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Opinion | I Was Wandering. Toni Morrison Found Me.
Aug. 9, 2019 | The New York Times | By Jesmyn Ward.
Ms. Ward is the author, most recently, of the novel “Sing, Unburied, Sing.”
African-Americans  authors  books  fiction  obituaries  Toni_Morrison  tributes  women  writers 
august 2019
Creative summer: visiting an art gallery
AUGUST 19, 2019 | | Financial Times | by Isabel Berwick.

Viewing John Ruskin: The Power of Seeing, an exhibition of artworks and objects from Museums Sheffield and the Guild of St George — a charity founded by the English polymath, which he endowed with a tiny museum intended for what the exhibition guide calls “the iron workers of Sheffield”. ....Ruskin, who wrote about 9m words in his lifetime and was variously an art critic, artist, social commentator, polemicist, philanthropist and thoroughly eminent Victorian (he died in 1900), has left one of the most creative legacies that most of us will ever encounter. What can he teach us about creativity at work?....the guide talks about the artist’s ideas about the ways in which we see the world around us — and how we can learn to see more clearly, and in more detail. ...Ruskin believed that in order to properly observe, one had to draw what one is seeing — not something we could do in the gallery, but it suggests a different way of engaging with the world around us for some of the people on the team. “Ruskin was a great joiner of the dots, and showing that everything is connected,”........the surprising ways in which we can make connections — suddenly seems to be one of the most important ways in which we can be more creative in a workplace focused on being “agile” and “collaborative”. We tend to think in well-defined ways, with longstanding colleagues whose reactions we can often guess in advance.....the importance of just . . . noticing. Of finding beauty and interest in a wide range of things, just for the sake of it, and allowing thoughts to drift about.....The simple act of looking at beautiful things, the sort of activity Ruskin would have considered a good in itself, is a way of taking time out to be reflective.
+++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++

Rob |Aug 20, 2019.

I’m on board with the thrust of the article. I’m fortunate (although it doesn’t often feel that way) to work for an artist. This has given me access to yet more artists and regular recommendations for exhibitions.

Two recent examples are ‘Beyond the Streets’, an exploration of graffiti and it’s genesis in Brooklyn, and ‘Visions of the Self’ at Gagosian in London — both were mind-bending-ly good; both were outside my usual interests and I wouldn’t have attended unless pushed.

I really don’t know anything about graffiti or Rembrandt. However, visiting an exhibition with a knowledgeable friend, provided they aren’t particularly overbearing, is a delightful experience that, to my own surprise, leaves me feeling both rejuvenated and creatively invigorated. (Anecdotally. I haven’t done an RCT to assess the impact on my work...)

The upshot: provided they’re well assembled, almost any exhibition can provide relaxation and stimulation in equal measure.
art  art_galleries  attention  connecting_the_dots  creative_renewal  creativity  focus  mindfulness  museums  noticing  observations  pay_attention  reflections  serendipity  think_differently 
august 2019
New Ontario initiative targets complex, white-collar crimes
AUGUST 20, 2019 | The Globe and Mail | GREG MCARTHUR.

The Ontario government has quietly launched an initiative intended to solve a problem that has vexed Canadian law enforcement: the successful prosecution of complex, white-collar crimes.

With little fanfare, the province has created what it is calling the Serious Fraud Office (SFO), with a structure that is novel to Canada: teaming up investigators and prosecutors and dedicating them to financial crimes that are too sprawling for any one municipal police force to handle.....Ontario’s office, however, will investigate an array of financial crimes, not just money laundering but large-scale fraud and corruption. It was created to fix long-standing issues with how the government combats such crimes, the two officials in charge of the initiative said in an interview......One of the primary goals is to bridge gaps between investigators and prosecutors......to prevent cases from languishing and forcing judges to throw them out because of unconstitutional court delays. Unlike a traditional police investigation, the SFO’s structure means prosecutors will be heavily involved from the outset of a case........The SFO is also designed to thwart an issue common to most police departments: the frequent shifting of resources away from fraud units whenever police are confronted with a more pressing public-safety issue, such as a threat of terrorism......“White-collar crime investigations are both complex and lengthy. Specialization and long-term experience of both prosecutors and the investigators will be critical to success.”
corruption  financial_crimes  financial_penalties  fraud  fraud_detection  groundbreaking  large-scale  law_enforcement  legal_strategies  money_laundering  Ontario  prosecutors  Queens_Park  securities_enforcement  securities_industry  white-collar  white-collar_crime 
august 2019
Looking Ahead After a Quarter Century Into the Digital Age - CIO Journal
Aug 16, 2019 | WSJ | By Irving Wladawsky-Berger.

* Large economic potential is linked to digitization—and much of it is yet to be captured
* Digital superstars are rising far beyond the U.S. big four and China’s big three
* Digital natives are calling the shots
* Digital changes everything—even industry boundaries
* Agile is the new way to compete
* Playing the platform economy can boost earnings
* Self-cannibalization and innovation are a necessity for digital reinvention
* Going after the right M&A is key
* Effective management of digital transformation is vital—but challenging
* Leveraging and transitioning from digital to new frontier technologies is an imperative


Effective management of digital transformation is vital—but challenging. High incidences of failure can be found across industries and countries regardless of the objectives of the digital transformation, including customer experience, the most common type of transformation.

The report recommends five key actions to improve the odds of a successful digital transformation: shared responsibility and accountability; clarity of objectives and commitment; sufficient resources; investments in digital talent; and flexibility and agility.
artificial_intelligence  digital_economy  digital_natives  digitalization  industry_boundaries  insights  Irving_Wladawsky-Berger  McKinsey  M&A  millennials  platforms  self-cannibalization 
august 2019
How the 1619 Project Came Together
Aug. 18, 2019 | The New York Times | By Lovia Gyarkye.

This month is the 400th anniversary of that ship’s arrival. To commemorate this historic moment and its legacy, The New York Times Magazine has dedicated an entire issue and special broadsheet section, out this Sunday, to exploring the history of slavery and mapping the ways in which it has touched nearly every aspect of contemporary life in the United States.

The 1619 Project began as an idea pitched by Nikole Hannah-Jones, one of the magazine’s staff writers, during a meeting in January.......it was a big task, one that would require the expertise of those who have dedicated their entire lives and careers to studying the nuances of what it means to be a black person in America. Ms. Hannah-Jones invited 18 scholars and historians — including Kellie Jones, a Columbia University art historian and 2016 MacArthur Fellow; Annette Gordon-Reed, a professor of law and history at Harvard; and William Darity, a professor of public policy at the Samuel DuBois Cook Center on Social Equity at Duke University — to meet with editors and journalists at The Times early this year. The brainstorming session cemented key components of the issue, including what broad topics would be covered (for example, sugar, capitalism and cotton) and who would contribute (including Linda Villarosa, Bryan Stevenson and Khalil Gibran Muhammad). The feature stories were then chiseled by Ms. Hannah-Jones with the help of Ilena Silverman, the magazine’s features editor......Almost every contributor in the magazine and special section — writers, photographers and artists — is black, a nonnegotiable aspect of the project that helps underscore its thesis.......“A lot of ideas were considered, but ultimately we decided that there was an undeniable power in narrowing our focus to the very place that this issue kicks off,”.......even though slavery was formally abolished more than 150 years ago, its legacy has remained insidious. .....The special section.... went through several iterations before it was decided that it would focus on painting a more full, but by no means comprehensive, picture of the institution of slavery itself.......The 1619 Project is first and foremost an invitation to reframe how the country discusses the role and history of its black citizens. “

========================================================
The 1619 Project is, by far, one of the most ambitious and courageous pieces of journalism that I have ever encountered. It addresses American history as it really is: America pretended to be a democracy at its founding, yet our country practices racism through its laws, policies, systems and institutions. Our nation still wrestles with this conflict of identities. The myth of The Greatest Nation blinds us to the historical, juxtaposed reality of the legacy of slavery, racism and democracy, and the sad, inalienable fact that racism and white supremacy were at the root of this nation’s founding.
=========================================================
KM
Well, look forward to 4 more years of Trump I guess. The Times' insistence on reducing all of American history to slavery is far more blind and dogmatic than previous narratives which supposedly did not give it enough prominence. The North was already an industrial powerhouse without slavery, and continued to develop with the aid of millions of European immigrants who found both exploitation but also often the American dream, and their descendents were rightly known as the greatest generation. I celebrate a country that was more open to immigrants than most, and that was more democratic than most, rather than obsess about its imperfections, since they pale against the imperfections of every other country on the planet.
==========================================================
Linda
Aug. 19
@KM Can't let your comments go as the voice of Pittsburgh on this forum, so must register my disagreement with your comments as a different voice in Pittsburgh. FYI, my white immigrant ancestors toiled in the coal mines of western PA, so I'm aware of the work of the European immigrants. But I am grateful to have my eyes opened on many topics through Sunday's paper. Slavery is a deeply shameful chapter in our history. If trying to come to terms with the living legacy of that abominable chapter is "obsessing about its imperfections," then I hope I may be called an obsessive.
African-Americans  anniversaries  commemoration  focus  history  howto  journalism  legacies  newspapers  NYT  photography  slavery  storytelling 
august 2019
How to Pursue a Side Hustle or Startup While Working Full Time
July 31, 2019, 4:00 AM EDT Updated on August 1, 2019, - Bloomberg By Arianne Cohen
millennials  side_hustles  start_ups 
august 2019
Now bigger than eBay, Shopify sets its sights on Amazon
August 20, 2019 | Financial Times | by Tim Bradshaw, Global Technology Correspondent.

.....ecommerce via social media platforms such as Instagram and Pinterest, which have become vital to growing online retail outside Amazon, and increasingly important to Shopify.

“Instagram has been the most phenomenal growth vector for small businesses,” said Mr Lütke. “It's a great way to tell stories about products that Amazon, with its static pictures and very sanitised listings, doesn't offer people.” 
Amazon  e-commerce  fulfillment  logistics  retailers  Shopify  Tobias_Lütke 
august 2019
400 years since slavery: a timeline of American history
Fri 16 Aug 2019 07.00 BST Last modified on Fri 16 Aug 2019 07.57 BST | News | The Guardian by Khushbu Shah and Juweek Adolphe

This article drew on a number of books about the American history of slavery, including The Half Has Never Been Told: Slavery and the Making of American Capitalism by Edward E Baptist; American Slavery, 1619-1877 by Peter Kolchin; and Black Is a Country: Race and the Unfinished Struggle for Democracy by Nikil Pal Singh. It also used census data available online at census.gov.
African-Americans  anniversaries  books  disenfranchisement  Great_Migration  history  Jim_Crow  reparations  slavery  timelines  voter_suppression 
august 2019
How to Increase Your Bench Press (FASTEST WAY!) - YouTube
How to increase your bench press by not actually doing the bench press. Casey Mitchell's biggest gains came from doing accessory movements that help to perform bench press better. Perform these accessory movements more often in a given training block, than the bench press itself. These work because they all us to work through our weak points.

(1) Pause bench. You have to overcome inertia. Also emphasizes the importance of leg drive....3-second or 5-second pause....The weight fatigues your chest, fatigues your triceps, to get it to move, you need to engage your legs.
(2) Dumbbell floor press. Opportunity to work the lockout portion of the bench press to help with the weak point (weak) triceps are impeding you from getting to a good full strong bench press. The adduction benefits, more activation of the chest; plus a good safety net of using the floor; finally, need to know how to get the dumbbells into position. Benefit of getting the elbows into the right position. Lot harder than the barbell. Cut the weight in pursuit of control
(3) Incline static dumbbell press. Combines elements of isometric strength and concentric strength--demands performance of your concentric strength in a fatigued state. Up (both arms) for one count. Then, bring one arm down to 45 degrees with the chest fully engaged. Then using the other arm, move for 5 reps. Then come down and hold with that arm. Now move the other (resting) arm for five reps. Then now move both arms for 5 reps.
accessory_movements  advice  AthleanX  bench_press  chest  howto  power_of_the_pause  strength_training  tips 
august 2019
How to Know If You're a Morning Person
AUG 13, 2019 | The Atlantic | by OLGA KHAZAN.
early_risers  sleep 
august 2019
How Bill Gates reads books - YouTube
* Don't start a book you cannot finish.
* Concentrate. As you take in new knowledge, how does it attach to knowledge you already have?
* Dedicate at least an hour/day to the task of reading
billgates  books  howto  note_taking  reading 
august 2019
How to Get Bigger Biceps (TALLER & WIDER!) - YouTube
(1) Bend back the wrists. Use a single dumbbell.
(a) do reps so that the top of the dumbbell is always visible to you for the entire duration of the curl. Hold and squeeze at the top (use 'dead wrists').
(b) Never execute witht he curl bar in your fingers (you'll get golfer's elbow). Grip deep in our hands. Never stress your wrists.

(2) Chin-ups (no wrist curls) Bend back the wrists. Grip bar deep into the hand) Lift. Keep the tension on.

(3) High cable curl. Don't curl with your forearms. Use dead wrists. ll the work is to be done by the biceps.
AthleanX  biceps  chin-ups  pull-ups  strength_training 
august 2019
Opinion: Canada’s wisest policy: stealing policies from other countries
AUGUST 11, 2019 | The Globe and Mail | by CHRIS RAGAN, director of the Max Bell School of Public Policy at McGill University and chair of Canada’s Ecofiscal Commission.

Putting a price on pollution works around the world. It’s about time Canada stole another good policy idea.

Canada has a rich tradition of thievery – and it’s a good thing we do. Much of our success comes from adopting sound policies that have already proven successful elsewhere.

We implemented employment insurance in 1935, a full 15 years after it was introduced in Britain. We achieved universal health care in the early 1970s, a decade after many European countries. We adopted the GST 25 years ago, following a global trend toward “value-added taxes” that was already mature by the time we came on the scene.

The same is true of carbon pricing. It may be a contentious policy in Canada today, but there is nothing Canadian about carbon pricing; we introduced it here precisely because it works so well in other countries.
Canada  carbon_pricing  environment  policymaking  carbon  carbon_credits  carbon_tax  thievery  theft 
august 2019
Scientists still puzzled by the causes of osteoarthritis, but new ideas emerge
August 12, 2019 | The Globe and Mail | by ALEX HUTCHINSON
SPECIAL TO THE GLOBE AND MAIL
PUBLISHED 8 HOURS AGO
Alex_Hutchinson  exercise  fitness  injuries  osteoarthritis  running 
august 2019
How small business can still make waves online - The Globe and Mail
August 8, 2019 | Special to the Globe and Mail | by Kim McLaughlin.

First, it’s imperative that small and medium-sized enterprises (SMEs) have a strategy. When I tell my SME clients this, they think it will cost tens of thousands of dollars. Not so. Many talented consultants can help SMEs develop their strategy for less than $10,000, but here’s the key: Have a road map before you begin because it will save you money and empower serious return on investment.

I recommend that small businesses spend 5% - to 10 % of their marketing budget on the strategic plan and that must come first.

A strategic plan identifies your company’s niche market and your marketing objectives (ensuring they align with the business objectives). It also defines what is important to that specific demographic, and how and where to reach it. A set of key messages drives what kind of content should be created for the company so it can meet its objectives.

For example, I often see professional-service firms trying to expand their C-Suite client database by investing in Google AdWords. The reality is that most CEOs hire professional-service firms based on referrals, not through an online search. Provided the firm already has a solid website and looks credible online, it’s best to focus their marketing efforts on developing the team’s presence on LinkedIn. This kind of activity makes better sense and is cost effective.

When we look at marketing efforts from a strategic vantage point, it doesn’t matter that the big firm down the street has a $50,000 per month AdWords budget. B2B business is based on relationships, not flash activity. For a smaller firm, real-world relationship building is a winning strength to be leveraged.

On the other side of the spectrum, let’s consider a retail company marketing to older teens, and the goal is to increase market share. A limited budget may be better spent sponsoring young influencers on networks such as TikTok or Twitch, rather than attempting to out-advertise big companies on the big networks.

These grassroots approaches are effective and promise to deliver better returns than attempting to compete with big company budgets online.

SMEs can definitely be heard loud and clear in the world of digital marketing, but it takes strategic thinking and a return to strategic grassroots marketing where it’s not the number of relationships that wins the day, but the strength of those relationships.
business_planning  buyer_choice_rejection  digital_influencers  digital_strategies  e-commerce  grass-roots  LinkedIn  referrals  roadmaps  small_business  SMEs  social_media  strategy  strategic_planning  TikTok  Twitch 
august 2019
The Challenges of Automation in a Fast Changing Economy - CIO Journal. - WSJ
Aug 9, 2019 |WSJ | By Irving Wladawsky-Berger.

“Technological innovation should be embraced,” notes a recent report from the Aspen Institute, a public policy and research organization in Washington. “Automation has been a largely positive economic and social force, and looking forward, automation will be necessary to feed, house, and raise the living standards of a growing and aging population.”

Still, the short-term disruptive impact on individuals and communities can’t be overlooked, the report says.

To better assess automation’s impact, the Aspen Institute takes a two-pronged approach, identifying the challenges for American workers and suggesting solutions. Here is a summary of the findings:

Part I: The Case for Action

“Overall, it is difficult to anticipate every disruptive impact technology can have. But the use of technology to automate work is easier to predict than other impacts because automation is based on machines doing currently identifiable tasks," the report says. "For that reason, automation is the lens technologists, academics, and others use to project technology’s future impact on work, with the understanding that the actual disruptive impact of technology could be broader and more unpredictable.”

The Case for Action reached four major conclusions.

Automation boosts economic growth, creates jobs and improves living standards, but it also presents serious challenges for workers and communities. A number of recent studies have taken a close look at the future of work over the next 10 to 15 years. For example, a December 2017 report by McKinsey & Co. examined in great detail the work that’s likely to be displaced by automation through 2030, as well as the jobs that are likely to be created over the same period. The report concluded that a growing technology-based economy will create a significant number of new occupations that will more than offset declines in occupations displaced by automation. However, many workers will see their jobs change, as future jobs will require different skills.

Moreover, given the increasing importance of talent in our knowledge economy, global superstar firms and cities will continue to attract a disproportionate share of the most ambitious and talented people, presenting serious challenges for the workers and communities left behind.

Investments in education, training and the social safety net have helped mitigate automation’s negative impacts in the past. Technology has been replacing workers and improving productivity ever since the advent of the Industrial Revolution in the second half of the 18th century. In past technology-based economic revolutions, periods of creative destruction and high unemployment eventually subsided. Over time, these same disruptive technologies and innovations led to the transformation of the economy and the creation of new industries and new jobs.

“Investments in education, training, and the social safety net, along with a social contract between employers and workers that provided workplace benefits and protections, have helped mitigate automation’s negative impacts in the past and helped workers succeed in the changing economy,” the report says. These investments made it possible for a growing number of workers to achieve a middle class life-style and aspire to what we think of as the American way of life.

Recent challenges highlight the consequences of limited support for vulnerable workers. While we are hopeful that the country will once more adjust to technological disruptions, there’s no way of knowing for sure. “Today’s workers are especially vulnerable to the impacts of automation. Financial insecurity, an aging workforce, and falling geographic mobility, make it difficult for many to retrain and transition to new occupations following displacement.”

In addition, “Recent history has seen a reversal of efforts to support workers through economic disruption. Disinvestment in public and private sector training, a weakened public safety net, and reduced access to workplace benefits and protections have contributed to the slow and painful economic adjustment many workers and communities have experienced in recent decades.”

Artificial intelligence and other new technologies may lead to deeper, faster, broader and more disruptive automation. Technology is being increasingly applied to activities requiring cognitive capabilities and problem-solving intelligence that not long ago were viewed as the exclusive domain of humans. As powerful technologies like AI and robotics continue to advance, the impact of automation might well be deeper.

Part II: Policies for Shared Prosperity

The report’s second section outlines a concrete policy agenda to address four overarching objectives:

Encourage employers to lead a human-centric approach to automation. This includes expanding apprenticeships, worker-training tax credits and regional workforce partnerships; promoting new forms of worker participation in automation decisions; and introducing proactive strategies to identify and address potential issues.

Enable workers to access skills training, good jobs and new economic opportunities. This includes access to effective and affordable skills training, a system of lifelong learning, wage subsidies as necessary, and programs to promote entrepreneurship.

Help people and communities recover from displacements. Unemployed workers need to be supported through retraining, re-employment services and unemployment insurance. Governments should promote local and regional economic development through targeted strategies to help workers recover and transition and they should also invest in digital infrastructure.

Understand the impact of automation on the workforce. It is important to collect data and provide better information to key stakeholders so they can better anticipate the impact of automation on their industries, communities and occupations.

Irving Wladawsky-Berger worked at IBM for 37 years and has been a strategic adviser to Citigroup, HBO and Mastercard. He is affiliated with MIT and Imperial College, and is a regular contributor to CIO Journal.
automation  disruption  Irving_Wladawsky-Berger  way_of_life 
august 2019
What if you’re not chosen for a ‘hi-po’ programme?
AUGUST 10, 2019 | Financial Times | Elizabeth Uviebinené.

Organisations naturally need to have a leadership pipeline through which they identify, develop and promote high potential (hi-po) employees who can lead the company in the future. However, given that most will not be selected, it is inevitable that some talented individuals will feel overlooked.

Organisations devote significant resources to these “chosen few”. They give a few individuals privileged access to training, exposure to decision makers and mentorship, all of which helps propel them towards the coveted top spot..... such programmes are invitation only. But how to get invited on to them is usually a closely guarded secret. Sometimes it is a formal process, but at other times it is at the discretion of senior management....So what happens when you are not chosen for a “fast track” programme? It is easy to start questioning your capabilities and even aspirations. It can be a motivation killer at first, leaving you feeling undervalued.....Harvard Business Review data suggests companies are bad at correctly identifying high-potential employees....The best organisations build a culture that nurtures high-potential individuals whether or not there is a formal talent development programme in place. This is especially true for women and minorities in the workplace who remain under-represented at every level in the corporate talent pipeline....New research from Northwestern University in the US suggests that early career hurdles actually help spur future success. The study showed that experiencing setbacks at the start of a career has a powerful and opposing effect: “Individuals with near misses systematically outperformed those with near wins in the long run.”

Early success does not always predict future success. Longer term, what you do when faced with disappointment usually determines whether or not you have what it takes to have a successful career....If you just missed out on a talent development programme, do not be disheartened. It leaves open the possibility of proving yourself on your own terms, rather than getting boxed into one company’s view of what leadership looks like.
career_paths  fast_track  HBR  high-achieving  invitation-only  leadership  leadership_development  Managing_Your_Career  mentoring  middle_management  movingonup  selection_processes  strivers  talent  talent_management  talent_pipelines  talent_spotting  talent_scouting  training  up-and-comers 
august 2019
Success in academia is as much about grit as talent - Daily chart
May 10th 2019 | Economist |

St. Matthew (Chapter 13, verse 12)
For whosoever hath, to him shall be be given, and he shall have more abundance: but whosoever hath not, from him shall be taken away even that he hath."

IN 1968 ROBERT MERTON, a sociologist at Columbia University, identified a feature of academic life that he called the Matthew effect. The most talented scientists, he observed, tend to have access to the most resources and the best opportunities, and receive a disproportionate amount of credit for their work, thus amplifying their already enhanced reputations and careers. Less brilliant ones, meanwhile, are often left scrambling for money and recognition.

....... success in the sciences does not always breed more success, and that scientists who fail early in their careers may benefit from the experience. .......While some of this can be explained by the weakest scientists in the no-grant group giving up, the three researchers showed that other, unobservable, characteristics such as “effort” or “grit” are also at work. Overall, the authors conclude, the findings are consistent with the concept that “what doesn’t kill me makes me stronger”.
academia  grit  Matthew_effect  scriptures  talent  virtuous_cycles  winner-take-all 
august 2019
Opinion: How patents really work in the innovation economy - The Globe and Mail
August 8, 2019 | NATALIE RAFFOUL
SPECIAL TO THE GLOBE AND MAIL
PUBLISHED 3 HOURS AGO

The concern that patent trolls are targeting Canadian startups is also unfounded. Patent trolls aren’t concerned with pre-revenue or low-revenue-generating startups. However, profitable Canadian SMEs (that is, not startups) operating in the United States are being targeted by U.S. patent holders.

All that said, the issue of patent assertion is not as bleak a situation as many paint it to be. Many of our SMEs are successfully fending off these patent assertions by NPEs, and there are mechanisms, such as inter partes review and re-examination at the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office, that are a cheaper alternative to U.S. patent litigation and which enable our SMEs to invalidate weak patents.

Concerns that multiple overlapping IP claims are creating gridlock are also questionable. By definition, each patent covers a unique invention. A patent must have novelty and cannot be obvious. One idea, one patent. That said, ideas are built upon ideas. Company A may have a patent on a new product idea and then Company B develops an improvement on that product. For Company B to sell Company A’s product in combination with its improvement, Company B may need to license a product patent from Company A. Company B could also offer a license to its improvement back to Company A in a cross-licensing arrangement. If Company A refuses to license its patent to Company B, then Company B has three options: (1) if possible, invalidate Company A’s patent; (2) wait until Company A’s patent expires; or (3) develop a workaround to Company A’s patent. Most companies will innovate and choose option (3), and that is the premise of the patent system: to spur innovation.

We cannot develop a “made-in-Canada” solution for patenting Canada’s innovation. The reality is that, for most Canadian companies, a Canadian patent is really of secondary value – many of our companies don’t even bother to seek patents in Canada, and they focus their patent protection in the United States, Europe and China. Our Canadian companies are competing on a global scale and we need to play by the rules of this global patent game.

The discussion around patenting activity in Canada should also move beyond the question of whether to patent (of course they should) to one of helping our Canadian startups and SMEs with the costs associated with global patenting activity. In Quebec, the First Patent Program has been very successful in providing “matching” funds up to $25,000 to Quebec companies seeking their first patent. We should look at a similar program across Canada.

Such incentives are critical because investors are interested in funding Canadian startups that have patents or patents pending. If the startup is not successful, investors may be able to leverage the patent assets to recover some of their investment. If the startup is successful, the patents enable the startup to protect its market share and, if it so chooses, generate additional revenue through licensing the patents to competitors or companies in other fields.
Canada  Canadian  cross-licensing  intellectual_property  patents  patent_infringement  patent_law  patent_litigation  patent_trolls  USPTO  workarounds 
august 2019
Opinion: Canada’s soaring subway construction costs need to get back on track - The Globe and Mail
JONATHAN ENGLISH AND ALON LEVY
CONTRIBUTED TO THE GLOBE AND MAIL
PUBLISHED 2 HOURS AGO
DRL  infrastructure  Toronto  transit  TTC 
august 2019
Returning to your primal state | The GoodLife Fitness Blog
The BIG five compound movements are squats, deadlifts, bench presses, barbell rows and overhead barbell presses.

* Why are compound movements important?
Compound movements are any exercise that engages two or more different joints, therefore impacting multiple muscles during the same exercise. They improve overall fitness by benefitting the key categories: cardiovascular health, strength and flexibility.

* More burn
Compound movements burn more calories than an isolation exercise. As you build more muscle, your basal metabolic rate (the rate at which you burn calories when at rest) goes up. While doing compound movements, your body expends about five calories of energy to consume one litre of oxygen. That means that an exercise involving more muscle tissue, such as compound movements, requires more oxygen and that helps burn more calories.

* Benefits of each compound movement
SQUAT
Squats activate the muscles all over the upper and lower body. They are a relatively easy movement to learn, but there are varieties and progressions that offer challenges on the way to mastering them.Physical benefits:
Enhance the mobility in the hips and ankles
Challenge your core stabilizers, posterior chain and lower leg
Correct muscle imbalances
Life benefits:
Ease movements such as bending down to lift boxes, working in the garden, trying on shoes at the mall or picking up after a dog during a walk
DEADLIFT
Deadlifts target lats, glutes, hamstrings and core stabilizers, but also work your entire body. They are a great exercise for stabilizing the posterior chain, which is the group of muscles through your whole back.Physical benefits:
Improve overall speed, power and athleticism
Help create a nice shape, especially the butt and legs
Life benefits:
Help when you're doing movements such as picking up heavy boxes or lifting kids
BENCH PRESS
Bench presses are the most effective exercise to gain upper-body strength and mass.Physical benefits:
Increase overall upper-body strength
Improve cardiovascular function
Life benefits:
Anything that requires pushing, whether that's pushing a stroller or a lawnmower or attempting power-sled exercises in the gym
BARBELL ROW
This is one of the key exercises that carries over to the other big lifts. If you do it well, you'll improve all the other compound movements.Physical benefits:
Strengthens the back
Reinforces proper hip function
Life benefits:
Improves posture
Helps undo some of the damage of sitting every day
OVERHEAD BARBELL PRESS
While the overhead barbell press strengthens the upper body, particularly shoulder muscles, it also gives your stabilizers a workout as you maintain proper form.Physical benefits:
Strengthens the rotator cuff, which helps people who are internally rotated
Reduces the risk of shoulder injuries
Life benefits:
Eases the impact of constantly looking down at cellphones
Improves posture
You can start off with bodyweight, rather than weights..... air squat can still deliver a workout. You can also just use the bar without weights. .....Perfecting the movements helps ward off injury when you do load on some weight. Once you’re comfortable with the movements, put together a periodized plan (ask a GoodLife professional about a 5x5 program to get you started). You’ll soon see and feel the benefits of more strength, increased energy, better posture and higher fat burn.
chest  deadlifts  Goodlife  metabolic_rate  strength_training  squats  fitness  glutes  military_press  compound_movements  functional_strength  core_stability 
august 2019
From sexsomnia to birdseed snacks, author Guy Leschziner explains the mysterious realm of sleep - The Globe and Mail
WENCY LEUNG HEALTH
PUBLISHED AUGUST 5, 2019

Leschziner’s new book, The Nocturnal Brain: Nightmares, Neuroscience, and the Secret World of Sleep, explores how the brain functions – and what happens when it doesn’t – through the remarkable stories of his patients.

The brain does not simply shut off when we sleep, and turn on again when we wake, he explains. Rather, various parts of this complex organ can be in different stages of sleep and wakefulness at the same time.
books  brain_chemistry  neurosciences  sleep 
august 2019
Toni Morrison Taught Me How to Think
Aug. 7, 2019 | The New York Times | By Wesley Morris.

You need to be able to read to be able to read. Especially if Toni Morrison did the writing. [because Toni Morrison's writings demanded much of the reader as her evocative words painted a rich context and vivid imagery.......She was going to make us [you, the reader] work, not as a task, not for medicine, but because writing is an art and a reader should have a little art of his own.....Reading a Toni Morrison novel was group therapy. My aunts, my mother and her friends would tackle “Beloved” in sections then get on the phone to run things by one another......They admired the stew of a Morrison novel, the elegant density of its language — the tapestry of a hundred-word sentence, the finger snap of a lone word followed by a period, the staggering depictions of lust, death, hair care, lost limbs, baking and ghosts. Morrison made her audiences conversant in her — the metaphors of trauma, the melodramas of psychology. She made them hungry for more stew: ornate, disobedient, eerie literary inventions about black women, often with nary a white person of any significance in sight. The women in my family were reading a black woman imagining black women, their wants, their warts, how the omnipresence of this country’s history can make itself known on any old Thursday.....A life spent savoring Toni Morrison, both as a novelist and a scalding, scaldingly moral literary critic, makes clear that almost no one has better opening sentences......This is all to say that Toni Morrison didn’t teach me how to read. But she did teach me how to read. Hers is the kind of writing that makes you rewind and slow down and ruminate. It’s the kind of writing that makes you rewind because, god, what you just read was that titanic, that perception-altering, that true, a spice on the tongue. .......Morrison is dead now, her legend long secure. But what comedy to think how the writers and critics who loved her labored to get her mastery treated as majesty when she’s so evidently supreme. .....She did for generations of writers what Martin Scorsese did for generations of filmmakers — jolt them, for better and worse, into purpose. Morrison didn’t make me a writer, exactly. What she made me was a thinker. She made the thinking seem uniquely crucial to the matter of being alive......I have now by my bed is some novel by Toni Morrison, whether or not I’m reading it. A night light for my soul. And, in every way, a Good Book.
African-Americans  authors  books  craftsmanship  critical_thinking  howto  novelists  novels  obituaries  purpose  reading  Slow_Movement  soul-enriching  Toni_Morrison  tributes  women  writers  writing 
august 2019
NYT Programs – Be a Better Reader in 7 Days
August 7, 2019 | NYT | by Tina Jordan.

(1) Choosing The Right Book
start by asking yourself some questions:
* Do you want to read for enjoyment or for knowledge?
* Do you want to stretch yourself in some way?
* Are you looking for escapism? (There’s nothing wrong with that!)
* Do you want to be part of the cultural conversation around the current “it” book?
* Are you curious about a book that has been atop the best-seller list for months?
However you answer these questions, find a book to focus on this week. You don’t need to buy one: Pluck a book from your shelves at home, borrow from a friend, download a book to your phone from participating libraries or simply swing by a Little Free Library on your way home to see what the reading fates have in store for you.

(2) Make a Reading Plan
A good reading plan is a commitment to keep reading a part of your life. How you go about that will depend a lot on your personality, of course. (what are my greatest challenges: Finding time? Turning off the TV?)

A reading plan doesn’t have to include a schedule — although that’s helpful — but it should include a goal or promise to yourself that will keep you motivated. The more specific and detailed your reading goal is, the better your chances are of reaching it: Goal-setting has been linked to higher achievement.

Neuroscience shows that it helps to put your plan in writing. “People who very vividly describe or picture their goals are anywhere from 1.2 to 1.4 times more likely to successfully accomplish their goal.”

So how are you going to finish that book you picked yesterday? As you make your reading plan, consider these factors:

* Set aside the time. Decide how much time you would like to devote to reading every day — a half-hour? an hour? — and where you could carve out that time: on your commute, during your lunch break, in lieu of watching TV. If you think you simply don’t have the time to read, try reading instead of using social media this week. If you keep a calendar — digital or paper — schedule your reading time like you would anything else.
* Allow yourself to quit a book. Nothing will derail you faster than books that don’t hold your interest. You could commit to reading 50 pages of a book before you make a decision. Or you could simply trust your gut: If you realize in a book’s opening pages that it is absolutely not right for you, then put it down and pick up another one, no guilt included.
* Find a reading buddy. Some people find it easier to commit to a reading challenge when they have a friend doing the same thing. Others incorporate book-reading challenges into family time. Feel free to forward this challenge to a friend and have your friend read the same book alongside you.
* Commit to your plan for this book in writing. And then stick to it.

Make a Life-Changing Goal
A reading plan can be for more than just one book; it can be for the rest of your life. Here are some worthy goals to consider:

Read a certain number of books — per week, per month or per year. You can do it on your own, or you can sign up for a reading challenge at Goodreads, Bookish, BookRiot, Popsugar or Reddit. (The nice thing about the Goodreads challenge is that it’s not tied to a Jan. 1 start date; it’s designed to begin at any point during the year.) Don’t be too ambitious: Start small, with manageable goals, and increase them slowly as you go along.
Commit to variety. You want to look forward to your reading time every day, so don’t make every book you pick up an intellectual challenge. Pick lighter titles some of the time, and mix fiction, nonfiction and poetry.
A Little Motivation
Create a (semi) perfect reading environment. One important step on your road to reading better is to find or create an ideal reading environment. A great chair and good lighting come first, of course, but after that, you have to consider the mood-killers of reading. You know what your biggest distractions are, so be ruthlessly honest with yourself about what you need to do to set yourself up for success. If the lure of your phone will tempt you, stash it where you can’t see it (and mute your notifications so that you can’t hear it, either). If you need to tune out chatter on your morning train or the drone of your roommate’s TV, consider noise-blocking headphones.

Related Reading
Quartz: In the time you spend on social media each year, you could read 200 books
That decision to start reading was one of the most important decisions in my life.

The Atlantic: The Adults Who Treat Reading Like Homework
More and more people are making reading goals that most of them will not meet. Here's why.

(3) Read More Deeply
To read more deeply--at a level that stimulates your imagination, the single most important thing to do is take your time. You can’t read deeply if you’re skimming. Set aside at least 15 minutes today to read your book and try this exercise:

Notice if you start to skim or skip sections. Then, backtrack. It can help to use your finger on the page to underline text as you go.
Keep a dictionary nearby. If you’re uncertain about the definition of any words, stop and look them up.
Actively reread. If something is confusing you, reread it. If it’s an especially knotty passage, try to read it aloud or express it in your own words. And if all else fails, mark the troublesome text in some way, whether you highlight it or affix a sticky note. It’s likely that you'll find clarification later in the book, and this way you will be able to come back to it.
Use a highlighter (or sticky notes). Mark the passages of your book that resonate with you. Perhaps the ideas fascinate you, or perhaps you’re struck by the author’s language. When you finish the book, return to those pages to see if you still feel the same way.
Summarize. At the end of your reading session, sum up, in your own words, what you’ve just read. (There’s a reason your teacher asked you questions after every chapter in high school!)

(4) Read More Critically
When you are reading deeply and critically, you should be thinking more often about the book being read; sharpening your deductive reasoning; teasing out connections between different books, and discovering parallels between books and current events.
* Stop and ask yourself questions. Here are a few to try: “What is the author trying to say?” “What is the point of this chapter?” “Could the author have used better examples to buttress her argument here?” “What techniques is the author using to build so much suspense?
* Consider whether you agree with the book or disagree with it. Try to separate your personal beliefs and biases from the book. What questions do you have about what you’re reading? What issues is the book making you rethink or reconsider?
* Think about what makes good writing. It doesn’t matter what kind of book you’re reading — historical nonfiction, a classic, popular fiction.
* Take it Further: does note-taking point to related reading? A a biography of the novelist whose book I'm reading? a nonfiction book about the time period in which the novel takes place? Get ideas by examining the author’s sources in the bibliography and notes (also check out this https://www.nytimes.com/2017/04/15/opinion/sunday/the-joy-of-hate-reading.html).

(5) Explore Different Formats
Variety is the spice of reading, right? There’s a great deal of debate over the “best” way to read a book, but there’s no conclusive scientific evidence about any of it. So mix things up. Perhaps start by trying to read out loud, or by asking someone to read a chapter to you. Or turn from print to audio or digital versions of the same story.

Being open to different formats expands your reading possibilities. Having options means you’ll always have a book at your fingertips. Take a break from your current book format to try one of these options:

* Use your cell phone for good. Get a reading app — like Kindle or Overdrive — and download your book digitally. Now, when you’re stuck with time on your hands, spend that time reading instead of skimming through social media.
* Try an audiobook. The audio version of a book can be just as good as print, unless you’re multitasking.
* Mix & match formats. Sync your devices: Listen to a book for a few chapters, then read it digitally for a while, or vice versa.

(6) Read More Socially
Reading may be a solitary endeavor, but once we’re done with a book, most of us want to do the same thing: talk to other people about what we loved, what we hated, what we didn’t understand. No matter where you are in the book you are currently reading, today’s the day to find a place to talk about it.

There are many ways to do that:

* Join an online book club. Unless you’re reading a currently popular book, it’s unlikely you’ll find a local in-person book club to discuss it. But that shouldn’t deter you. You’ll find literally thousands of book clubs on Goodreads, Facebook and other social media sites.
( Find your author on social media. Stephen King, for example, often talks about what he’s reading and what he recommends on Twitter, and so do many other authors; many of them invite lively discussion of books. If you can, try to find the author of your book on Twitter, Instagram or Facebook and see what type of conversation he or she is leading.
* Join a local book club or discussion group about your book. If you don’t know of one, call your local library — they will know about the book groups in your area. Hearing what other people think about a book helps expand your own ideas about it.

(7) Enhance Your Post-Book Experience

Here are some simple steps you can take to stay engaged with books, authors and the subjects you’re learning about.

Start a reading journal or reading log. Seeing a list of what you have read will help you branch out. Some people keep a reading log for years.
Create a future book journal. When you hear about a book that interests you, jot down the title. … [more]
advice  connecting_the_dots  critical_thinking  cultural_conversations  deep_learning  goal-setting  howto  questions  reading  self-betterment  self-improvement 
august 2019
Meagan Prins: ‘Think about and define your values’
August 5, 2019 | The Globe and Mail| KARL MOORE AND MORGAN DAVIS
SPECIAL TO THE GLOBE AND MAIL.

The best piece of advice I’ve ever received is to be “intentional,” and take the time to think hard about the role you want to play in the world. It’s so easy to find yourself stuck in a routine, working in a job that doesn’t put you on track to achieve your long-term goals. It’s important to think about and define your values to understand what you want to accomplish in the long run.
advice  alumni  IFC  intentionality  life-changing  McGill  values  women 
august 2019
13D / Our Approach
We are "Foxhogs".
The story of the fox and the hedgehog has been told in many forms through the ages, but the essence of it is always the same. The fox evades his attackers in a variety of inventive but exhausting ways, while the hedgehog adopts one tried and trusted strategy—hunkering down and letting its spikes do the work.

In the words of Greek poet Archilochus: “The fox knows many things, but the hedgehog knows one big thing.” Discussions of the hedgehog and the fox often come down to whether it’s better to be one or the other. But in a world that rewards expertise and the groundbreaking insights that come from the clash of domains, we need to be both. 13D is both.
foxes  hedgehogs  investment_research  investors 
august 2019
Opinion: Toronto flooded. What else is new? - The Globe and Mail
GLENN MCGILLIVRAY
CONTRIBUTED TO THE GLOBE AND MAIL
PUBLISHED 21 HOURS AGO
climate_change  extreme_weather_events  floods  Toronto 
august 2019
Bagehot by James Grant — an engaging biography of a purveyor of punditry
August 2, 2019 | Financial Times | by John Plender

Bagehot: The Life and Times of the Greatest Victorian, by James Grant, WW Norton, RRP£19.99/$28.95, 368 pages
19th_century  biographies  books  book_reviews  economics  financial_crises  financial_history  journalists  magazines  paradoxes  politicaleconomy  pundits  Victorian  Walter_Bagehot 
august 2019
Family offices are diving into new markets
August 1, 2019 | Financial Times | by Gillian Tett.

Once, property advisers mainly sold malls to developers, retail groups or banks. Now, however, there is rising demand from family offices. The new owner of Water Tower Place was said to have experience acquiring and managing other “trophy quality, grocery-anchored shopping centers” in the US.

As the Fed and other central banks loosen monetary policy, private pools of capital are searching for ever-more innovative ways to earn returns. ....It is not easy to monitor such financial flows with precision, since the family office sector — which is estimated to control almost $6tn in assets — is highly secretive. However, financiers say that a shift is under way. A few decades ago, the sector (like most asset managers) put most of its money in public bond and equity markets, with a smaller allocation to real estate.

Then investing in hedge funds became all the rage. But a survey conducted late last year by UBS bank and Campden Wealth suggests just 5.7 per cent of family office assets now sit in hedge funds, sharply down from recent years. Meanwhile, the allocation to public markets is also falling, with just 28 per cent in equities and 16 per cent in bonds.

At the same time, investments in private equity and real estate have risen to account for 22 per cent and 17 per cent respectively. This trend seems set to intensify.....“Family offices continue to re-evaluate traditional approaches to investing [with] accelerating interest in making direct investments in real estate and operating businesses.”

This means that family offices are no longer just investing in private equity funds (which are already bloated with cash), but increasingly cutting direct deals. ...The more that elite private pools of capital find juicy returns outside public markets, the more this risks fuelling wealth gaps. After all, most non-elite investors remain stuck in public markets and bank deposits, exposed to the vagaries of low interest rates.

This return gap may be going largely unnoticed now, because private markets are so opaque. However, the difference is likely to grow.
family_office  Gillian_Tett  trends  opacity 
august 2019
A Recession Is Coming (Eventually). Here’s Where You’ll See It First. - The New York Times
By Ben Casselman
July 28, 2019

Another recession will come eventually. Fortunately, economic expansions, unlike coin-flip streaks, usually provide some hints about when they are nearing their end — if you know where to look. Below is a guide to some of the indicators that have historically done the best job of sounding the alarm.

Indicator 1: The Unemployment Rate
What to watch for: Rapid increases, even from a low level.
What it’s saying: All clear.

Indicator 2: The Yield Curve
What to watch for: Interest rates on 10-year Treasury bonds falling below those on three-month bonds. (It has already happened.)
What it’s saying: Storm warning.

Indicator 3: The ISM Manufacturing Index
What to watch for: The index falling below about 45 for an extended period.
What it's saying: Mostly cloudy.

Indicator 4: Consumer Sentiment
What to watch for: Declines of 15 percent or more over a year.
What it's saying: Partly cloudy.

Indicator 5: Choose Your Favorite

* Temporary staffing levels: Temp workers are, by definition, flexible — companies hire them when they need help quickly and get rid of them when demand dries up. That makes them a good measure of business sentiment.
* The quits rate: When workers are confident in the economy, they are more likely to quit voluntarily.
* Residential building permits: The housing market has frequently led the economy both into and out of recessions. That has made building permits — which are generally issued several weeks before construction begins — one of the best historical indicators of economic activity.
* Auto sales: After houses, cars are the most expensive thing most families buy.
consumer_confidence  economics  forecasting  indices  interim  lagging_indicators  leading_indicators  manufacturers  recessions  unemployment  warning_signs  yield_curve 
august 2019
The Meadoway: 16 km stretch of urban park will connect downtown to Scarborough | CBC News
Posted: Apr 11, 2018 | CBC News | by Ramna Shahzad.

The park will connect 4 ravines, 15 parks and 34 neighbourhoods.

A 16-kilometre long stretch of land slated to be transformed into a large urban park called The Meadoway is "a bold vision," Mayor John Tory said on Wednesday.

The park, which will stretch north from the Don River Ravine in downtown Toronto all the way to Rouge National Urban Park in Scarborough, will allow pedestrians and cyclists to travel the entire length without ever leaving the park. .......The city is working with the Toronto and Region Conservation Authority (TRCA) and the W. Garfield Weston Foundation to transform a barren power corridor into the green space over the next seven years.

The entire project is expected to cost around $85 million. The W. Garfield Weston Foundation has pledged a total of $25 million to support it over the coming months.

"[The park] serves as another example of what can be accomplished when we work together with public, private and philanthropic partners,"
bicycles  cycling  Don_River  habitats  landscapes  linearity  Meadoway  neighbourhoods  outdoors  parks  philanthropy  public_spaces  ravines  Rouge_Park  Scarborough  Toronto  TRCA  urban  wilderness  green_spaces 
july 2019
Makerspaces under pressure to revamp business models
July 29, 2019 The Globe and Mail | BRENDA BOUW, SPECIAL TO THE GLOBE AND MAIL.
3-D  bankruptcies  business_models  hacks  innovation  manufacturers  start_ups  Makerspace 
july 2019
FT business books of the month: August edition
July 30, 2109 | | Financial Times | by Isabel Berwick, Emma Jacobs, Jonathan Moules, Andrew Hill.
booklists  books  summertime 
july 2019
Work smarter, not harder. Here’s how
July 29, 2019 | The Globe and Mail | by KIRA VERMOND, SPECIAL TO THE GLOBE AND MAIL.

Suzanne Andrew, a freelance writer in Vancouver, took stock of her growing number of deadlines. One client wanted her to complete 26 profiles – articles that describe an individual or organization – in one month.

“I love writing profiles, but when I looked at the amount of work, it felt crushing,” she says.

Rather than brace herself for 18-hour days, all-nighters and inevitable burnout, Ms. Andrew took a different approach. She paused and then came up with a game plan.

“I’d worked as a project manager in the past and found that what worked best when managing other people was to create work-back schedules and milestone deadlines,” she says. “As a freelancer I was used to simply working to deadline, but realized I could make things easier and less stressful if I acted as my own project manager.”.....Ms. Andrew created a work-back schedule that outlined exactly how many interviews she had to conduct, plus a daily writing quota to meet the overall deadline. Once she met her daily target, she could stop work for the day and rest.

Here are a few pointers.....

1. WORK WITH YOUR ATTENTION LEVELS
Not every moment of the day is created equal when it comes to feeling sharp and productive. Our brains can only handle so much focused work time. Everyone has three levels of attention: proactive, active and inactive.

Feeling proactive? You’re in the zone: Take advantage of those times each day. Active times are best spent on less focused tasks like addressing emails or making a phone call.

And those inactive times? “Your brain is cooked,” You should probably be taking a mental break, going for a walk or getting a cup of coffee. Even just doing low-priority, repetitive work like filing is a good idea.”
Work with your brain’s energy levels. Don’t fight them and push yourself through those inactive times.

2. PLAN THE NIGHT BEFORE
Don’t allow your inbox become your to-do list. Instead, take 10 minutes at the end of the workday and create tomorrow’s action plan. What’s most important? What must get done? The next morning, look at that list and work on the most vital tasks before even thinking about firing up e-mail.

3. THINK LIKE A SMOKER
Pay attention to the way smokers take their breaks: They leave the building, go outside and even socialize.
“I’m a big believer in quality breaks,” she says. “How you take your break is as important as [taking] a break.”Get up. Move. Take in some fresh air and talk to people. You’ll come back more refreshed and proactive.

4. TRY THE POMODORO TECHNIQUE
....a productivity method, developed by a business consultant named Francesco Cirillo in the 1980s. (Pomodoro means “tomato” in Italian, a nod to old-school, plastic timers shaped like tomatoes.) The method dictates that you set a timer for a short amount of time – say, 25 or 30 minutes – and then focus on one task without interruption. Once the timer goes off, take a short break. Then, if needed, you do it again. Commit to going deep for 25 - 90 minutes (jk: sustained inquiry),” “It’s amazing when we consciously choose to do one thing, and one thing only, how much we get done.”
action_plans  attention  attention_spans  best_practices  focus  lists  monotasking  Pomodoro  preparation  priorities  productivity  project_management  slack_time  sustained_inquiry  thinking_backwards  thinking_deliberatively  timeouts  timing  to-do  work-back_schedules  work_smarter 
july 2019
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