recentpopularlog in

jerryking : 1967   26

(Sittin’ On) The Dock of the Bay — why Otis Redding’s biggest hit wasn’t actually a soul song
October 6, 2019 | FT.com | by Dan Einav.

“This is my first million seller,” announced Otis Redding to nervous-looking studio bosses in early December 1967. He was referring to his upcoming record, “(Sittin’ On) The Dock of the Bay”, which would indeed prove to be his first seven-figure release, eventually selling several times that amount. It would also be the last song he ever worked on. Two days after his second recording session on this breezy new ballad, he was dead — killed in a light-aircraft crash.

Executives at Atlantic Records cynically requested that a new song be released immediately. Redding’s collaborator and studio guitarist, and the song’s co-writer, Steve Cropper, was forced to set aside his grief and transform the rough cuts of “The Dock of the Bay” into a coherent track in just 24 hours. The result was an unassuming yet near-perfect composition that would serve as a fitting legacy for one of soul’s greatest talents.

But “The Dock of the Bay” wasn’t really a soul song in the conventional sense. In the summer of 1967, Redding immersed himself in The Beatles’ Sgt Pepper and was inspired by the band’s devotion to stress-testing the limits of popular music. “It’s time for me to change my music,” said Redding, as his wife and employers voiced concerns about his “poppy” new direction which took him away from his roots in soul and R&B.

That autumn Redding was recovering after a punishing touring schedule on a houseboat in Sausalito, across the bay from San Francisco, owned by promoter Bill Graham. It was there, idly watching the ferries sail to-and-from the harbour, that he conceived of that scene-setting first verse and the basic chords for “The Dock of the Bay”. Back in the studio, he asked Cropper to flesh out the melody and the brilliant, bittersweet lyrics.
'60s  1967  Beatles  music  Otis_Redding  pop_music  R&B  singers  songs  soul  Stax  tributes 
october 2019 by jerryking
The youth and confidence are gone, but 40 years later, Canada's still working - The Globe and Mail
ROY MACGREGOR
From Tuesday's Globe and Mail
Published Tuesday, Jan. 09, 2007

There was, of course, Expo 67 and the opening of the National Arts Centre, but there were also the Centennial Projects, the commission overseeing the country's 100th birthday agreeing to underwrite some 2,860 of them.

"The construction industry and virtually every community across the nation [as well as Montreal]benefited from Centennial projects," The Beaver reported a decade ago on the effect of Expo 67. "568 recreational centres, 538 parks, 442 community halls, 188 municipal buildings, 144 libraries, museum and art galleries, as well as seven theatres, one UFO landing pad, and one statue of a leprechaun riding a turtle."

Pierre Berton called 1967 The Last Good Year. It wasn't perfect -- French President Charles de Gaulle's visit was a fiasco and the Confederation Train was met by a small riot when it reached Montreal -- but it was probably as close to perfect as this rocky little-big country has ever been.

"A better world seemed to beckon," Berton wrote in his 1997 book on the Centennial. " . . . In 1967 we looked forward with anticipation. In 1997 we look backwards with regret."
retrospectives  1967  Expo_67  Canada  Pierre_Berton  Charles_de_Gaulle 
july 2017 by jerryking
‘Last Secret’ of 1967 War: Israel’s Doomsday Plan for Nuclear Display - The New York Times
By WILLIAM J. BROAD and DAVID E. SANGER JUNE 3, 2017

On the eve of the Arab-Israeli war, 50 years ago this week, Israeli officials raced to assemble an atomic device and developed a plan to detonate it atop a mountain in the Sinai Peninsula as a warning to Egyptian and other Arab forces, according to an interview with a key organizer of the effort that will be published Monday.

The secret contingency plan, called a “doomsday operation” by Itzhak Yaakov, the retired brigadier general who described it in the interview, would have been invoked if Israel feared it was going to lose the 1967 conflict. The demonstration blast, Israeli officials believed, would intimidate Egypt and surrounding Arab states — Syria, Iraq and Jordan — into backing off.

Israel won the war so quickly that the atomic device was never moved to Sinai.
existential  Israel  Arab-Israeli_War  anniversaries  1967  nuclear  secrets  Doomsday  Arab-Muslim_world  Six-Day_War  David_Sanger 
june 2017 by jerryking
“Sgt. Pepper” at 50: Why doesn’t the greatest album ever have more hits? | The Economist
Jun 1st 2017by J.T

“Sgt. Pepper” is one of a select group of albums to have sold more than 10m units in the United States, with 5m in Britain (the third-highest in the country’s history). Its cover, with the Fab Four sporting garish military dress in front of a wall of famous figures, is rivalled only by the zebra crossing on Abbey Road in the iconography of the world’s most famous band. Rolling Stone magazine has voted it the greatest album of all time.....
Beatles  hits  anniversaries  1967  '60s  music  iconic  cultural_touchpoints  psychedelic  kaleidoscopic 
june 2017 by jerryking
The Beatles’ ‘Sgt. Pepper’s Lonely Hearts Club Band’ at 50: Still Full of Joy and Whimsy
MAY 30, 2017 | The New York Times| By JON PARELES.

A half-century after its release, the Beatles’ “Sgt. Pepper’s Lonely Hearts Club Band” is a relic of a vanished era. Like a Fabergé egg or a Persian miniature, it speaks of an irretrievable past, when time moved differently, craftsmanship involved bygone tools and art was experienced more rarely and with fewer distractions.

It’s an analog heirloom that’s still resisting oblivion — perhaps because, even in its moment, it was already contemplating a broader sweep of time. ..........We simply can’t hear “Sgt. Pepper” now the way it affected listeners on arrival in 1967. Its innovations and quirks have been too widely emulated, its oddities long since absorbed. .......... “Sgt. Pepper” and its many musical progeny have blurred into a broader memory of “psychedelia,” a sonic vocabulary (available to current music-makers via sampling) that provides instant, predigested allusions to the 1960s. Meanwhile, the grand lesson of “Sgt. Pepper” — that anything goes in the studio — has long since been taken for granted.......“Sgt. Pepper” has been analyzed, researched, oral-historied and dissected down to the minute differences between pressings,......The new box rightfully incorporates “Strawberry Fields” and “Penny Lane,” the masterpieces recorded alongside “Sgt. Pepper” but released before the album. ...For people who, like me, heard the album brand-new in 1967, “Sgt. Pepper” remains inseparable from its era. It was released on June 1, the beginning of the Summer of Love. It was a time of prosperity, naïve optimism and giddy discovery, when the first baby boomers were just reaching their 20s and mind-expanding drugs had their most benign reputation.

In 1967, candy-colored psychedelic pop and rock provided a short-lived but euphoric diversion from conflicts that would almost immediately resurface: the Vietnam War and America’s racial tension. “Sgt. Pepper” remains tied to that brief moment of what many boomers remember as innocence and possibility — the feeling captured perfectly in “Getting Better,” even as Lennon taunts, “It can’t get no worse.”......

“Sgt. Pepper” had an immediate, short-lived bandwagon effect, as some late-1960s bands sought to figure out how to make those strange Beatles sounds, and others got more studio time and backup musicians than they needed. Artistic pretensions also notched up.......Yet while “Sgt. Pepper” has been both praised and blamed for raising the technical and conceptual ante on rock, its best aspect was much harder to propagate. That was its impulsiveness, its lighthearted daring, its willingness to try the odd sound and the unexpected idea. ......It’s the sheer improbability of the whole enterprise, still guaranteed to raise a smile 50 years on.
1967  anniversaries  music  George_Martin  Beatles  '60s  psychedelic  kaleidoscopic  cultural_touchpoints  ingenuity  daring 
may 2017 by jerryking
The Summer of Love: A Walking Tour of San Francisco, 50 Years Later
Unfurling from the eastern border of San Francisco’s Golden Gate Park, the Haight served as the epicenter of America’s 1960s counterculture movement. “The Haight-Ashbury was the product of teen rebellion against 1950s’ regimentation and the Vietnam War,” said a guide for the local Flower Power Walking Tour who goes by the name Stannous Flouride. “The anarchic aspect was seen as a threat against the establishment but ultimately had a profound influence on American culture.” Cheap rents, more than anything else, drew the first wave of bohemians in the early 1960s. Legions followed, cresting in 1967 when some 100,000 students, musicians and others flocked to San Francisco for a summer of drug-enhanced communing and revelry that horrified parents. This year, to mark the anniversary, events from concerts to art exhibits are being staged throughout the Bay Area (see summeroflove2017.com for details).

Hit songs of 1967 included the Airplane’s “White Rabbit,” “San Franciscan Nights” (inspired by a night Eric Burdon spent with Janis Joplin) and the blissed-out ballad “San Francisco (Be Sure to Wear Flowers in Your Hair).”
1967  San_Francisco  psychedelic  summertime  epicenters  neighbourhoods  gentrification  bohemians  things_to_do  anniversaries  counterculture 
may 2017 by jerryking
Guaranteed to Raise a Smile
May 19, 2017 | WSJ | By Dominic Green

Pop music, psychedelia and nostalgia fused together in the album that defined the 1960s.

Universal Music Group, which owns Capitol Records, is marking the anniversary by issuing a multi-disc box set. There is also a box-full of books intended to reintroduce to us the act we’ve known for all these years. Brian Southall, a pop journalist when the band was together, handled publicity for EMI in the 1970s. Mike McInnerney designed the sleeve of the Who’s “Tommy.” Lavishly illustrated, their books reflect the synthesis between pop entertainment and thoughtful art that the Beatles were after......The 1960s formed the Beatles. The Beatles, with a little help from their friend, producer George Martin, made “Sgt. Pepper.” Now “Sgt. Pepper” defines the ’60s............“Pepper” endures not just because it caught the mood of the Summer of Love, or because it married pop music to the modernist techniques of the collage and the tape loop, or because it sounds quaintly futuristic. “Pepper” endures because it entered the past so quickly. On June 25, 1967, little more than three weeks after the album’s release, the Beatles joined Maria Callas and Picasso in the first live international satellite broadcast, for which they performed a new song, “All You Need Is Love.” The event initiated our age of simultaneous global media and announced the triumph of television. Like its Edwardian costumes and parping brass, “Pepper” was a colorized document from history—from a past in which music, not the visual image, could still change the world.
Beatles  '60s  anniversaries  music  iconic  cultural_touchpoints  pop_music  psychedelic  nostalgia  art  1967  kaleidoscopic 
may 2017 by jerryking
The Feud That Sank Saigon
MARCH 3, 2017 | The New York Times | Sean Fear
VIETNAM '67
feuds  Vietnam  Vietnam_War  1967  history  politics  Saigon  disputes  rivalries 
march 2017 by jerryking
In 1967, the birth of modern Canada - The Globe and Mail
JAN. 02, 2017 | THE GLOBE AND MAIL | DOUG SAUNDERS |

1967 is the hinge upon which modern Canadian history turns and, in certain respects, the key to understanding the challenges of the next half-century.

Today, we live in the country shaped by the decisions and transformations of 1967, far more than by the events of 1867.

Let me make the case, then, that 1967 was Canada’s first good year. We should spend this year celebrating not the 150 th year of Confederation, but the 50th birthday of the new Canada.

But let me also make the case that our conventional story about the birth of second-century Canada is largely wrong. We like to believe that starting in the late 1960s, a series of political decisions, parliamentary votes, court rulings and royal commissions descended upon an innocent, paternalistic, resource-economy Canada and forced upon it an awkward jumble of novelties: non-white immigration, bilingualism, multiculturalism, refugees, indigenous nationhood, liberation of women and gays, the seeds of free trade, individual rights, religious diversity.

But the explosions of official novelty that were launched in and around 1967 weren’t a cause; they were an effect of profound changes that had taken place in Canadians themselves during the two decades after the war, in their thinking and their composition and their attitude toward their country, in Quebec and English Canada and in indigenous communities.


There is a solid line leading from the events of 1967 to the Charter of Rights and Freedoms in 1982: It was impossible to have a Canada of multiple peoples, as we discovered was necessary in the late 1960s, without having a Canada of individual people and their rights.

....Individual rights, Quebecois consciousness, indigenous shared-sovereignty status and cultural plurality weren’t the only inevitable outcomes of the 1967 moment. What Canada witnessed over the next two decades was a self-reinforcing spiral of events that often sprung directly from the centennial-era awakening of a postcolonial consciousness.
Doug_Saunders  anniversaries  1967  nostalgia  nationalism  '60s  turning_points  centenaries  pride  Pierre_Berton  Canada  Canada150  national_identity  aboriginals  postcolonial  symbolism  John_Diefenbaker  Lester_Pearson  multiculturalism  Quebecois  Quiet_Revolution  monoculturalism  land_claim_settlements  immigration  royal_commissions  sesquicentennial  Charter_of_Rights_and_Freedoms  Confederation  retrospectives 
january 2017 by jerryking
Europe should forget Google and investigate its own shortcomings — FT.com
APRIL 22, 2016 | FT | by Michael Moritz

There’s nothing new about this strain of anti-Americanism running rampant in Brussels. Some of its intellectual roots stretch back 50 years to Jean-Jacques Servan-Schreiber, the French publisher and journalist, who tried to galvanise Europeans into countering the threat from across the Atlantic with the publication, in 1967, of The American Challenge. Its echoes can be heard in this week’s press conferences in Brussels. Forget the fact that American ingenuity and daring has brought to hundreds of millions of Europeans phones cheaper and more powerful than the supercomputers of the 1970s, thousands of films and TV shows that can be streamed at the touch of a button, free text-messaging services, books that are delivered overnight and thousands of comfortable cars that can be summoned at a moment’s notice.

Rather than pointing across the Atlantic and seeking scapegoats, the Commissioners who have just launched another fusillade against one of their favourite American bogeymen may want to start a series of investigations into Europe’s own shortcomings. This may be a more fruitful exercise than reigniting the spent flames of the 1960s.
1967  Michael_Moritz  Google  Facebook  Silicon_Valley  anti-Americanism  monopolies  Europe  EU  shortcomings  Sequoia  ingenuity  daring 
may 2016 by jerryking
The Life of a Song: ‘A Whiter Shade of Pale’ - FT.com
May 15, 2015 6:40 pm
The Life of a Song: ‘A Whiter Shade of Pale’
Peter Aspden
music  1967  '60s  psychedelic  songs 
september 2015 by jerryking
'Heaven was the word for Canada:' race in Martin Luther King's 'North Star' - The Globe and Mail
Aug. 24 2013 | The Globe and Mail | John Ibbitson.

....Racially, the single greatest achievement may have been the decision by the government of Lester B. Pearson in 1967 to introduce the points system for choosing immigrants, sweeping away policies that had kept non-whites out of Canada for generations.

The following half-century of wide-open immigration and entrenched multiculturalism forged Canadian cities so cosmopolitan, diverse and tolerant that they come closer than any to Dr. King’s dream of harmony and equality....

But only for some. Black Canadians make up 2.5 per cent of the population, but fill 9 per cent of the spaces in the country’s prisons, according to the federal Office of the Correctional Investigator. Too many poor non-white neighbourhoods are unstable and, for many of those trapped in them, unsafe
MLK  John_Ibbitson  anniversaries  speeches  Underground_Railroad  geographic_segregation  North_Star  marginalization  1967  Lester_Pearson  African_Canadians  overrepresentation  disproportionality  immigration  multiculturalism  Canadian  cities  cosmopolitan  exclusion 
august 2013 by jerryking
Lives Lived: John Alan MacNaughton, 68 - The Globe and Mail
Jul. 04 2013 | The Globe and Mail | ALENA SCHRAM.

“We were doubly blessed – as a generation graduating into a Canada of almost limitless opportunities, and as a group of individuals that had been given an enchanted summer as their launching pad.”
obituaries  1967  inspiration  Bay_Street  investment_banking  retrospectives 
july 2013 by jerryking
The Last Good Year
September 29, 1997 | Maclean's | Pierre Berton

https://archive.macleans.ca/article/1997/9/29/the-last-good-year

It was a golden year, and so it seems in retrospect—a year in which we let off steam like schoolboys whooping and hollering at term’s end. We all thought big that year. The symbolic birthday cake on Parliament Hill stood 30 feet high: ice cream and cake for 30,000 kids and hang the expense! Over and over again, we showed the world what Canadians could do: Nancy Greene grabbing the World Cup for skiing; Elaine Tanner, the aquatic Mighty Mouse, taking four medals at the Pan-American Games; Marshall McLuhan on every magazine cover.

By a number of measurements, we are a great deal better off today than we were 30 years ago. We are healthier and we are wealthier than we were in 1967. The real net worth of the average Canadian is almost double what it was back then. Babies born today can expect to live longer—six years more than the centennial crop of babies.

Why, then, do we look back to 1967 as a golden year compared with 1997? If we are better off today, why all the hand-wringing? There are several reasons, but the big one, certainly, is the very real fear that the country we celebrated so joyously 30 years ago is in the process of falling apart. In that sense, 1967 was the last good year before all Canadians began to be concerned about the future of our country.
1967  nostalgia  anniversaries  nationalism  '60s  centenaries  pride  Pierre_Berton  Expo_67  retrospectives  annus_mirabilis  turning_points 
august 2012 by jerryking
Who's falsifying?
12 Dec 2001 | The Globe and Mail A.18. | Ismail Zayid.
It is Ed Morgan (letter -- Dec. 11) and not Rick Sautin who is indulging in falsified history. The homeland of Moshe Dayan and Yitzhak Rabin was not, in June of 1967, "under attack by its surrounding countries." It was Israel that planned and initiated that war against Egypt, Syria and Jordan. Israel's own leaders at the time testify to that, confirming that Gamal Abdel Nasser had no intention of attacking Israel.
ProQuest  Rick_Salutin  1967  Israel  Middle_East  Mideast_Peace  Arab  Six-Day_War  war  conflicts  letters_to_the_editor 
june 2012 by jerryking
1967: A critical year for Obama’s presidency - The Globe and Mail
KONRAD YAKABUSKI | Columnist profile | E-mail
WASHINGTON AND JERUSALEM— From Saturday's Globe and Mail
Published Friday, May. 20, 2011
1967  Arab-Muslim_world  Middle_East  obama  U.S.foreign_policy  Six-Day_War  Benjamin_Netanyahu  Konrad_Yakabuski  Mideast_Peace 
may 2011 by jerryking
Israeli Spy Had Snares Like 'Honey Trap' - WSJ.com
JULY 22, 2009 | Wall Street Journal | By STEPHEN MILLER. Obit
for Meir Amit 1921 - 2009. And to Mr. Amit, success could breed failure.
He believed the 1967 victory, for example, spawned a dangerous
complacency. "After the war we succumbed to the disease of arrogance, of
'We know better, we are the best, far above the others,'" he once said.
Shai Tsur, Mr. Amit's grandson, says his grandfather believed "the
failure of the 1973 war, especially on the part of military
intelligence, was a direct product of this 'konseptziya,'" the idea that
Israel was so strong that its neighbors would never attack.
Israeli  Mossad  security_&_intelligence  1967  obituaries  spymasters  spycraft  Six-Day_War  complacency  overconfidence 
november 2009 by jerryking
June, 1967, may yet prove the beginning of a solution
Marcus Gee. The Globe and Mail. Toronto, Ont.: Jun 1, 2007. pg. A.21
Marcus_Gee  Middle_East  Israel  1967  Six-Day_War 
may 2009 by jerryking
The Six-Day War that will never end
Feb. 10, 2009, G&M op-ed by Tom Segev points out that the
conflict is not merely about land and water and mutual recognition. It
is about national identity. Both the Israelis and the Palestinians
define themselves by the Holy Land – all of it. Any territorial
compromise would force both sides to give up part of their identity.
Israel  Arab  war  1967  conflicts  Six-Day_War 
february 2009 by jerryking

Copy this bookmark:





to read