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Jake LaMotta, ‘Raging Bull’ in and Out of the Ring, Dies at 95 - The New York Times
By RICHARD GOLDSTEINSEPT. 20, 2017
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obituaries  boxing  '50s  movies  films  '40s 
september 2017 by jerryking
Black Kudos • Claude Brown Claude Brown (February 23, 1937 -...
Claude Brown

Claude Brown (February 23, 1937 - February 2, 2002) is the author of Manchild in the Promised Land, published to critical acclaim in 1965, which tells the story of his coming of age during the 1940s and 1950s in Harlem. He also published Children of Ham (1976).
writers  nostalgia  African-Americans  Harlem  New_York_City  '50s  lawyers  '40s  coming-of-age 
october 2015 by jerryking
The Courthouse Ring - The New Yorker
AUGUST 10, 2009 ISSUE

The Courthouse Ring
Atticus Finch and the limits of Southern liberalism.

BY MALCOLM GLADWELL
the_South  race_relations  '50s  Malcolm_Gladwell 
july 2015 by jerryking
Ben E. King, singer of ‘Stand By Me,’ dies at age 76 - The Globe and Mail
WILLIAM GRIMES — The New York Times News Service
Published Friday, May. 01 2015,

King left the Drifters in 1960 and embarked on a successful solo career. “Spanish Harlem,” written by Leiber with Phil Spector, reached the Top 10 that year. “Stand by Me,” which King helped write, reached the Top 10 in 1961 and again in 1986, when it was used in the soundtrack of the Rob Reiner film of the same name.

“Because he recorded the work of so many great songwriters, his own songwriting is often overlooked,” Emerson said. “But he co-wrote ‘There Goes My Baby,’ and ‘Stand by Me’ originated with him.” He was also the principal writer of “Dance With Me.”

Rolling Stone ranked “Stand by Me” 122nd on its list of the 500 greatest songs. In 1999 BMI, the music licensing organization, announced that it was the fourth-most-recorded song of the 20th century, having been played more than seven million times on radio and television.
singers  obituaries  African-Americans  '60s  '50s  music  music_labels  soundtracks  songwriters 
may 2015 by jerryking
The Death of Soul’s King: remembering Sam Cooke 50 years after his death - WSJ
By MARC MYERS
Dec. 9, 2014

What has survived are Cooke’s hits, including “You Send Me,” “Cupid” and “Another Saturday Night.” All remain relevant and continue to be covered by contemporary artists. Overlooked, however, are two of Cooke’s other big achievements: In the late 1950s and early ’60s, the singer-songwriter pioneered romantic soul and created a formula for success that helped Motown and other black-owned labels cross over to the pop charts with original music.

In the late 1950s, Cooke was the first black singer-songwriter to figure out how to parlay male vulnerability into sweet pleas that resonated with integrated teen audiences.
soul  killings  anniversaries  '60s  '50s  singers  music_labels  songwriters  African-Americans  Sam_Cooke  music  Motown  black-owned 
december 2014 by jerryking
The Grand Strategy Obama Needs
SEPT. 10, 2014 | NYTimes.com | Vali R. Nasr.

What’s missing is a grand strategy — a road map not just for managing two crises but for ending them....But Eisenhower had a larger goal — not upsetting the delicate balance of power in the Cold War. Above all, he sought to avoid greater conflict, especially when he was trying to start arms control talks with Moscow.

In other words, he had a long-term global perspective.

By contrast, American policy today sees the world in fragments — ISIS in Iraq and Syria, Russia in Ukraine. But those crises have something important in common: Both trace to political fragmentation in weak states living within unsettled borders. That leaves those states prone to internal dissent, and America’s recent minimalist posture has given these brewing troubles room to explode into crises....American grand strategy should identify these weak countries before they turn on themselves; bolster their political mechanisms for living together in pluralism; declare our unyielding opposition to any outside forces that would seek to divide them. America’s military strength could assure the third part. The rest is work for our political and diplomatic experts.
Obama  Ukraine  strategy  geopolitics  '50s  Middle_East  Russia  strategic_thinking  nation_building  failed_states  long-term  weak_states  diplomacy  grand_strategy  roadmaps  Non-Integrating_Gap  Dwight_Eisenhower  crisis  Vali_Nasr 
september 2014 by jerryking
Joseph Epstein: What's Missing in Ferguson, Mo. - WSJ
Aug. 12, 2014 | WSJ | By JOSEPH EPSTEIN.

The black family—the absence of fathers—is the problem. The old dead analyses, the pretty panaceas, are paraded. Yet nothing new is up for discussion. Discussion itself is off the table. Except when Bill Cosby, Thomas Sowell or Shelby Steele and a few others have dared to speak about the pathologies at work—and for doing so, these black figures are castigated.

President Obama, as leader of all the people, is not well positioned for the job of leading the black population that finds itself mired in despond. Someone is needed who commands the respect of his or her people, and the admiration of that vast—I would argue preponderate—number of middle-class whites who understand that progress for blacks means progress for the entire country.

The older generation of civil-rights leaders proved its mettle through physical and moral courage. The enemy was plain—rear-guard segregationists of the old South—and the target was clear: wrongful laws that had to be, and were, rescinded. The morality of the matter was all on these leaders' side. In Little Rock, in Montgomery, in Selma and elsewhere, they put their lives on the line. And they won.

The situation today for a civil-rights leader is not so clear, and in many ways more complex. After the victories half a century ago, civil rights may be a misnomer. Economics and politics and above all culture are now at the heart of the problem. Blacks largely, and inexplicably, remain pledged to a political party whose worn-out ideas have done little for them while claiming much. Slipping off the too-comfortable robes of victimhood is essential, as is discouraging everything in ghetto culture that has dead-end marked all over it.
Ferguson  African-Americans  leaders  leadership  Michael_Brown  '60s  '50s  NAACP  MLK  civil_rights  fatherhood  dysfunction  victimhood  thug_code  family_breakdown 
august 2014 by jerryking
There Are Many Things That Are Missing in Ferguson — Letters to the Editor - WSJ
Aug. 21, 2014 | WSJ | Letter to the editor by Richard Klitzberg
Joseph Epstein's poignant comments in "What's Missing in Ferguson, Mo." (op-ed, Aug. 13) compare and contrast today's absence of black leadership with the '50s and '60s when great and historic black leaders rose to give the civil rights era its direction. The real question from Mr. Epstein should not concern riots in Missouri or what and how much blacks have been given by government, or what their current leaders have accomplished for them, but why they need "leaders" in the first place. ...The black community doesn't need today's leaders who are completely self-absorbed. It needs values and standards, goals and objectives—all of which are within their personal control. And they need to aim high. Doing that, even if one doesn't quite make it, leaves one a long way above where he was.
Ferguson  Michael_Brown  leadership  leaders  African-Americans  ethnic_communities  personal_control  self-absorbed  values  standards  goals  objectives  '60s  '50s  civil_rights 
august 2014 by jerryking
carnage and culture: Jason Whitlock: Taylor's death a grim reminder for us all
November 30, 2007 | FOXSports.com | Jason Whitlock.
HBO did a fascinating documentary on Little Rock Central High School, the Arkansas school that required the National Guard so that nine black kids could attend in the 1950s. Fifty years later, the school is one of the nation's best in terms of funding and educational opportunities. It's 60 percent black and located in a poor black community.

Watch the documentary and ask yourself why nine poor kids in the '50s risked their lives to get a good education and a thousand poor black kids today ignore the opportunity that is served to them on a platter.

Blame drugs, blame Ronald Reagan, blame George Bush, blame it on the rain or whatever. There's only one group of people who can change the rotten, anti-education, pro-violence culture our kids have adopted. We have to do it.

The "keepin' it real" mantra of hip hop is in direct defiance to evolution. There's always someone ready to tell you you're selling out if you move away from the immature and dangerous activities you used to do, you're selling out if you speak proper English, embrace education, dress like a grown man, do anything mainstream.

The Black KKK is enforcing the same crippling standards as its parent organization. It wants to keep black men in their place — uneducated, outside the mainstream and six feet deep.
NFL  self-help  hip_hop  killings  violence  African-Americans  thug_code  dysfunction  documentaries  HBO  immaturity  integration  students  '50s  education  civil_rights  high_schools 
august 2012 by jerryking
Charles Murray on the New American Divide - WSJ.com
JANUARY 21, 2012 | WSJ | By CHARLES MURRAY

The New American Divide
The ideal of an 'American way of life' is fading as the working class falls further away from institutions like marriage and religion and the upper class becomes more isolated. Charles Murray on what's cleaving America, and why.

When Americans used to brag about "the American way of life"—a phrase still in common use in 1960—they were talking about a civic culture that swept an extremely large proportion of Americans of all classes into its embrace. It was a culture encompassing shared experiences of daily life and shared assumptions about central American values involving marriage, honesty, hard work and religiosity.

Over the past 50 years, that common civic culture has unraveled. We have developed a new upper class with advanced educations, often obtained at elite schools, sharing tastes and preferences that set them apart from mainstream America. At the same time, we have developed a new lower class, characterized not by poverty but by withdrawal from America's core cultural institutions.
Charles_Murray  family_breakdown  marriage  religion  social_integration  social_classes  '50s  '60s  values  civics  underclass  cultural_institutions  social_fabric  whites  working_class  fault_lines  hard_work  disintegration  shared_consciousness  upper-income 
january 2012 by jerryking

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