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Toronto restaurant ordered to pay $10,000 after asking black customers to prepay for their meal - The Globe and Mail
DAKSHANA BASCARAMURTY
PUBLISHED 12 HOURS AGO

Mr. Wickham said the experience has made him question the popular narrative that big cities like Toronto are harmonious multicultural havens.

“I feel a lot of Canadians feel like because they don’t say the N-word or they have that black colleague or they like to eat Jamaican food and know about roti and doubles” they think they’re not racist, Mr. Wickham said.

In a 2017 consultation on racial profiling conducted by the Ontario Human Rights Commission, the retail/private business sector was the one in which black respondents reported encountering the highest level of discrimination. About 47 per cent said they’d been profiled in this setting, a rate much higher than all other groups surveyed.

Roger Love, a lawyer with the Human Rights Legal Support Centre who represented Mr. Wickham, said it’s a common misconception that anti-black racism occurs only at the hands of white individuals and that many cases his office handles deal with racialized perpetrators......Toronto lawyer Selwyn Pieters said he doesn’t know how prevalent experiences like Mr. Wickham’s are because though it is widely reported that black people experience profiling, they face many barriers in seeking justice: the human-rights complaints process can be difficult to navigate, lawyers are expensive and cases that deal with race are often very difficult to establish and prove, he said.......“Before the camera on the cellphone became a popular thing...all we had was our word,” he said. “And us calling out how we were treated, our word wasn’t good enough, right?”
restaurants  Toronto  Chinatown  racism  OHRC  racial_discrimination  racial_profiling  prepaid 
april 2018
Al Gore: sustainability is history’s biggest investment opportunity
Owen Walker YESTERDAY

Fourteen years ago Mr Gore co-founded a sustainability-focused fund management company with David Blood, former head of Goldman Sachs Asset Management. Rather than the colourful “Blood & Gore Partners”, they named the business Generation Investment Management. The London-based group has since attracted $19bn in assets, managing money for institutional investors and affluent individuals, mainly in North America and Europe....Mr Gore has just given a presentation to UBS wealth advisers at the bank’s annual investment get-together. Unlike most of the PowerPoint-packed presentations, Mr Gore’s delivery is a glitzy affair, with dramatic theme music and video clips of crashing glaciers. His talk receives a standing ovation and he is mobbed for more selfies at the end....Generation lists large public sector investors among its clients, such as Calstrs, the $223bn Californian teachers’ pension plan, the $192bn New York State pension plan and the UK’s Environment Agency retirement fund. It also manages money for wealthy individuals but has stopped short of opening to retail investors. Almost all its assets are run in equity mandates, yet $1bn is invested in private equity
Albert_Gore  sustainability  asset_management  institutional_investors  investors  green  climate_change 
april 2018
Opinion | Michael Hayden: The End of Intelligence - The New York Times
By Michael V. Hayden

Mr. Hayden is a former director of the Central Intelligence Agency and the National Security Agency.

April 28, 2018
Donald_Trump  Michael_Hayden  security_&_intelligence 
april 2018
Starbucks Is Not the Next Selma - WSJ
By Robert L. Woodson Sr.
April 29, 2018

What do the Starbucks protesters want? Who are the intended beneficiaries of their goals? Who are the losers?...It’s easy to see who benefits from this kind of response: The consultants who devise and conduct sensitivity-training sessions. The civil-rights organizations that will get money from donors anxious to relieve their white guilt. ..... Although many of the young protesters may authentically believe they are rallying for racial justice, they are in fact playing the role of the decoy. They are a useful diversion for those who reap the profits of the race-grievance industry. Similarly, the continuing mantra of racism serves as a shield for black officials in cities where black neighborhoods have declined and decayed.
African-Americans  civil_rights  grievances  Philadelphia  Starbucks  racial_sensitivity  white_guilt 
april 2018
Another great migration is under way: Black Americans are leaving big cities for the suburbs - The Globe and Mail
MARCUS GEE
CHICAGO
PUBLISHED APRIL 29, 2018

The dwindling of black Chicago is all the more poignant when set against the dramatic story of its rise. Over the course of the Great Migration, Chicago’s black population grew from just 44,000 to more than a million. At one point, writes Isabel Wilkerson in her 2010 history The Warmth of Other Suns, 10,000 people were arriving in the city every month, pouring off northbound trains onto Chicago railway platforms.

Chicago became a capital of black America, enjoying a cultural renaissance that rivalled Harlem’s in New York. Famous figures such as gospel singer Mahalia Jackson, boxer Joe Louis and poet Gwendolyn Brooks were among Chicago’s residents.
Chicago  Marcus_Gee  internal_migration  suburban  crime  black_flight  gentrification  the_South  African-Americans  Great_Migration  Isabel_Wilkerson 
april 2018
Probiotic Product Summary Chart - June 13 2017.docx (Microsoft Word)
Look for Yoplait's Yoptimal, Iogo, assorted kerfir brands (Kefir products had more helpful bacterial strains and often at the highest doses, but the strain mixes haven't been studied yet) . In a pinch, Danone's Danactive.

Avoid Danone's Activa and Astro's Biobest.

When buying probiotic foods or supplements, read labels. Look for the full probiotic name, which includes the genus, species and then the strain.

Next, look at the dose or number of live organisms per capsule or serving. Probiotic levels are typically given in CFUs, or colony-forming units. Different probiotics are effective at different levels. The suggested serving size or dose should be indicated.
probiotics  yogurt  charts 
april 2018
(8) Top Foods That Bloat You (Stomach and Face Bloating) - YouTube
Facial bloat and abdominal bloat.

Dehydration--we retain water in our face. We're dehydrated in the morning. Morning edema. ...body is trying to hold onto water.

Unopposed sodium. Salt is not the enemy. I.e. ionized salt that is unbalanced. Need potassium and magnesium to balance it out.....truffle salt, pink Himalayan salt, consume some cream of tartar. Add a pinch to water. 1 tsp of quality salt for every 3/4 -1 gall/water consumed.

Stomach bloat--something digestive/gastrointestinal. Don't digest, go into your colon and they ferment and create gases like H and methane. Don't eat raw broccoli and raw cabbage. Steam them even for a little bit of time. ......Besides steaming the veggies, starting fermenting your cruciferous vegetable.
dehydration  hydration  diets  fermentation  digestive_systems  bloating  flatulence  gastrointestinal 
april 2018
Lynching memorial leaves some quietly seething: 'Let sleeping dogs lie' | US news | The Guardian
++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++
Vergangenheitsbewältigung = coming to terms with the past — and it carries connotations of a painful history that citizens would rather not confront but that must be confronted in order not to be repeated.
Alabama  historical_amnesia  memorials  lynchings  terror  the_South  Vergangenheitsbewältigung 
april 2018
Adopt a movement-based approach for optimized workouts - The Globe and Mail
MAY 25, 2017 | SPECIAL TO THE GLOBE AND MAIL
PUBLISHED | PAUL LANDINI

the four most common movement patterns: 1. pushing (vertical and horizontal), 2. pulling (vertical and horizontal), 3. squatting (knee-dominant) and 4. hinging (hip-dominant). Master these movements and you'll be able to execute just about any exercise that comes your way.

(1) Pushing

Main muscles: Pectorals (chest), deltoids (shoulders), triceps (back of arms).

Best exercises: Push-ups; landmine press; one-arm kettlebell press.
(2) Pulling
Main muscles: Latissimus dorsi (mid back), rhomboids (upper back), biceps (front of arms).

Best exercises: Pull-ups; inverted row; face pull

(3) Squatting

Main muscles: Quads (front of legs), glutes (butt), hamstrings (back of legs).

Best exercises: Goblet squat; split squat; reverse lunge.

(4) Hinging

Main muscles: Hamstrings, glutes, spinal erectors (low back).

Best exercises: Deadlift; Romanian deadlift; kettlebell swing
back_exercises  calisthenics  compound_movements  deadlifts  exercise  face-pulls  fitness  functional_strength  glutes  movement-based  pull-ups  push-ups  shoulder_exercises  squats  strength_training 
april 2018
Confronting anxiety in the age of fear
Jo Ellison 16 HOURS AGO.

Fear is terribly boring. I suppose in modern jargon it could be called anxiety. But I prefer the old fashioned neurotic. I conjure fear from any source — electric kettles, exploding champagne corks, unattended bags . . . At night I consider unmentionable catastrophes and my preparedness to survive them. (Top tip: talking to a disaster relief engineer as to what to do in the event of Armageddon, she said to fill the bath tub. Safe potable water will be the key to one’s survival.)......Olivia Remes, an American PhD candidate at the University of Cambridge, is the glamorous face of anxiety research.....While Remes acknowledges that some degree of anxiety can make us more productive, because it equips us to meet deadlines and complete tasks, she says excessive worry will always be debilitating because it paralyses our progress. We stop going out. We limit our lives.

The first step to recovery, she says, is to “do it badly”. Doing whatever it is that frightens you, she argues, will “catapult” you to action and help you realise that your fear may not be as bad as you think. Whatever else, it will only get better with practice. Anxiety, she adds, is largely the byproduct of perfectionism, whereby people stop doing things because they hold their own personal standards too high....loosen the grip. Because only by letting go of the things over which you have no control can you gain control over the things that really matter — namely, your mental health.
anxiety  fear  sense_of_control  earthquakes  randomness  perfectionism  survival_techniques  letting_go  mental_health  what_really_matters 
april 2018
The Common Advice for Those With Thinning Bones Could Be All Wrong - WSJ
Bone building happens specifically at the areas of the bone you stress during your workout, says Pamela S. Hinton, associate professor of nutrition and exercise physiology, at the University of Missouri, in Columbia.

For this reason, a dead lift is one of the best exercises because it “uses big muscles around the hips and hamstrings,” causing the muscle to pull on the bone. It also recruits the muscles around the lumbar and thoracic spine to stabilize the body during the lift, says Polly de Mille, exercise physiologist at the Women’s Sports Medicine Center at the Hospital for Special Surgery in New York. Proper form is critical to safety, she adds.
aging  longevity  strength_training  intensity  fitness  exercise  high-intensity  trauma  overcompensation  deadlifts  osteoporosis  bone_density  high-impact 
april 2018
Running Is the Worst Way to Get Fit - Tonic
Nick English

Nov 17 2016

Running is a crappy way to lose fat and an inferior way to boost cardiovascular health, but it's somehow become the most popular exercise on Earth after walking.....It's an incredibly inefficient way to build strength. And as we all know, a strong body is the number one way to prevent injuries, increase metabolism, burn fat, and stay mobile and functional in old age. Folks "do cardio" because they want to burn off their bellies. And running is a bad pick.

"That's usually what the mentality is, that it's a way to get leaner and lose weight, but doing other things outside of running will probably have a better effect at catalyzing that result," he says. Boyce's fat-loss prescription, like that of practically any trainer worth their salt, is compound strength exercises. That means multi-joint movements like the squat, deadlift, overhead press, chin-ups, pull-ups, and push-ups......Studies have consistently shown that weight training and sprinting are more effective than running at targeting belly fat and creating a good hormonal environment for fat loss, meaning better insulin sensitivity, less of the stress hormone cortisol, and more growth hormone and testosterone. ....exercising the heart at a higher intensity is a better way to get the job done. Studies have shown that shorter sessions of anaerobic training, like fast-paced resistance training or sprints, are just as good for heart health as long, drawn-out runs and better at maintaining muscle and increasing aerobic fitness (or VO2 max, if you want to be specific). ...."In many ways, sprinting is safer than running,"....you're going to have more of a fat loss effect from sprinting for the same reasons you get it from weights: You're doing things that require strength, explosiveness, exertion, and intensity, so your muscles are going to have to work a little bit harder, they're going to burn more calories, and you're going to be more metabolic after you finish your workout as well.".....
aerobic  cardiovascular  compound_movements  deadlifts  exercise  fast-paced  fat-burning  fitness  functional_strength  howto  interval_training  high-impact  high-intensity  injury_prevention  metabolic_rate  military_press  pull-ups  running  squats  strength_training 
april 2018
Welcome to the New Convenience Store - WSJ
By Jane Black
April 25, 2018

“People will come in and say this isn’t a convenience store,” said Lisa Sedlar, the founder of Green Zebra Grocery. “And I say, ‘Of course it is.’ We are redefining what it means to be a convenience store in America.”

Several trends are driving change, according to research firm the Hartman Group. In the era of fast-casual restaurants, customers of all ages aren’t willing to sacrifice good taste or a pleasant experience for fast and easy. And despite claims of being time-starved, they don’t seem interested in a one-stop shop. Primary shoppers report making more frequent trips to buy food at a range of outlets, from traditional grocery stores to specialty shops: The average number of grocery trips made per purchaser, per month jumped nearly 30% between 2014 and 2017. Finally, snacks—the raison d’être of convenience stores—are supplanting meals. Of all “eating occasions,” 50% are now snacks.
convenience_stores  fast-casual  grocery  one-stop_shop  retailers  small_spaces  snacks  time-strapped  trends  upstarts  urban 
april 2018
Opinion | At This Memorial, the Monuments Bleed - The New York Times
By Jesse Wegman

Mr. Wegman is a member of the editorial board.

April 25, 2018
the_South  slavery  lynchings  memorials  racial_violence 
april 2018
The digital economy is disrupting our old models
Diane Coyle 14 HOURS AGO

To put it in economic jargon, we are in the territory of externalities and public goods. Information once shared cannot be unshared.

The digital economy is one of externalities and public goods to a far greater degree than in the past. We have not begun to get to grips with how to analyse it, still less to develop policies for the common good. There are two questions at the heart of the challenge: what norms and laws about property rights over intangibles such as data or ideas or algorithms are going to be needed? And what will the best balance between collective and individual actions be or, to put it another way, between government and market?
mydata  personal_data  digital_economy  Facebook  externalities  knowledge_economy  public_goods  algorithms  data  ideas  intangibles  property_rights  protocols 
april 2018
Dump the PowerPoints and do data properly — or lose money
APRIL 15, 2018 | FT| Alan Smith.

So what can data analysts in organisations do to get their messages heard?

Board members and senior managers certainly need to consider new ways of thinking that give primacy to data. But reasoning with data requires what psychologist Daniel Kahneman describes as “System 2 thinking” — the rational, reasoning self — and a move away from the “gut intuition” of System 1. That’s not an easy culture change to achieve overnight.

Freelance consultant, author and data visualisation expert Andy Kirk believes there is a duty of care on both analysts and their audiences to develop skills, particularly in relation to how data is communicated through an organisation.......many senior managers “neither have the visual literacy nor the confidence to be exposed to [data presentations] they don't understand — and they just don't like change”. Mr Kirk describes it as a kind of “Stockholm syndrome” in data form — “I’ve always had my report designed like this, I don't want anything different”.......data analysts need to nurture their communication skills, taking a responsibility for encouraging change and critical thinking, not just being “the data people”. Acting as agents of change, they need to be effective marketers of their skills and sensitive educators that show a nuanced appreciation of the needs of the business. Organisations that bind data to the business model — and data literacy to the board — will inevitably stand a better chance of achieving long-term change.....The truth is that data in the boardroom enjoys a patchy reputation, typified by dull, overlong PowerPoint presentations. A cynic might suggest that even the most recent addition to boardroom structures — the chief data officer — is used by many boards simply as a device to prevent other members needing to worry about the numbers.

Here are 3 techniques that can be used to encourage progressive change in the boardroom.
(1) Use KPIs that are meaningful and appropriate for answering the central questions about the business and the market it operates in. Try to eliminate “inertia metrics” — i.e. “we report this because we always do”.

(2) Rework boardroom materials so that they encourage board members to read data, preferably in advance of meetings, rather than glance at it during one. This might mean transforming the dreaded PowerPoint deck into something a little more journalistic, a move that will help engage “System 2” thinking.

(3) Above all, be aware of unconscious bias in the boardroom and focus on debunking it. Most of us are poor intuitive statisticians with biases that lurk deep in our “System 1” view of the world. There is insight, value and memorability in the surprise that comes with highlighting our own ignorance — so use data to shine a light on surprising trends, not to simply reinforce that which is already known.
absenteeism  boards_&_directors_&_governance  change  change_agents  Communicating_&_Connecting  Daniel_Kahneman  data  data_driven  gut_feelings  infographics  insights  KPIs  PowerPoint  psychologists  storytelling  surprises  visualization 
april 2018
Norway’s oil wealth swamps innovation
John Gapper OCTOBER 19, 2016

"omstilling", is the name for Norway’s nascent shift to living without the energy industry that has brought it wealth and welfare for 45 years.

Why hurry, some wonder. Its 5.2m citizens are among the world’s comfiest, with gross domestic product per head of $75,000. Its oil-funded sovereign wealth fund, set up in 1990 to help it avoid “Dutch disease” — the syndrome of resource wealth driving up national currencies and weakening other sectors — is worth $880bn. Its oil and gas reserves should last for another half-century.

The trouble is that Norway is too comfortable. It takes a crisis to get most people to change their ways radically or for an economy to adjust the way that it works. Whatever you think of Brexit, it is one of those crises. At the moment, Norway has more official think-tanks and innovation incubators than entrepreneurship and disruption.....The oil fund is exemplary in many ways: by taking the wealth largely out of the hands of the government and directing it into overseas investment, Norway has avoided the worst of Dutch disease. But it adds to the sense of the country having a cushion against change: the fund’s very existence extends its deadline to reshape the economy.

The citizens are also cushioned......Norway remains hesitant about change.....Norway is a consensus-driven society that feels comfortable only with reform that has been carefully discussed and agreed....Elisabeth Stray Pedersen, a 29-year-old fashion designer who last year bought a factory opened in 1953 by the designer Unn Soiland Dale. She wants to revive its Lillunn brand and sell more of its Norwegian wool blankets and coats abroad.
Norway  Norwegian  oil_industry  Brexit  United_Kingdom  innovation  natural_resources  resource_curse  sovereign_wealth_funds  complacency  fashion  apparel  start_ups 
april 2018
3G Capital’s rigorous diet of cost cutting is weighing down Tim Hortons owner RBI, Kraft Heinz
APRIL 18, 2018 | The Globe and Mail | by IAN MCGUGAN.

Tough, cost-conscious management is a vital ingredient at any good company. But right now, shareholders in Restaurant Brands International Inc. and Kraft Heinz Co. should be asking whether a lean and mean operating style is hitting its limits when it comes to peddling doughnuts and ketchup.

In recent months, RBI, the parent of Tim Hortons, and Kraft Heinz, maker of your favourite burger condiment, have disappointed investors....... the 3G approach is beginning to show some flaws. Critics argue that managers who focus on streamlining existing operations can create a temporary bump in earnings, but have less time to spend on product development, corporate innovation and brand building. The danger, skeptics say, is that efficiency increases but sales and earnings per share don’t.

“We harbor serious doubts about the management team’s ability to generate sufficient product innovation to grow its collection of ‘retro’ brands in highly commoditized categories,” Robert Moskow of Credit Suisse wrote this week in a report that downgraded Kraft Heinz to “underperform” status.....But softer measures suggest the profits are coming at a cost. Consider a survey of 1,501 Canadian adults published this week by Angus Reid Institute. Thirty five per cent of respondents said their opinion of Tim Hortons had worsened in recent years. While Tim Hortons’ advertising campaigns have tirelessly promoted the chain’s deep roots in Canadian communities, the reality on the ground appears to be shifting.

At Kraft Heinz, signs of stress are also becoming apparent, according to Mr. Moskow. The company’s Oscar Mayer cold cuts and Kraft natural cheese brands are losing market share to private labels, while Canadian retailers recently reduced their inventories, he said.

Employees may not be all that happy, either. Mr. Moskow said industry sources have expressed concern about growing turnover rates among Kraft Heinz staffers.
3G_Capital  Tim_Hortons  cost-cutting  product_development  innovation  Kraft_Heinz 
april 2018
Amazon Prime Has More Than 100 Million Members - WSJ
By Austen Hufford and Georgia Wells
Updated April 18, 2018
Amazon_Prime  Jeff_Bezos  Amazon 
april 2018
The challenger - Technopolitics
Mar 15th 2018 | HONG KONG AND SAN FRANCISCO.

Technology is rarely, in and of itself, ideological. But technosystems have an ideological side—witness the struggles of open-source advocates against proprietary-software developers—and can be used to ideological ends. The global spread of a technosystem conceived in, and to an unknown extent controlled by, an undemocratic, authoritarian regime could have unprecedented historical significance.

China is not just in a better position to challenge America’s hegemony than it used to be. It is a good time to do so, too. It is not only the roll out of 5G. AI has started to move from the tech world to conventional businesses; quantum computing seems about to become useful. All this creates openings for newcomers, especially if backed by a state that takes a long view and doesn’t need a quick return......To focus on individual companies, though, is to miss the point. China’s leaders want to bind firms, customers and government agencies together with “robust governance”, in the words of Samm Sacks of the Centre for Strategic and International Studies (CSIS), a think-tank in Washington, DC. They want to build a technosystem in which incentives to use other people’s technology are minimised. These are, as it happens, the same goals as those of the companies which run America’s large technology platforms, whether they are operating systems, social networks or computing clouds.

Gardening tools

A cardinal rule of managing such walled gardens is to control access. Developers of apps for Apple’s iPhone have to go through a lengthy application process with an uncertain outcome; for example, in an unexpected but welcome development, the firm now seems to reject apps using emojis. Similarly, foreign technology firms that want to sell their wares in China face at least six different security reviews, each of which can be used to delay or block market access. As with America’s worries about Huawei, this is not entirely unreasonable. The NSA has in the past exploited, or created, vulnerabilities in hardware sold by American companies. Local firms, for their part, are pushed to use “indigenous and controllable core cyber-security technology”, in the words of a report presented at last year’s National People’s Congress.

In the driving seat
Good platform managers also ensure that all parts of the system work for the greater good. In China this means doing the government’s bidding, something which seems increasingly expected of tech companies. About three dozen tech companies have instituted Communist Party committees in the past few years. There are rumours that the party is planning to take 1% stakes in some firms, including Tencent, not so much to add to the government’s control as to signal it—and to advertise that the company enjoys official blessing.

Many of China’s tech firms help develop military applications for technology, too, something called “civil-military fusion”. Most American hardware-makers do the same; its internet giants, not so much. “There’s a general concern in the tech community of somehow the military-industrial complex using their stuff to kill people incorrectly, if you will,” Eric Schmidt, the head of the Pentagon’s Defence Innovation Advisory Board said last November, when he was still Alphabet’s executive chairman. When it recently emerged that Google was helping the Pentagon with the AI for a drone project, some of its employees were outraged.

And then there is the walled gardens’ most prized bloom: data. China’s privacy regulations can look, on the face of it, as strict as Europe’s. But privacy is not a priority in practice. Control is.
China  U.S._Navy  ecosystems  Silicon_Valley  semiconductors  artificial_intelligence  quantum_computing  intellectual_property  military-industrial_complex  dual-use  walled_gardens  new_tech_Cold_War  self-sufficiency 
april 2018
Global Britain or globaloney - Bagehot
Mar 15th 2018 | The Economist | Bagehot.

Mr Tugendhat’s committee worries that “global Britain” cannot be the basis of foreign policy because it is little more than an “advertising slogan”. This columnist thinks the problem goes deeper. Global Britain is three badly thought out ideas rolled into one....
The first is that, thanks to its long history as a trading nation and imperial power, Britain is an irreducibly global country.....The second idea is that being global means embracing emerging markets. Since 2000 these have accounted for more than 60% of the world’s economic growth. The European Union is the economic equivalent of a “legacy system”: locked in the past, overburdened by entitlements and regulations, terrified of the creative destruction at the heart of capitalism. The emerging world, by contrast, is a bubbling cauldron of new opportunities and new consumers. ....The third idea is that “global Britain” means the Anglosphere. This embraces countries around the world that share a common culture because they were once part of the British empire.....The phrase “global Britain” is well intentioned, designed to send a message that Britain is not withdrawing from the world by leaving the EU. It remains open for business, active on the world stage, bouncily cosmopolitan. But Britain needs to do more than remain open for business. It needs to work out ways of engaging without overstretching its abilities and of embracing globalisation without forgetting that it has downsides as well as upsides. Talking globaloney isn’t going to help.
Brexit  delusions  downside_risks  EU  fallacies_follies  globalization  overstretching  slogans  United_Kingdom  upside  world_stage 
april 2018
Former first lady Barbara Bush dies at 92 - The Globe and Mail
ENID NEMY
THE NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE
PUBLISHED APRIL 17, 2018
obituaries  women 
april 2018
How to reduce the risk of joint injuries in your fitness routine - The Globe and Mail
more young people are having joint replacement surgeries due in large part to their “repetitive athletic pursuits.” In other, less measured words: too many young people are training like dummies.

In most cases, overuse injuries are a result of poor program design, improper exercise selection or bad technique. All three of these factors tend to arise when overly excited rookie lifters go it alone. A smart strength coach or personal trainer will know how to help their clients avoid grinding their joints into dust by choosing the right exercises, in the right order, done the right way.

Strength Training Anatomy-3rd Edition Paperback – Mar 9 2010
by Frederic Delavier (Author)
fitness  injuries  exercise  strength_training  books  pain  anatomy 
april 2018
How does Chinese tech stack up against American tech?
Feb 15th 2018 | Economist | Schumpeter.

The Chinese venture-capital (VC) industry is booming. American visitors return from Beijing, Hangzhou and Shenzhen blown away by the entrepreneurial work ethic. Last year the government decreed that China would lead globally in artificial intelligence (AI) by 2030. The plan covers a startlingly vast range of activities, including developing smart cities and autonomous cars and setting global tech standards. Like Japanese industry in the 1960s, private Chinese firms take this “administrative guidance” seriously.

Being a global tech hegemon has been lucrative for America. Tech firms support 7m jobs at home that pay twice the average wage. Other industries benefit by using technology more actively and becoming more productive: American non-tech firms are 50% more “digitised” than European ones, says McKinsey, a consulting firm. America sets many standards, for example on the design of USB ports, or rules for content online, that the world follows. And the $180bn of foreign profits that American tech firms mint annually is a boon several times greater than the benefit of having the world’s reserve currency.

A loss of these spoils would be costly and demoralising. Is it likely? Schumpeter has compiled ten measures of tech supremacy. The approach owes much to Kai-Fu Lee of Sinovation Ventures, a Chinese VC firm. It uses figures from AllianceBernstein, Bloomberg, CB Insights, Goldman Sachs and McKinsey and includes 3,000 listed, global tech firms, 226 “unicorns”, or unlisted firms worth over $1bn, plus Huawei, a Chinese hardware giant.

The overall conclusion is that China is still behind. Using the median of the yardsticks, its tech industry is 42% as powerful as America’s. But it is catching up fast. In 2012 the figure was just 15%.......For Silicon Valley, it is time to get paranoid. Viewed from China, many of its big firms have become comfy monopolists. In the old days all American tech executives had to do to see the world’s cutting edge was to walk out the door. Now they must fly to China, too.
China  China_rising  U.S.  Silicon_Valley  Alibaba  Tencent  metrics  technical_standards  America_in_Decline?  work_ethic  complacency  Kai-Fu_Lee 
april 2018
Can Smartphones Stop the Death of the Salesman? - WSJ
By Khadeeja Safdar | Photographs by Dominick Reuter for The Wall Street Journal
April 15, 2018 8:00 a.m
smartphones  retailers  mens'_clothing  suits  apparel  salespeople  bricks-and-mortar 
april 2018
Japanese convenience stores limber up in effort to spur growth
April 15, 2018 | FT | Leo Lewis and Robin Harding in Tokyo YESTERDAY.

Over the next five years, FamilyMart — Japan’s second-biggest convenience store chain with revenues of ¥3.1tn ($29.5bn) — plans to open 300 Fit & Go gyms in a challenge to its two largest competitors, Seven & i Holdings and Lawson.

FamilyMart’s move into fitness highlights powerful trends that are transforming Japanese retail. They are creating fresh opportunities, say analysts, for the mighty konbini (a transliteration of “convenience”) to seize an ever greater share of consumer spend.

“Current social patterns — the rise of working women, the ageing population — are a strong following wind for the convenience store industry,” said Sadanobu Takemasu, chief executive of Lawson, the third-largest operator with ¥2.6tn sales and 14,000 stores. Rural depopulation is also on their side, with a konbini often the last shop standing in many communities.

“There are people who think Japan can manage with nothing but ecommerce and convenience stores. The big dry goods like toilet paper would come online,” he added. “All the day-to-day goods would come from the convenience store.”

But, say analysts, even the konbini face the challenge of population decline. Footfall at stores open for more than a year has fallen for 24 months in a row, the longest period since the Japan Franchise Association began compiling the statistics in 2004.

The answer to lower footfall is more revenue per customer. Having achieved dominance of their own industry through consolidation, the konbini are moving into other sectors, taking on supermarkets, coffee shops, drug stores and fast-food chains......“The convenience stores’ biggest challenge is the absence of a new category big enough to give the whole industry a lift,” said Mr Kawano, who added that even the ready-to-eat likes of the Famichiki had yet to prove their power to transform. “Each group is investing more in its fast-food offering — but there has been nothing revolutionary, no game changer.”
convenience_stores  retailers  Japanese  prepared_meals  Japan  foot_traffic  gyms  fast-food  trends  new_categories 
april 2018
BlackRock co-founder warns on complacency over Chinese tech
Owen Walker in Davos 2 HOURS AGO

“Apple was not in the music industry, Google was not in the mobile phone industry and Amazon was not in the groceries business — until they were,” he said. “Tech companies are going to enter the financial services market in a very, very aggressive way.” 

Ant Financial’s sprawling portfolio of businesses includes one of the world’s biggest credit scoring systems, a bank, an insurer and a lending platform for small businesses. It was reported last week by the FT and other news organisations that Ant Financial is seeking to raise at least $9bn in its latest private fundraising ahead of an initial public offering....“You have to expect there will be a threat from [Chinese] technology companies to financial services,” ....“But I would say Amazon is equally a threat to doing that.” 
BlackRock  Ant_Financial  complacency  threats  disruption  Alibaba  asset_management  financial_services 
april 2018
Review: Beyoncé Is Bigger Than Coachella
APRIL 15, 2018 | The New York Times | By JON CARAMANICA.

Beyoncé's Coachella performances this weekend and next are her only solo U.S. dates this year. “Thank you for allowing me to be the first black woman to headline Coachella,” she said midset, then added an aside that was, in fact, the main point: “Ain’t that ’bout a bitch.”

Big-tent festivals, generally speaking, are blithe spaces — they don’t invite much scrutiny, because they can’t stand up to it. But Beyoncé’s simple recitation of fact was searing, especially on the same night that, in Cleveland, the Rock & Roll Hall of Fame finally inducted Nina Simone and Sister Rosetta Tharpe, 15 and 45 years after their deaths, and also Bon Jovi, a band in which everyone is very much alive.
live_performances  music  Beyoncé  Coachella  superstars  celebrities  concerts  artists  music_festivals  women 
april 2018
(6) BODY FAT % LIES | Real Examples of Body Fat Percentage - YouTube
Body fat misconceptions........Dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA, previously DEXA[1][2]) is a means of measuring bone mineral density (BMD). Two X-ray beams, with different energy levels, are aimed at the patient's bones. When soft tissue absorption is subtracted out, the BMD can be determined from the absorption of each beam by bone. Dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry is the most widely used and most thoroughly studied bone density measurement technology.
strength_training 
april 2018
The Future of Elite Schools in the Trump Era (and the Future of Blogging) - The Atlantic
James Fallows
3:05 PM / April 14, 2018

a message that came in from a reader in an elite-university college town. (OK: It’s New Haven.) He says that an under-appreciated aspect of Donald Trump’s war on expertise deserves further attention. .....From where I sit, the schools are woefully under-prepared for the Trump onslaught and I predict that they will get slammed and have to change their policies. To imagine what future Harvard classes will look like if the schools lose the court cases, look to what happened to Berkeley when they were constrained by Proposition 209 from considering using affirmative action policies-- the percentage of Asian American and White students increased, while Black and Latino representation decreased.

When I think about the rise of Trump, I believe that part of the blame should rest at the feet of Harvard, Yale and their peers.

Clinton, Bush, and Obama stacked their administration with graduates from these schools and the global economic system that they created (and profited from) had important flaws that hurt certain sectors of the US and provided fertile ground for Trump's dark vision of a sort of economic conspiracy holding back real Americans. As a group, they often were arrogant and felt that they knew best. Yet they also weren't smart enough to understand how the economic world that they created actually had some fundamental flaws that would come to threaten the elite global world view that they thought was inevitable.
James_Fallows  elitism  Ivy_League  Colleges_&_Universities  Red_states  Donald_Trump  expertise  Department_of_Justice  admissions 
april 2018
Charles McDew, 79, Tactician for Student Civil Rights Group, Dies - The New York Times
By SAM ROBERTSAPRIL 13, 2018

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obituaries  Colleges_&_Universities  civil_rights  '60s  African-Americans 
april 2018
(6) Best Exercises to Build Your Lats | How-To Get a Wide Back - YouTube
Best Exercises to Build Your Lats | How-To Get a Wide (Back)

Pull with your elbows. Mind muscle focus on lats. Chin up.
strength_training  back_exercises  James_Grage 
april 2018
The 1960s were about capitalism, not radicalism
APRIL 13, 2018| FT | by Janan Ganesh.

Consider how many icons of the period combined beatnik ideals with a certain commercial worldliness.

The 50th anniversary of 1968 is a rolling event in literature, film and academia. Books such as Richard Vinen’s The Long ’68, which roves beyond Paris to America and eastern Europe, are worth reading, if only to retire the 21st-century conceit that international youth movements are somehow contingent on social media. But the commemorations will pastiche that decade if they tell of a straightforwardly leftist revolution that fell slightly short. The reality was more complex. It also survives yet. The blend of idealism (even righteousness) and commercial edge has become the creed of Silicon Valley. California is where the two faces of that decade kiss.
'60s  1968  anniversaries  commemoration  Janan_Ganesh 
april 2018
Why glass milk bottle deliveries are back
APRIL 13, 2018 | FT | by Carl Wilkinson.

Milk & More offers what Müller calls “a farm shop on wheels” with more than 200 locally sourced premium products (as well as normal and organic milk, it stocks free-range eggs, biscuits, bread, bacon, organic cheese and veg), which can be ordered online up to 9pm the night before and be waiting on your doorstep by 7am “like magic”. This year, Müller is investing a further £20m in the Milk & More business, revamping IT, upgrading machinery and — most visibly — from this month rolling out a new fleet of more than 200 electric floats to replace many of the older diesel vehicles used on longer rural rounds. “David Attenborough has reignited people’s love of the great British milkman,” he says.

Yet most of the investment in Milk & More was put in place well before Blue Planet II aired. What did Müller — who is Swiss and recalls visiting his local farm as a boy to collect milk in buckets — spot in the ailing business?

“We saw three general trends,” he says. “Customers want to know what they’re eating and who produced it. People are environmentally conscious and want to do their bit to reduce plastic waste. That’s why we kept the glass bottle and decided to keep the factory open. It’s great packaging. And finally, community values are becoming more important. The human touch and the sense of community are becoming more important in today’s world.”
dairy  home-delivery  tracking  traceability  last_mile  milkmen  glass_bottles 
april 2018
Technology has upended the world’s advertising giants - Mad men adrift
March 31st, 2018 | The Economist |

The world’s advertising giants are struggling to adapt to a landscape suddenly dominated by the duopoly of Google and Facebook. Some of their biggest clients, such as Procter & Gamble (P&G) and Unilever, are also being disrupted, in their case by smaller online brands and by Amazon. They are cutting spending on advertising services, and also building more capabilities in-house. Consultancies with digital expertise such as Deloitte and Accenture are competing with agencies, arguing that they know how to connect with consumers better, and more cheaply, using data, machine learning and app design.......This month Marc Pritchard, chief brand officer of P&G, criticised their (i.e. the ad giants) model as a “Mad Men” operation that is “archaic” and overly complex in an era when campaigns and ads need to be designed and refined quickly across lots of platforms.

Technological forces are buffeting this model.

(1) The first big challenge is disintermediation. Despite the growing backlash against the tech giants, Google and Facebook make it easy for firms big and small to advertise on their platforms and across the internet via their powerful ad networks.
(2) The second headache is the rise of ad-free content for consumers, especially on Netflix, and the corresponding disruption of ad-supported television, which has declining viewership globally.
(3) Third, Amazon’s e-commerce might, and the growing clout of internet-era direct-to-consumer upstarts, have weakened the distribution muscle and pricing power of the advertising giants’ biggest clients.....cost discipline among clients is driven partly by the influence of thrifty private-equity investors like 3G, the Brazilian owner of AB InBev, the world’s largest brewer......Sir Martin argues that the budgetary pressures that have forced his clients to cut back on advertising are a cyclical problem, not like the structural challenges posed by technological disruption.

In private, however, a senior executive at a rival ad-holding firm rejects much of this optimism. Technological disruption and disintermediation, he says, will only deepen. The efficiency of targeted digital ads means companies can spend less for the same outcome in branding. ....The advertising firms are responding by hiring away talent, acquiring businesses (in 2015 Publicis bought Sapient, a digital consultancy, for $3.7bn) and gradually changing how they make money. Their plans mostly boil down to two things: investing in digital services and consolidating their collections of businesses so that they can provide a range of services to one client more cheaply under one account.
advertising  economics  marketing  advertising_agencies  Martin_Sorrell  digital_strategies  WPP  Google  Facebook  Amazon  competitive_landscape  P&G  Unilever  disruption  Deloitte  Accenture  Publicis  Omnicom  via:sparkey  ad-tech  programmatic  direct-to-consumer 
april 2018
Wakandanomics
March 31st, 2018 | The Economist
Black_Panther 
april 2018
Drop It - Joel Osteen - YouTube
Drop it, Leave it. Let it go (God's in control). Life's too short to carry around negative baggage. Your destiny is too important, your time too valuable to go through the day weighted down by offence, guilt, disappointment, and hurts. Don't give in to temptation to pick it back up.
churches  forgiveness  grace  Joel_Osteen  mega-churches  pastors  positive_thinking  prosperity_gospel 
april 2018
The 60-second interview: Adi Ignatius, editor in chief, Harvard Business Review- POLITICO Media
By CAPITAL STAFF 04/28/2015

H.B.R. represented an amazing challenge. Here was a 90-year-old publication that had always done well but that needed reinvention. And so we reimagined everything—the magazine, the website, the book division. Our goal was to find ways to connect with new fans, while maintaining the same high standards. By any yardstick, it worked! Our circulation, at 300,000, is the highest it’s ever been, and our newsstand sales soared. Our readers are deeply engaged, and I interact with them all the time......CAPITAL: Harvard Business Review stories do particularly well in terms of social shares on LinkedIn. What do you make of LinkedIn's ambitions to become a media company, with in-house editors looking over user-generated articles? How those ambitions impact your publication?

IGNATIUS: Yes, H.B.R. content does well across the major social channels, including LinkedIn. We respect LinkedIn and have watched it evolve more and more into a content player. But we’re excited about what we’re doing at H.B.R. and fully expect to remain a valued destination for people in business who love ideas. We’re in the process of reinvention again, redefining what it means to be a subscriber, to be part of the H.B.R. experience. It’s exciting, and we look forward to unveiling it before too long.
HBR  social_media  reinvention  reimagining  magazines  newsstand_circulation  LinkedIn 
april 2018
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