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jerryking : '80s   77

Smalltown Boy — Bronski Beat’s 1984 hit was a heartfelt cry for liberation
September 29, 2019 | FT.com | Paul Gould.

Rejection and heartbreak are recurring staples of pop music, but every now and then a song turns the stuff of sadness into an irresistible dancefloor filler. One such song, mining an upbeat theme of liberation from a downbeat tale of homophobia, is Bronski Beat’s 1984 hit “Smalltown Boy”.
'80s  music  songs 
october 2019 by jerryking
Lee Iacocca, car executive, 1924-2019
July 2, 2019 | Financial Times | by Kenneth Gooding 14 HOURS AGO
'80s  automotive_industry  CEOs  Chrysler  Detroit  Ford  obituaries 
july 2019 by jerryking
Everybody Wants to Rule the World — Tears for Fears’ 1985 hit was the subject of a radical re-reading — FT.com
Ravi Ghosh APRIL 8, 2019

Tears for Fears’ 1985 hit “Everybody Wants to Rule the World” was a breakthrough for the English band, a worldwide success that topped the Billboard Hot 100 in the US and spent six weeks in the UK’s top five. Taken from their 1985 album Songs from the Big Chair, it epitomised the maturation of founding members Roland Orzabal and Curt Smith from relative low-liers in the mod revival band Graduate, to a globe-conquering synth-pop outfit. Thanks to a bigger, reverb-heavy sound which resonated worldwide, Songs from the Big Chair sold five million copies in the US alone.

They also became part of the “second British invasion” of the US — a new wave of acts who, thanks largely to MTV coverage, found favour among American audiences with their synth-based sounds and glossy videos. The invasion was spearheaded in 1981 by The Human League’s “Don’t You Want Me”, with bands such as Duran Duran following in their wake and Tears for Fears joining the party in the mid-1980s.

“Everybody Wants to Rule the World” emerged when singer and songwriter Roland Orzabal was in the studio sessions towards the end of recording Songs from the Big Chair and came up with a two-chord riff; the rest of the song, he later said, was “effortless”, though it did undergo some changes.
'80s  music  second_British_invasion  songs 
may 2019 by jerryking
Black Folk's Guide to Making Big Money in America
A primer on personal finance, business and real estate. It is truly comprehensive and a must read for anyone serious about improving their financial situation.
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First, Trower-Subira emphasizes the central importance of home ownership as a source of equity capital. He decried the usage of earned income and accumulated home equity to fuel (conspicuous) consumption binges. Trower-Subira got it right when he said that real estate should be the base asset for African Americans from which to build wealth. As long as you borrow against your home to acquire other, income producing assets, you are doing yourself a favor by pursuing homeownership.

Second, he stressed the importance of financial assets in building wealth. Trower-Subira puts forth a brilliant explanation of the types of assets that produce income and that African Americans in particular should endeavor to pursue (real estate is just one of several).

Third, Trower-Subira emphasizes the importance of continuing education combined with an asset-based approach to wealth building. Trower-Subira wrote in the context of his day, but now the game has shifted somewhat. That is not to say that the problems of his day are no more; indeed, many of the problems of his day still relentlessly follow the African American community, and in too many instances, the problem have actually gotten worse. Although we are presented with new opportunities, we also face new challenges- on top of the same old challenges that we have yet to vanquish.
'80s  advice  African-Americans  Amazon  books  business  home_ownership  mindsets  personal_finance  primers  real_estate  self-help  wealth_creation 
april 2019 by jerryking
James Ingram, a Hitmaking Voice of ’80s R&B, Is Dead at 66 - The New York Times
By Jon Caramanica
Jan. 29, 2019

James Ingram, whose voice — technically precise, crisp and reserved, yet full of audacious feeling — made him one of the defining singers of R&B in the 1980s, has died. He was 66.

Just as R&B’s “quiet storm” phase was peaking, Mr. Ingram was plucked from side-gig obscurity by the producer Quincy Jones to appear on his 1981 album, “The Dude.”
'80s  African-Americans  obituaries  R&B  singers  smooth_jazz 
january 2019 by jerryking
Christine Blasey Ford, Brett Kavanaugh forcing sexual assault reckoning
Kirsten Powers, Opinion columnist Published 4:00 a.m. ET Oct. 2, 2018
sexual_assault  '80s  women 
october 2018 by jerryking
The Future Is Dodgeball -
Nov. 5, 2017 | WSJ | By Andy Kessler.

Ben Rosen rambled on about getting in the middle of things at events, conferences and seminars. He said that at first nothing will make sense and all these balls will be flying across the room out of your reach. But eventually you’ll find yourself in the middle of the room and balls will start hitting you. Then you’ll know you’re inside....Turns out it was the best advice I would ever receive.

The thing about the future is that, as William Goldman wrote about screenwriting, “Nobody knows anything.” Everyone is an outsider, and it’s all up for grabs. Someone might have an opinion, but there are few facts. What you need are your own opinions about where the world is headed in any given industry: artificial intelligence, gene editing, autonomous trucks, marine salvage—whatever.

You need to go to places where the future is discussed. Every industry has these events. Make the time to go. And not only to hear keynoters billow hot air, but for the panel discussions where people disagree. The conversation spills out into the hallways between talks..... Barge in anyway. Remember, there are no facts, only opinions.

Walk up and talk to people. Ask what they do. They’re there because they want to learn something too. They will all ask you what you think. Come up with something fast, but don’t be too stubborn to change what you think as you learn more. During the personal-computer era I saw a guy, whom Bill Gates had just introduced, standing by himself after showcasing the first truly high-resolution videogame. I chatted him up and he has been a friend for life, showing me not only where technology is headed but the path it takes.

It’s not classic networking but a network of ideas. The goal is finding a new way to think, to filter news over time as the future takes shape in fits and starts. It never happens in a straight line. Hydraulic fracturing has been around and argued about since 1947. Anyone had a chance to study this future of unlocking natural gas and make a fortune. Same for artificial intelligence in 1956, e-commerce in 1979 and quantum computing in 1982.

The future doesn’t happen overnight. You just need to get inside it and let some of those balls whizzing by start to hit you. And you’ve got to do this in person. Most issues don’t show up online, let alone on Facebook or Twitter . It’s tough as a writer to admit that subtle nuances sometimes require face-to-face conversation.

It doesn’t matter if you’re 25, 45 or 65. The industry you pick to work in has more of a say in your success than your job description. Same for giving money away. If you want to fund Alzheimer’s research, you better find yourself at wonky conferences going toe-to-toe with doctors. Eventually, you’ll know more.

I met Jeff Bezos at a tech conference about a decade ago and mentioned that I had just self-published a book and used his Amazon Advantage program to sell it. He proceeded to grill me like a steak, asking what was wrong with it and what features he should add. I’m convinced he keeps winning because he enjoys being hit with dodgeballs. He famously left New York a retailing outsider with an idea to sell books. Balls whizzed by until they hit. He now has the ultimate inside view.

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“Play in traffic.”.....“It means that if you go push yourself out there and you see people and do things and participate and get involved, something happens,” he said. “Both of my great occasions in life happened by accident simply because I showed up.”“I tell people, just show up, get in the game, go play in traffic,” Mr. Plumeri said. “Something good will come of it, but you’ve got to show up.”
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Andy_Kessler  '80s  Wall_Street  Morgan_Stanley  Communicating_&_Connecting  conferences  panels  future  small_talk  face2face  independent_viewpoints  action-oriented  ice-breakers  advice  playing_in_traffic  industry_expertise  Jeff_Bezos  straight-lines  think_differently 
november 2017 by jerryking
The Fashion Outlaw Dapper Dan
JUNE 3, 2017 | The New York Times | By BARRY MICHAEL COOPER.

Twenty-five years after luxury labels sued his Harlem
boutique out of existence, Gucci looks to him for inspiration......Things have come full circle. Litigation by luxury brands ran Dapper Dan’s Boutique out of business in the ’90s, and now here comes a major fashion house trying to grab the attention of a generation steeped in hip-hop by finding inspiration in a onetime fashion outlaw...... last week after Gucci unveiled a jacket that looked very much like one he designed nearly three decades ago for the Olympic sprinter Diane Dixon.

The fur-lined piece with balloon sleeves created by Mr. Day in the 1980s made use of the Louis Vuitton logo without the brand’s permission. The new Gucci jacket, designed by Gucci’s creative director, Alessandro Michele, remakes the Dapper Dan jacket, but with the interlocking double-G Gucci logo in place of the Louis Vuitton markings......Gucci [now] acknowledges its debt to the designer......In addition to Gucci’s recent salutation, the Museum of Modern Art plans to include Mr. Day’s work in its fall show “Items.” In an email, MoMA’s senior curator of architecture and design, Paola Antonelli, called Mr. Day a “trailblazer” who “showed even the guardians of the original brands the power of creative appropriation, the new life that an authentically ‘illicit’ use could inject into a stale logo, as well as the commercial potential of a stodgy monogram’s walk on the hip-hop side.”.....“What Dap did was take what those major fashion labels were doing and made them better,” said the rapper Darold Ferguson, Jr., who goes by the stage name ASAP Ferg and whose father, Darold Sr., worked at the boutique in the ’80s. “He taught them how to use their designs in a much more effective way. Dap curated hip-hop culture.”

Steve Stoute, the chief executive of the marketing firm Translation, said: “I think what Dap did, he actually taught an entire generation how to engage with luxury brands. Luxury brands, at that point, were not for us. They didn’t even have sizing for black people. So every time I walk into Louis Vuitton to buy a pair of sneakers, or buy a pair of pants in my size, I know they’re only doing it because of Dapper Dan.”....experiences with poverty growing up [crummy shoes] gave him an understanding of how clothes reflect social status.... the need to dress to impress is part of a generational mind-set for many black men who grew up in Harlem......Clothes designing sounds fascinating, but it’s hard work. Folks don’t realize that there are limitations in the body form. We’re humans: We have arms, legs, chest. The exciting part of designing clothes is that you can be really creative within the context of those limitations.”.......Samira Nasr, the fashion director for Elle magazine, likened Mr. Day’s work to that of the innovative hip-hop D.J.s of the era, such as Jason Mizell, a client of Mr. Day’s. Mr. Mizell, who died in 2002, created beats for Run-DMC under the name Jam Master Jay. “Sampling was taking existing music and slicing it to recreate new sounds for original lyrics,” Ms. Nasr wrote in an email. “Dap was sampling in a way. He was taking existing fabrications and breathing new life and beauty into them.”
litigation  luxury  brands  clothing_labels  Gucci  Harlem  stylish  mens'_clothing  African-Americans  New_York_City  sampling  streetwise  '80s  '90s  inspiration  hip_hop  fashion  outlaws  design  retailers  knockoffs  copycats  creative_appropriation  underground_economy  crack_cocaine 
june 2017 by jerryking
Trump and the problem with the new normal
Twenty years ago, Nasa scientists asked the sociologist Diane Vaughan to study the causes of the 1986 Challenger space shuttle disaster. Vaughan responded by developing a concept she called "the norma...
Gillian_Tett  Donald_Trump  NASA  deviance  '80s  normality  White_House  complacency  normalization  tipping_points  normalization_of_deviance  new_normal 
may 2017 by jerryking
Jazz Singer Al Jarreau Dies at 76 - WSJ
Associated Press
Feb. 12, 2017

The Milwaukee native won seven Grammys over the course of his half-century in music. His biggest single was 1981’s “We’re in This Love Together” from the album “Breakin’ Away.” Mr. Jarreau was also a vocalist on the all-star 1985 track, “We Are the World,” and sang the theme to TV’s “Moonlighting.”

Al Jarreau performing at the Rock in Rio music festival on Sept. 27, 2015, in Rio de Janeiro. Mr. Jarreau, 76, died Sunday in Los Angeles.

He is one of the few artists to have won Grammys in three separate categories—jazz, pop and R&B. Time Magazine once called him the “greatest jazz singer alive.”
singers  jazz  obituaries  African-Americans  '80s  R&B  pop 
february 2017 by jerryking
John Wetton, Rocker With King Crimson and Asia, Dies at 67 - The New York Times
By DANIEL E. SLOTNIKJAN. 31, 2017
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'80s  music  obituaries 
february 2017 by jerryking
The Politics of Cowardice - The New York Times
David Brooks JAN. 27, 2017

Trump has changed the way the Republican Party sees the world. Republicans used to have a basic faith in the dynamism and openness of the free market. Now the party fears openness and competition.

In the summer of 2015, according to a Pew Research Center poll, Republicans said free trade deals had been good for the country by 51 to 39 percent. By the summer of 2016, Republicans said those deals had been bad for America by 61 percent to 32 percent.

It’s not that the deals had changed, or reality. It was that Donald Trump became the Republican nominee and his dark fearfulness became the party’s dark fearfulness. In this case fear is not a reaction to the world. It is a way of seeing the world. It propels your reactions to the world.
cowardice  David_Brooks  Donald_Trump  openness  Ronald_Reagan  '80s  GOP  FDR  optimism  free_markets  fear  threat_perception 
january 2017 by jerryking
The Life of a Song: 1999
January 1, 2017 | Financial Times | David Cheal
'80s  songs  music  lyrics  Prince 
january 2017 by jerryking
Ron Glass, Who Played a Dapper Detective on ‘Barney Miller,’ Dies at 71 - The New York Times
By CHRISTOPHER MELENOV. 27, 2016
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obituaries  African-Americans  actors  '70s  '80s  nostalgia  NYPD 
november 2016 by jerryking
Moonlight bravely aims to create a fuller picture of black masculinity - The Globe and Mail
ANDRAY DOMISE
Special to The Globe and Mail Last updated: Thursday, Oct. 27, 2016

Moonlight is an undeniably beautiful coming-of-age story told in three parts, adapted from playwright Tarell McCraney’s In Moonlight Black Boys Look Blue. To say it tells the story of a young man growing up is true, and to say this film is a cinematic achievement is also true, but both are understatements. In film, literature and especially the evening news, black masculinity is rarely explored as more than a pathology – gnarled and twisted by crime, poverty and broken families. Through striking visuals and muted, simmering performances from the cast, Jenkins diffracts a broad range of black stereotypes and masterfully reunites them with their missing layers of humanity.
films  TIFF  movies  African-Americans  masculinity  Andray_Domise  Moonlight  coming-of-age  '80s  multidimensional  Miami  stereotypes  think_threes 
october 2016 by jerryking
Rod Temperton, Who Wrote ‘Thriller’ for Michael Jackson and ‘Boogie Nights,’ Dies - The New York Times
By WILLIAM GRIMESOCT. 5, 2016
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obituaries  songwriters  '70s  '80s 
october 2016 by jerryking
Bill Nunn, Who Played Radio Raheem in ‘Do the Right Thing,’ Dies at 63 -
SEPT. 24, 2016 | The New York Times | By LIAM STACK.

Bill Nunn, a versatile actor best known for playing the role of Radio Raheem, the boombox-toting neighborhood philosopher killed by police officers in Spike Lee’s 1989 film “Do the Right Thing,” died on Saturday in Pittsburgh. He was 63.....The first major acting role for Mr. Nunn, the son of a well-known professional football scout, was in the 1988 film “School Daze,” also written and directed by Mr. Lee. The next year brought the critically acclaimed “Do the Right Thing,” in which he played the iconic Radio Raheem, who carries a boombox blaring Public Enemy’s “Fight the Power” through the streets of the Bedford-Stuyvesant area of Brooklyn on the hottest day of summer.....He was a frequent collaborator of Mr. Lee and also appeared in his films “Mo’ Better Blues” and “He Got Game.” Mr. Lee referred to him on Saturday as "my dear friend, my dear Morehouse brother.” They both attended Morehouse College in Atlanta.....Mr. Nunn became a popular character actor after “Do the Right Thing” and appeared in a variety of films, including “New Jack City,” “Sister Act” and the “Spider-Man” trilogy by the director Sam Raimi.
actors  obituaries  African-Americans  Spike_Lee  Bill_Nunn  movies  '80s  '90s  1989 
september 2016 by jerryking
Atul Gawande on Peter Gabriel’s ‘Solsbury Hill’ - WSJ
Aug. 23, 2016

Peter Gabriel’s “Solsbury Hill” over and over on my turntable.

I’d only just discovered the song, though it had come out six years earlier in the U.S. Gabriel wrote the song, at least partly, about a breakup of his own—leaving Genesis as the band’s lead singer. But the song isn’t some mopey ballad. It’s about enduring pain for the sake of something better.
Atul_Gawande  music  bouncing_back  romantic_love  '80s  breakups 
august 2016 by jerryking
Life of a Song: Beat It
October 31-November 1, 2015 | Financial Times| Marcia Crawford
Michael_Jackson  '80s  music  MTV  Quincy_Jones  entertainment  crossover 
november 2015 by jerryking
The test of true political leadership is to risk change - The Globe and Mail
BRIAN MULRONEY
Contributed to The Globe and Mail
Published Thursday, May. 28 2015

The most essential ingredient for any “Big Idea,” however, is leadership.

Leadership that not only anticipates the need for change but is determined to implement change. Not in pursuit of popularity but to serve the national interest.

The test of true leadership hinges on judgments between risk and reward.

Change of any kind requires risk, political risk. It can and will generate unpopularity from those who oppose change. The choice for Canada or the United Kingdom in a fast-changing global environment is either to adapt quickly and take advantage of the changes happening or watch from the sidelines....As Reinhold Niebuhr reminded us: “Nothing worth doing is completed in our lifetime; therefore, we must be saved by hope. Nothing fine or beautiful or good makes complete sense in any immediate context of history; therefore, we must be saved by faith.”(jk: the importance of having a long-term vision & exhibiting faith in pursuing it).

It is in this perspective that great and controversial questions of public policy must be considered.

History tends to focus on the builders, the deciders, the leaders – because they are the men and women whose contributions have shaped the destiny of their nations, here and around the world.

From the bloodied sands of Afghanistan to the snows and waters of the High Arctic, the Canada of 50 years from now will be defined by the leadership we are given today.
Brian_Mulroney  speeches  Oxford  leadership  politicians  Cold_War  9/11  NAFTA  '80s  history  leaders  risks  transformational  courage  political_risk  fast-changing  free-trade  public_policy 
may 2015 by jerryking
Respected businessman Purdy Crawford dies at 82 - The Globe and Mail
JANET MCFARLAND
The Globe and Mail
Published Tuesday, Aug. 12 2014,
obituaries  lawyers  CEOs  '80s 
august 2014 by jerryking
‘Space Oddity’ David Bowie’s Way, and Newer Takes - NYTimes.com
By VAL HALLER
Published: October 22, 2013

What do the astronauts Scott Carpenter and Chris Hadfield, the actors Sandra Bullock and George Clooney, the musicians David Bowie and Billy Corgan, and a sixth grader from Colorado have in common? Oddly, space. The stars’ stories aligned for me in recent headlines, just as I set out to feature David Bowie’s “Space Oddity” as this week’s cover song. “Ground Control to Major Tom …” was written in 1969 and has been covered by many, including Smashing Pumpkins’ Billy Corgan, and again last May by Mr. Hadfield of Canada, who performed it from space aboard the International Space Station. My ode to space also honors Mr. Carpenter, who died Oct. 10; Ms. Bullock and Mr. Clooney’s new movie “Gravity”; and 11-year-old Michal Bodzianowski whose microgravity beer-making theory won a place-in-space national competition.
David_Bowie  space  '70s  '80s 
october 2013 by jerryking
The Conservative Mind - NYTimes.com
by DAVID BROOKS
September 24, 2012

In the mid-1980s, the conservative movement had two branches: (a)
economic conservatives who spent a lot of time worrying about the way government intrudes upon economic liberty. They upheld freedom as their highest political value. They admired risk-takers. They worried that excessive government would create a sclerotic nation with a dependent populace. And (b), traditional conservatives, intellectual heirs to Edmund Burke, Russell Kirk, Clinton Rossiter and Catholic social teaching who didn’t see society as a battleground between government and the private sector. Instead, the traditionalist wanted to preserve a society that functioned as a harmonious ecosystem, in which the different layers were nestled upon each other: individual, family, company, neighborhood, religion, city government and national government.

Recently the blogger Rod Dreher linked to Kirk’s essay, “Ten Conservative Principles,” which gives the flavor of this brand of traditional conservatism. This kind of conservative cherishes custom, believing that the individual is foolish but the species is wise. It is usually best to be guided by precedent.

This conservative believes in prudence on the grounds that society is complicated and it’s generally best to reform it steadily but cautiously. Providence moves slowly but the devil hurries.

The two conservative tendencies lived in tension. But together they embodied a truth that was put into words by the child psychologist John Bowlby, that life is best organized as a series of daring ventures from a secure base.

The economic conservatives were in charge of the daring ventures that produced economic growth. The traditionalists were in charge of establishing the secure base — a society in which families are intact, self-discipline is the rule, children are secure and government provides a subtle hand.
David_Brooks  conservatism  growth  self-discipline  '80s  risk-taking  Edmund_Burke 
september 2012 by jerryking
The Weekend Interview With Paul Wolfowitz: The bin Laden Raid and the 'Virtues of Boldness' - WSJ.com
May 7| WSJ | By JAMES TARANTO.

In early September 2001, when he was deputy defense secretary, Paul Wolfowitz had breakfast at the Pentagon with a group of congressmen. His boss, Secretary Donald Rumsfeld, "was talking about the difficulties of predicting the future and the dangers of surprise," Mr. Wolfowitz recalls. "He said, 'You know, historically every time we think the threat has gone away, something comes along and surprises us.'" Mr. Wolfowitz's next meeting was interrupted by the news that a plane had hit the World Trade Center. Soon after, the Pentagon was evacuated after being hit by another hijacked aircraft.

Recent months have brought new surprises, as a wave of pro-democracy demonstrations has swept across the Arab world. Then, this week, President Obama announced that al Qaeda's leader was dead.

"The most striking thing is that even before Osama bin Laden was killed, he seemed largely irrelevant to the Arab Spring," Mr. Wolfowitz says.......The Arab Spring is a source of satisfaction to Mr. Wolfowitz, whose advocacy of democracy promotion as a "fundamental point of strategy" made him a demon figure for the antiwar left. .......Wolfowitz is now an outside critic of the administration in power......He says that pro-democracy sentiment in the Mideast caught President Obama by surprise as early as June 2009........ President Obama then cited the Iraq war and declared: "No system of government can or should be imposed [on] one nation by any other." To Mr. Wolfowitz, that is a straw man: "We did not go to war in Afghanistan or in Iraq to, quote, 'impose democracy.' We went to war in both places because we saw those regimes as a threat to the United States." Once they were overthrown, what else were we going to do? "No one argues that we should have imposed a dictatorship in Afghanistan having liberated the country. Similarly, we weren't about to impose a dictatorship in Iraq having liberated the country.".......World-wide, he says, democracy had been "in constant retreat" since the end of World War II. "If you looked around the world in 1981, you could say free, democratic institutions are a luxury that only the developed world enjoys—that is to say, the Anglo-Saxon world plus Western Europe plus Japan."

That began to change when Ronald Reagan came to Washington......The 1980s and '90s saw democratic advances elsewhere in East Asia as well as in Latin America, Eastern Europe and parts of sub-Saharan Africa.

By the end of the 20th century, the Arab Middle East had become an outlier—the least democratic region in the world........ has the Arab Spring occurred because of the Iraqi experience or in spite of it? When I ask Mr. Wolfowitz, he is hesitant: "It's a fascinating question, and one should probably simply . . . say it's in the category of the unknowable."........Yet Mr. Wolfowitz tempers his criticism with forbearance. "I think there's a learning curve," he says. "I think they're climbing up the learning curve." He takes encouragement in the president's "gutsy call" of sending men to finish off bin Laden in person rather than dispatching him with a missile. "Obama has just made the toughest decision of his presidency, arguably," Mr. Wolfowitz says. "It wasn't a simple decision. . . . He was in a position where he'd have to take responsibility for it if it went badly. It's gone well. I hope he's learned some of the virtues of boldness."
'80s  '90s  Arab_Spring  boldness  democracy  Donald_Rumsfeld  Middle_East  Obama  OBL  Paul_Wolfowitz  Ronald_Reagan  SecDef  straw_man  unknowables 
may 2011 by jerryking
Hall & Oates Finds New Fans With Old Mustache - WSJ.com
MARCH 12, 2010 | Wall Street Journal | b y JOHN JURGENSEN. Marketing a Famous Mustache
John Oates's facial hair makes a comeback of its own
music  music_industry  nostalgia  '80s 
march 2010 by jerryking
Those were the days;
06-25-2004 G & M RoB Magazine article by Doug Steiner on
the behaviour changes occurring in Bay Street among the brokerages.

First Marathon--led by Lawrence Bloomberg--and Gordon Capital, Connacher's secretive institutional boutique, were the Street's two toughest and savviest firms. First Marathon helped pioneer the discount brokerage concept in the early 1980s with Marathon Brown (which TD Bank bought in 1993). Bloomberg also perfected the "eat what you kill" compensation plan of fat bonuses for partners and employees who put together lucrative deals. It changed the payouts of almost every trader and investment banker on Bay Street, Howe Street and Ren Lvesque Boulevard....By 1995, the internet was changing trading forever. Disnat, E*TRADE Canada and other on-line dealers pushed the banks into flat-fee trading. Within three years, commissions for small trades tumbled 70%.

Yet Canada still had five stock exchanges: Vancouver, Alberta, Winnipeg, Toronto and Montreal. TSE president Rowland Fleming urged the exchanges to modernize, and the TSE closed its trading floor in 1997. His pugnacious leadership style helped persuade the dealers to remove both him and their own duplication of costs by consolidating the exchanges.

The culture was changing as well. Watering holes in Toronto, Montreal and Vancouver lost customers. Alcohol was no longer greasing the wheels of fortune. It was being replaced by MBAs, CFAs and hard work.
'80s  Bay_Street  behavioral_change  bourses  brokerage_houses  cultural_change  culture  Doug_Steiner  eat_what_you_kill  Gordon_Capital  hard_work  reminiscing  stockmarkets 
january 2009 by jerryking

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