer a seamless experience to customers that blends digital and bricks-and-mortar stores, and includes initiatives like click-and-collect. “Blending the physical and the digital is the future of the online flagship stores,” says Federico Marchetti, chief executive of the YOOX Net-a-Porter Group.

The emphasis is on the customer experience. Net-a-Porter is launching a same-day delivery service in September for its top clients in London called, “You try, we wait.” Customers will be able to try on their online order at home or in the office while the delivery van waits outside.
......As e-commerce gathers steam and groups collect more and more data on their clients, the next stage is machine learning and artificial intelligence, believes Mr Marchetti. In this vision of the future algorithms will act as virtual shopping assistants, suggesting items that the customer might like, “enabling us to speak to each customer on an individual basis rather than to the whole customer base”, he says.

Luxury brands are also increasingly using blogs, online “influencers” and social media platforms such as Instagram to generate visibility and lure potential buyers.

All of this is happening at a time when the definition of what constitutes luxury is expanding beyond physical possessions to include experiences both as a competitor to, and opportunity for, the traditional houses.

“Luxury brands are now competing with the plastic surgeon and the luxury travel agent,” says Mr Rambourg. “For a similar price you can have a Louis Vuitton handbag, a facelift or a trip to the Maldives.”
....“Our pulse is the Chinese customer,” says LVMH’s Mr Guiony: “It made the sector worse a couple of years ago and it has made it better now. We have to be aware of that. Trees don’t grow to the sky.”
/
luxury  brands  China  Chinese  China_rising  consumers  digital_disruption  e-commerce  travel_agents  BCG  growth  LVMH  watches  noughties  Yoox  customer_experience  WeChat  Burberry  digital_influencers  creativity  audacity  storytelling  omnichannel  artificial_intelligence  machine_learning  virtual_assistants  same-day 
may 2017
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