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Ad Giant Wins Over Disney With Big Data Pitch
Oct. 15, 2019 | The New York Times | By Tiffany Hsu.

Advertising pitches have come a long way since the 1960s, when creative teams tried to impress potential clients with snappy slogans, catchy jingles and arresting visuals while pledging to attract the housewife segment or the businessman demographic.

These days, big companies look to ad companies for their data smarts as much as their marketing expertise. The agencies with the most persuasive pitches are those that have increasingly personalized data on the patterns and preferences of a broad range of consumers.

Disney already has plenty of data on its customers. But the prospect of precisely targeting potential moviegoers, theme-park visitors, hotel guests and subscribers for its coming Disney Plus streaming service appealed to the company, according to two people familiar with the pitch process.

While the Disney-Publicis deal may benefit both companies, some worry that it may put consumer privacy at risk.

“This is in essence creating a data broker division to Disney, expanding what Disney already knows, which is a lot,” said Jeffrey Chester, the executive director of the Center for Digital Democracy, a nonprofit consumer advocacy group. “You’re telling your entire life history to Mickey Mouse.”

On Nov. 12, the Disney will start its streaming challenger to Netflix, Disney Plus.
In North America, Publicis will take charge of media strategy for the Disney Plus streaming service as well as Disney resorts and amusement parks. Epsilon was a major draw because of the extremely detailed data it has compiled. The company may very well know if you are lactose intolerant or are in the market for a pickup truck with 60,000 miles on it. If you are into astrology or have taken out a home-equity loan, it may know that too. Epsilon could, for example, beam a Disney Plus ad to parents who have bought a Lion King costume for their toddler.....“They have the capacity to really understand who is a likely prospect for the streaming service and where that person resides online, and they can send messages in the appropriate media to that individual,” .....most of the advertising industry is struggling to compete against Facebook and Google, analysts said. The platforms dominate the business of buying and selling digital ads, leaving the agencies little room to negotiate. Facebook and Google have also started working directly with many advertising clients, luring them away from traditional ad companies.

In leaning on data to improve its fortunes, Publicis is part of a larger industry trend. Dentsu bought a majority stake in the data marketing firm Merkle Group in 2016, and Interpublic Group bought the data marketing firm Acxiom in 2018.....a “huge consolidation” within advertising that has allowed huge holding companies to gobble up agencies and data companies that are increasingly looking for ways to advertise using personal data.

He said that viewership data from the ad-free Disney Plus, including details involving children, could be passed on to Epsilon, which could use the information to target consumers with marketing for other Disney offerings.

“It’s Madison Avenue bringing you Silicon Valley,”
advertising  advertising_agencies  analytics  big_bets  data  Disney  Epsilon  Madison_Avenue  marketing  Omnicom  personal_data  pitches  privacy  Publicis  Silicon_Valley  streaming  target_marketing  theme_parks 
october 2019 by jerryking
The Ad Industry Has High Hopes for Direct-to-Consumer Businesses
June 17, 2019 | WSJ | By Nat Ives.

Advertising has turned its attention to what it hopes will be the next new engine of growth for the industry: direct-to-consumer marketers.

Direct-to-consumer businesses, which offer everything from mattresses to toothbrushes to home workouts, start by cutting out middlemen such as physical retail distributors. And they relentlessly focus on measures such as the cost to acquire a new customer—while relying on advertising, usually on social media, as the main way to grow.......ad executives hope that the booming DTC business can become a major new revenue source for the industry.....DTC brands play in an apparently unlimited range of products and could have rapid expansion ahead.

A varied field
Measures of DTC activity vary, but all indicate rapid growth. For a picture of U.S. ad spending by DTC companies, Magna tracks a basket of 13 companies that it considers disrupters, including footwear seller Allbirds Inc. and bedding marketer Casper Sleep Inc. Their spending increased 35% last year to $378 million, and is likely to grow another 30% this year and 25% next year.

And they’re spreading out from their usual advertising havens such as social media. The 13 brands’ national TV spending soared 42% in 2018 to $137 million, for instance, and is expected to rise 34% this year and 25% in 2020, Magna says........For some DTC brands, diversification is partly about protection.....Bombas LLC decided to move a big chunk of its marketing budget away from Facebook .....fearing its strategy could be hurt if the social network unexpectedly changed an algorithm or shifted a policy......Diversification is also a matter of taking growth to another level. DTC brands are “reaching the scale where they want to talk to the mass market, to consumers everywhere in the country, not just the trendsetters,” ......After a certain point for a DTC brand, increasing spending in the same place begins to produce diminishing returns, says Heidi Zak, co-founder and co-chief executive at DTC bra company ThirdLove Inc. The company says it has sold more than four million bras since it started taking orders in 2014, and has had annualized revenue growth of 180% over the past four years. It declines to disclose its sales figures or ad budget.

“Today, when people ask me where we are, I say pretty much everywhere,” Ms. Zak says, rattling off advertising channels including Facebook, Pinterest , search, podcasts, radio, direct mail, print and TV. The company ran its first national branding campaign last fall to advance a theme of “To Each, Her Own”—with a longer-term goal rather than immediate sales.
advertising  advertising_agencies  booming  brands  customer_acquisition  direct-to-consumer  diversification  out-of-home  self-protection  social_media  store_openings 
june 2019 by jerryking
‘Math men’ not mad men rule advertising’s data age, says Lévy
May 5, 2019 | Financial Times | by Anna Nicolaou.

Maurice Levy: 'The future [of advertising] is based on data. It is not based on any mass media.' We know that mass media is [declining] every day,” “And if an advertising agency wants to have a future, data is absolutely indispensable.”

the advertising industry was undergoing a “metamorphosis” that required big bets.......As consumers shift attention away from pricey television commercials and towards the internet, where Facebook and Google dominate, the industry is more “math men” than mad men......In light of digital disruption Publicis, the world’s third-largest advertising agency by revenues, has made a big bet on data. In April the company made its largest acquisition with the purchase of Epsilon, a digital marketing company owned by Alliance Data Systems......Like its rivals WPP and Omnicom, Publicis is under pressure as Facebook and Google have disintermediated the traditional agency model. The two tech groups account for two-thirds of digital advertising sales in the US.....The industry has been consolidating as traditional agencies look to position themselves as data analytics gurus who can help brands target shoppers online. Last year Interpublic bought data business Acxiom for $2bn, while just last month buzzy agency Droga5 sold itself to Accenture......Despite lingering fears that an economic slowdown is looming, “the situation is much better now,”.... making the Epsilon decision easier. “The fastest-growing segment in our industry is data, technology, internet. Period. All the rest is suffering.”
advertising  advertising_agencies  analytics  big_bets  data  decline  disruption  disintermediation  Epsilon  Facebook  Google  Interpublic  Mad_Men  marketing  mass_media  mathematics  Maurice_Lévy  Omnicom  Publicis  WPP 
may 2019 by jerryking
How the modern office is killing our creativity
March 14, 2019 | | Financial Times | by Pilita Clark.

Roger Mavity and Stephen Bayley, the design guru, have published "How to Steal Fire", ....a book on one of the most eagerly sought qualities in the business world: creativity. Companies buffeted by a storm of digital disruption and competitive pressures have embraced the need for creative thinking with gusto in recent years, which marks a turnaround......CEOs have talked ....about the importance of innovation (i.e. the implementation of new ideas), but far less attention has been devoted to figuring out how to foster creativity itself.....“The first thing that helps creativity is solitude,” “Creativity is essentially an individual rather than a collective activity.” Sir Isaac Newton was a case in point....The great thoughts that helped him go on to formulate the theory of gravity came after the Great Plague closed his university (Cambridge) and he spent nearly two years shut away in his home in Lincolnshire......When he was running Microsoft, Bill Gates used to head off by himself to a secluded hideaway twice a year for what he called Think Week.....Mavity says: “If you need to produce an idea, isolating yourself can be enormously beneficial.”......“How you do that in a big open-plan office with 100 other people trying to be creative at the same time?.......Solitude is in hopelessly short supply at a time when companies are captivated by the financial allure of the open-plan office and its evil twin, hot-desking. ....The idea that great creative thoughts come from teamwork, brainstorming and the ever-present away day is one of the “great myths” of creativity......the Ringelmann effect, named after a French engineer, Max Ringelmann, who first observed that individual productivity falls as group size increases. Away days can be useful for helping people get to know each other better, but not for generating ideas, said Mr Mavity. As his book puts it: “Brainstorming produces, at best, a light, irritating drizzle of complacent mediocrity.”....smart companies understand the need for focused concentration [JCK: sustained inquiry]...what should executives be doing to foster creativity?....“They have to walk the talk,” ....leaders need to set clear goals and then give people doing creative work the time, resources and autonomy to achieve them....Managers must be genuinely open to new thoughts and make sure good ideas are fostered. “None of it is rocket science or brain surgery,” “But you have to pay attention on a regular basis to whether people have these things.”
advertising  billgates  books  brainstorming  creativity  disruption  ergonomics  innovation  Isaac_Newton  myths  pay_attention  solitude  sustained_inquiry  teams  workplaces  ideas  open-plan 
march 2019 by jerryking
Barbara Gardner Proctor Became a Role Model for African-American Women
Jan. 25, 2019 | WSJ | By James R. Hagerty.

Barbara Gardner Proctor applied for a Small Business Administration loan to start an advertising firm in 1970, she was asked what her collateral was. “Me,” she replied. That turned out to be solid backing for the loan. Her Chicago-based firm, Proctor & Gardner Advertising Inc., lasted for 25 years and worked for clients including Kraft Foods and Sears, Roebuck & Co.

Though the firm never had more than a couple dozen employees, she became a role model for African-American women staking out positions of influence.
advertising  advertising_agencies  African-Americans  Barbara_Proctor  public_relations  trailblazers  women  Chicago  concision  writing  obituaries 
january 2019 by jerryking
Amazon set for Prime Day ad revenue bonanza | Financial Times
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Amazon  Amazon_Prime  brands  advertising  e-commerce 
july 2018 by jerryking
Meet the New Advertising Agency: Consulting Firms - WSJ
By Lara O’Reilly
June 18, 2018

Competition in the advertising industry used to mean little more than Madison Avenue agencies vying with each other for business.

Now an agency’s competitors include Silicon Valley giants such as Alphabet Inc.’s Google and Facebook Inc., who are cutting out the middleman and working directly with advertisers. Meanwhile, a growing number of ad-agency clients are building in-house advertising capabilities. And consulting firms including Accenture , ACN -0.25% Deloitte and PricewaterhouseCoopers have been bolstering the services they offer clients by buying up ad agencies and design firms that craft things like apps, websites, events and even products.

Accenture Interactive has the largest marketing-services business among consulting firms. Its revenue increased 35% last year to $6.5 billion, and it has been ranked as the leading digital advertising network world-wide by Ad Age three years in a row.
Accenture  advertising_agencies  advertising  CMOs  management_consulting  marketing 
june 2018 by jerryking
Technology has upended the world’s advertising giants - Mad men adrift
March 31st, 2018 | The Economist |

The world’s advertising giants are struggling to adapt to a landscape suddenly dominated by the duopoly of Google and Facebook. Some of their biggest clients, such as Procter & Gamble (P&G) and Unilever, are also being disrupted, in their case by smaller online brands and by Amazon. They are cutting spending on advertising services, and also building more capabilities in-house. Consultancies with digital expertise such as Deloitte and Accenture are competing with agencies, arguing that they know how to connect with consumers better, and more cheaply, using data, machine learning and app design.......This month Marc Pritchard, chief brand officer of P&G, criticised their (i.e. the ad giants) model as a “Mad Men” operation that is “archaic” and overly complex in an era when campaigns and ads need to be designed and refined quickly across lots of platforms.

Technological forces are buffeting this model.

(1) The first big challenge is disintermediation. Despite the growing backlash against the tech giants, Google and Facebook make it easy for firms big and small to advertise on their platforms and across the internet via their powerful ad networks.
(2) The second headache is the rise of ad-free content for consumers, especially on Netflix, and the corresponding disruption of ad-supported television, which has declining viewership globally.
(3) Third, Amazon’s e-commerce might, and the growing clout of internet-era direct-to-consumer upstarts, have weakened the distribution muscle and pricing power of the advertising giants’ biggest clients.....cost discipline among clients is driven partly by the influence of thrifty private-equity investors like 3G, the Brazilian owner of AB InBev, the world’s largest brewer......Sir Martin argues that the budgetary pressures that have forced his clients to cut back on advertising are a cyclical problem, not like the structural challenges posed by technological disruption.

In private, however, a senior executive at a rival ad-holding firm rejects much of this optimism. Technological disruption and disintermediation, he says, will only deepen. The efficiency of targeted digital ads means companies can spend less for the same outcome in branding. ....The advertising firms are responding by hiring away talent, acquiring businesses (in 2015 Publicis bought Sapient, a digital consultancy, for $3.7bn) and gradually changing how they make money. Their plans mostly boil down to two things: investing in digital services and consolidating their collections of businesses so that they can provide a range of services to one client more cheaply under one account.
advertising  economics  marketing  advertising_agencies  Martin_Sorrell  digital_strategies  WPP  Google  Facebook  Amazon  competitive_landscape  P&G  Unilever  disruption  Deloitte  Accenture  Publicis  Omnicom  via:sparkey  ad-tech  programmatic  direct-to-consumer 
april 2018 by jerryking
Daring rather than data will save advertising
John Hegarty JANUARY 2, 2017

Algorithms are killing creativity, writes John Hegarty

Ultimately, brands are built by talking to a broad audience. Even if part of that audience never buys your product. Remember, a brand is made not just by the people who buy it, but also by the people who know about it. Fame adds value to a brand, but to build it involves saying something that captures the public’s imagination. It needs to broadcast.

Now, data are fundamentally important in the building of a market. “Big data” can provide intelligence, gather information, identify buying patterns and determine certain outcomes. But what it cannot do is create an emotional bond with the consumer. Data do not make magic. That is the job of persuasion. And it is what makes brands valuable...... Steve Jobs or James Dyson did not build brilliant companies by waiting for a set of algorithms to tell them what to do.

Persuasion and promotion.

In today’s advertising world, creativity has taken a back seat. Creativity creates value and with it difference. And difference is vital for giving a brand a competitive edge. But the growing belief in “data-only solutions” means we drive it out of the marketplace.

If everything ends up looking the same and feeling the same, markets stagnate.
advertising  Steve_Jobs  creativity  human_ingenuity  data  massive_data_sets  data_driven  brands  emotional_connections  persuasion  ingenuity  daring  algorithms 
february 2018 by jerryking
Kenneth Cole on keeping retail fashionable in a modern age
Nov. 2, 2017 | The Globe and Mail | SUSAN KRASHINSKY ROBERTSON.

About a year ago, your company announced the closing of all but two of your stores in the United States. Why?

The retail model needs to be re-imagined. We're looking to focus on the brand experience in the virtual universe, and then recreate a new physical experience.

How much of your sales in the future do you envision coming from the brick-and-mortar space?

Everyone is trying to figure it out. The shopping experience needs to be very different. It's happening really fast. It will be an interesting time. A lot of people will not survive it. At the end of the day, you'll have a stronger, more efficient marketplace.

More than three decades into the business, how has your view of advertising changed?

In the past, my goal was to sell my brand. Over the past five years, it seems everybody is their own brand – they wake up every day and curate it on their Facebook, their Twitter feed, their Instagram feed. My goal is to hopefully convince you to allow me to be part of your brand. All of that is changing.
Kenneth_Cole  brands  Susan_Krashinsky  retailers  fashion  bricks-and-mortar  cause_marketing  advertising  store_closings  shopping_experience  physical_experiences 
november 2017 by jerryking
The Not-So-Glossy Future of Magazines -
SEPT. 23, 2017 | The New York Times | By SYDNEY EMBER and MICHAEL M. GRYNBAUM.

Suddenly, it seemed, longstanding predictions about the collapse of magazines had come to pass.

Magazines have sputtered for years, their monopoly on readers and advertising erased by Facebook, Google and more nimble online competitors. But editors and executives said the abrupt churn in the senior leadership ranks signaled that the romance of the business was now yielding to financial realities.

As publishers grasp for new revenue streams, a ‘‘try-anything’’ approach has taken hold. Time Inc. has a new streaming TV show, “Paws & Claws,” that features viral videos of animals. Hearst started a magazine with the online rental service Airbnb. Increasingly, the longtime core of the business — the print product — is an afterthought, overshadowed by investments in live events, podcasts, video, and partnerships with outside brands.

The changes represent one of the most fundamental shifts in decades for a business that long relied on a simple formula: glossy volumes thick with high-priced ads.

“Sentimentality is probably the biggest enemy for the magazine business,” David Carey, the president of Hearst Magazines, said in an interview. “You have to embrace the future.”.......experiments are part of an industrywide race to find some way — any way — to make up for the hemorrhaging of revenue.

Hearst recently introduced The Pioneer Woman Magazine, a partnership with the Food Network host Ree Drummond that was initially sold only at Walmart. Its new travel publication, Airbnbmag, is geared toward customers of the do-it-yourself online rental site, with distribution at newsstands, airports and supermarkets. Meredith has started a magazine called The Magnolia Journal with the HGTV stars Chip and Joanna Gaines.

Even Condé Nast, the glitzy purveyor of luxury titles, has recognized the advantages of outside partnerships....debuting a quarterly print title for Goop, Gwyneth Paltrow’s lifestyle brand, with a cover featuring a topless Ms. Paltrow submerged in mud from France.
magazines  generational_change  brands  Vanity_Fair  print_journalism  churn  events  partnerships  sentimentality  digital_media  journalism  Hearst  Meredith  publishing  advertising  decline  experimentation  trends  Condé_Nast  resignations  exits  popular_culture 
september 2017 by jerryking
Terry's Strategy
After 22 years at Pirate Radio, the voice of the industry is moving on. What's he thinking?

THIS WON'T BE THE FIRST TIME TERRY O'REILLY HAS CHANGED tracks, and if history is any indication, he'll p...
Terry_O'Reilly  radio  CBC_Radio  marketing  advertising  persuasion 
september 2017 by jerryking
Verizon Wants to Build an Advertising Juggernaut. It Needs Your Data First - WSJ
By Ryan Knutson
Sept. 5, 2017

Verizon still wants customers to opt-in to its most comprehensive advertising program, called Verizon Selects. Data collected under the program is shared with Oath, the digital-media unit Verizon created when it bought AOL and Yahoo.

Since access to data from customers could make it easier to tailor ads to their liking, Verizon hopes the information will help it gain advertising revenue to offset sluggish growth in its cellular business. .....Verizon makes it clear during the sign-up process what data consumers are giving up: Information about their demographics and interests, what websites they visit, what apps and features they use, and their location.

The disclaimer quickly drew criticism in the tech world. Adam Levin, a consumer advocate and founder of data-security firm CyberScout, warned in a column on HuffPost that the “hidden cost of Verizon’s ’free’ rewards program is your data.”
Verizon  privacy  loyalty_management  digital_strategies  location_based_services  opt-in  Verizon_Up  subscriptions  advertising  personal_data  Verizon_Selects 
september 2017 by jerryking
Hard sell for the ad men
| Financial Times |

Consumer goods groups are cutting costs amid slowing growth – the advertising industry is first to feel the pinch
CPG  cost-cutting  shareholder_activism  advertising  Big_Food  advertising_agencies  P&G  bots  marketing  budgets  Unilever  ABInBev  Mondelez  WPP  Interpublic  brands  Nestlé  slow_growth 
august 2017 by jerryking
Will Packer Starting Production Company With Backing From Discovery and Universal
JULY 25, 2017 | The New York Times | By MICAH MAIDENBERG.

Mr. Will Packer, 43, is already known as one of the prominent African-American producers in Hollywood, with movies that have grossed more than $1 billion.....best known for his work in movies, including the “Ride Along” films and “The Wedding Ringer.” Now he wants to take aim at consumers using just about every other form of contemporary media.....Packer is starting a new company, Will Packer Media, with backing from Discovery Communications and Universal Pictures. The new entity aims to develop a wide range of programming, from television shows and documentaries to short-form digital videos and advertising campaigns.....telling stories the way that a given story should be told...without having to look at it as one particular type of content for one particular medium.”.....To support the company’s planned advertising campaigns, Will Packer Media bought a marketing and technology company called Narrative that was founded in 2013 by the mogul Russell Simmons and the advertising executive Tricia Clarke-Stone. The company will take the name WP Narrative.

Ms. Clarke-Stone said combining her enterprise with Mr. Packer’s new company would allow for storytelling at the intersection of entertainment, innovation and branding. Working with Mr. Packer, for example, will give her team greater access to Hollywood talent.

“Brands now have a new standard they have to live by,” she said, explaining that they must act as broadcasters, publishers and entertainers. ”That’s the only way to engage with audiences.”
Hollywood  African-Americans  storytelling  movies  packaging  documentaries  short-form  video  producers  television  advertising  Discovery  Universal  films  brands 
july 2017 by jerryking
Your Roomba May Be Mapping Your Home, Collecting Data That Could Be Sold
JULY 25, 2017 | The New York Times | By MAGGIE ASTOR.

High-end models of Roomba, iRobot’s robotic vacuum, collect data as they clean, identifying the locations of your walls and furniture. This helps them avoid crashing into your couch, but it also creates a map of your home that iRobot is considering selling to Amazon, Apple or Google.

Colin Angle, chief executive of iRobot, told Reuters that a deal could come in the next two years, though iRobot said in a statement on Tuesday: “We have not formed any plans to sell data.”

In the hands of a company like Amazon, Apple or Google, that data could fuel new “smart” home products.

“When we think about ‘what is supposed to happen’ when I enter a room, everything depends on the room at a foundational level knowing what is in it,” an iRobot spokesman said in a written response to questions. “In order to ‘do the right thing’ when you say ‘turn on the lights,’ the room must know what lights it has to turn on. Same thing for music, TV, heat, blinds, the stove, coffee machines, fans, gaming consoles, smart picture frames or robot pets.”

But the data, if sold, could also be a windfall for marketers, and the implications are easy to imagine. No armchair in your living room? You might see ads for armchairs next time you open Facebook. Did your Roomba detect signs of a baby? Advertisers might target you accordingly.... iRobot said that it was “committed to the absolute privacy of our customer-related data.” Consumers can use a Roomba without connecting it to the internet, or “opt out of sending map data to the cloud through a switch in the mobile app.”

“No data is sold to third parties,” the statement added. “No data will be shared with third parties without the informed consent of our customers.”
data  mapping  privacy  location_based_services  LBMA  advertising  smart_homes  iRobot  homes  home_appliances  home_automation  home_based  informed_consent 
july 2017 by jerryking
An Ad Woman at the Top of an Industry That She Thinks Still Has Far to Go - The New York Times
APRIL 24, 2017 | NYT | By SAPNA MAHESHWARI.

The American workplace and the ad industry have evolved strikingly since then, but perhaps not fast enough. On Tuesday evening, Ms. Williams will be the first African-American woman with a creative agency background — the class of executives exalted on “Mad Men” — to be inducted into the Advertising Hall of Fame, which was established in 1948.

Ms. Williams, the founder of Carol H. Williams Advertising, got her start at Leo Burnett in Chicago. There she coined the tagline for Secret deodorant — “Strong enough for a man, but made for a woman” — and helped sell Americans on Pillsbury canned frosting back when the boxed version was in vogue.....Ms. Williams eventually became the first woman to be a creative director at Leo Burnett, but her career was not without challenges. She learned to ignore or detach herself from situations where men would say culturally “unacceptable” things, she said, and advanced without having a female boss or peer “to derive mentorship from.”........“In those days, I saw people would execute a project because they enjoyed executing the project and the project was just that to them,” she said. “Whereas when I would execute a project, it impacted the bottom line.”....Ms. Williams said the industry still had work to do in connecting with African-Americans. She is concerned that agencies catering to multicultural audiences employ mass marketing strategies that look to target such consumers simply by casting minorities in ads, or making assumptions based on social media data.

“It becomes an issue of, ‘If they see themselves in a commercial, they’ll buy the product,’ rather than it being about the messaging and how that messaging is delivered to them,” she said.

Some companies are also using digital technology to “withdraw what they perceive as insights out of these communities,” she added, instead of “developing research techniques to really get to know this culture.”
+++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++
The 3% Conference, which supports female creative leadership at agencies, has estimated that only 11 percent of creative directors are women, even as they account for half of the industry’s work force. For black women, the field is even tougher: Last month, the Interpublic Group publicized statistics from the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission showing that fewer than 1 percent of executives in advertising, public relations and related services are black women.
advertising  advertising_agencies  African-Americans  Carol_Williams  EEOC  Interpublic  Leo_Burnett  public_relations  trailblazers  women 
april 2017 by jerryking
Machine learning, algorithms drive this advertising company’s growth - The Globe and Mail
MARK BUNTING
Special to The Globe and Mail
Published Wednesday, Mar. 08, 2017

What is programmatic advertising?

Canadian company AcuityAds Holdings Inc. (AT-X) is at the forefront of that transformation. It specializes in what’s called programmatic advertising where algorithms are used to allow advertisers to target, connect with, and accumulate data about their campaigns and their audiences. One of AcuityAds’ co-founders has a PhD in machine learning and algorithms. It’s one of the reasons the company believes its patented technology stands out from its peers.....
A happy advertiser spends more money

“The whole idea was build the algorithm in a way that delivers a positive ROI for clients,” Mr. Hayek says. “As long as they get a positive ROI, they’re going to spend more with us. And that’s proven itself to be a very good concept because we deal with advertisers. When they make money using our system, they’re very happy and they spend more money on our systems.”

Risks

Is Mr. Hayek concerned that in the fast-growing, rapidly changing sector in which AcuityAds operates, a new technology or unforeseen competitor could emerge to disrupt its model?

“Digital advertising is an $83-billion (U.S.) market place. $51-billion out of that is already programmatic,” Mr. Hayek explains. “All the pipes are already built, it was a fundamental shift that this is how we do this kind of business.”
machine_learning  algorithms  ad-tech  advertising  programmatic  risks 
march 2017 by jerryking
Moving targets; Smartphones and tablets
What advertisers love, and what they hate, about mobile devices

MARKETERS' MANTRA OF reaching "the right person, with the right message, at the right time" has become a lot more achievable in the p...
geofencing  location_based_services  native_advertising  advertising  mobile_phones  mobile  smartphones  tablet_computing  beacons  the_right_people 
february 2017 by jerryking
The world wild web; The future
These days advertisers are feeling less certain of themselves. They are still trying to come to grips with the radical changes technology has brought to the way advertising is consumed, sold and perso...
future  advertising  privacy  personalization  David_Ogilvy  tradeoffs 
february 2017 by jerryking
Little Brother
Sep 11th 2014 | The Economist | Alexandra Suich.

In 1963 David Ogilvy, the father of Madison Avenue and author of a classic business book, “Confessions of an Advertising Man”, wrote: “An advertisement is like a radar sweep, constantly hunting new prospects as they come into the market. Get a good radar, and keep it sweeping.”.....Behavioural profiling has gone viral across the internet, enabling firms to reach users with specific messages based on their location, interests, browsing history and demographic group......Extreme personalisation in advertising has been slow to come... online advertising space is unlimited and prices are low, so making money is not as easy as it was in the offline world,.....Digital advertising is being buoyed by three important trends. The first is the rise of mobile devices, such as smartphones....The second, related trend is the rise of social networks such as Facebook, Twitter and Pinterest, which have become an important navigation system for people looking for content across the web. ......The third big development has been the rise of real-time bidding, or “programmatic buying”, a new system for targeting consumers precisely and swiftly with online adverts. Publishers, advertisers and intermediaries can now bid for digital ads electronically and direct them to specific consumers at lightning speed.....The lines between established media businesses are becoming blurred. Richard Edelman, the boss of Edelman, a public-relations firm, describes the media and advertising business as a “mosh pit”. .... clients’ biggest question is whether people will even notice their ads. ...This special report will show that technology is profoundly changing the dynamics of advertising. Building on the vast amount of data produced by consumers’ digital lives, it is giving more power to media companies that have a direct relationship with their customers and can track them across different devices. ....Consumers may gain from advertising tailored to their particular needs, and so far most of them seem content to accept the ensuing loss of privacy. But companies are sensitive to the potential costs of overstepping the mark. As the head of one British advertising firm puts it: “Once people realise what’s happening, I can’t imagine there won’t be pushback.”
Facebook  Twitter  Pinterest  Ogilvy_&_Mather  David_Ogilvy  behavioural_targeting  pushback  books  effectiveness  haystacks  privacy  native_advertising  ad-tech  Conversant  Kraft  personalization  trends  mobile_phones  smartphones  social_media  real-time  auctions  programmatic  advertising  online_advertising  Omnicom 
february 2017 by jerryking
Advertisers Try New Tactics to Break Through to Consumers - WSJ
By SUZANNE VRANICA
June 19, 2016

companies are rewriting their marketing playbooks. Some are blurring the line between advertising and content, in the hopes of passing through the filter of what consumers actually see and read. Others are diving deeper into data and location targeting on the theory that consumers will embrace ads that they find relevant.......Marketers have been drawn to digital advertising because of the promise of targeting consumers with more precision. But the backlash over the quantity and intrusiveness of digital marketing, and the adoption of ad blockers, is forcing them to figure out other ways to capture users’ attention......Advertisers like Coldwell Banker Real Estate LLC are embracing so-called native ads, which seamlessly blend into a user’s feed and are harder to distinguish from editorial content.

“Native ads have 50% higher click-through rates than any of our [display] banner inventory,” ....Alison Lewis, chief marketing officer of J&J’s consumer business, said that for decades, the company would create two 30-second TV spots, two billboard ads and five print ads every year. That is “not how the world works today,” she said.
advertising  offensive_tactics  Johnson_&_Johnson  Netflix  content  backlash  location_based_services  Coldwell_Banker  marketing  precision  target_marketing  playbooks 
february 2017 by jerryking
Mobile Ad Targeting Is Improving, According to Nielsen - WSJ
By JACK MARSHALL
Nov. 22, 2016

Ad targeting accuracy varied based on the demographic groups that campaigns were aimed at, however. For example, desktop ads performed better than mobile ads when targeting broader age ranges.

Conversely, Nielsen said mobile campaigns were more effective in connecting with narrower audiences. For example, for campaigns aimed at people aged between 18 and 34, 63% of mobile ads reached their intended demographic target, compared with 53% on desktop.

Despite advances in targeting technology, Nielsen said it remains highly unlikely that digital ad campaigns could ever achieve a 100% on-target percentage, because of consumer behaviors such as misrepresenting their age or gender, or sharing digital devices with family and friends.
mobile_phones  smartphones  advertising  targeting  LBMA  Nielsen  consumer_behavior  misrepresentation  demographic_information 
february 2017 by jerryking
What Is Programmatic Advertising And Is It The Future?
Had to start out with what I thought was the obvious first question - wanted to get his personal definition. And then learn more about his company, what they are doing in the arena and how they are different. And also what he thinks marketers are doing wrong when it comes to advertising in the digital space.

SO: What is "programmatic advertising?"

GC: Programmatic Advertising is the automation of the buying and selling of desktop display, video, FBX, and mobile ads using real-time-bidding. Programmatic describes how online campaigns are booked, flighted, analyzed, and optimized via demand-side software (DSP) interfaces and algorithms.
programmatic  advertising  online_advertising 
february 2017 by jerryking
Breitbart Treats Kellogg to Its Smash-Mouth Style - The New Yorker
By Rob Walker   December 9, 2016

There are downsides to the efficiency of programmatic advertising. The reliance on machine learning and data crunching, rather than more subjective measures, can lead brands to display their wares in online environments they’d normally avoid—including fake-news sites, or highly partisan, provocative, and divisive ones—and they may not even be aware that it’s happening. It evidently took the involvement of human beings—a very small number of human beings, using social media—to make this clear to advertisers like Kellogg.
programmatic  Kellogg  Breitbart  advertising  online_advertising 
february 2017 by jerryking
Search and find – Medium
Follow

Kean Graham
We can upgrade your Google AdSense to
programmatic  advertising 
february 2017 by jerryking
Advertising: Facebook and Google build a duopoly
JUNE 23, 2016 | Financial Times | by Matthew Garrahan.

Google and Facebook compete in some areas such as digital video advertising but are present “across every part of the food chain”, according to one ad executive. This seismic shift to a digital and mobile ad landscape effectively controlled by two companies has wide repercussions for agencies, media buyers, publishers and the brands that want to sell more products.

Advertisers like the targeting they get with Facebook and the trove of data it has on its 1.6bn users, just as they like the efficiency of Google search. But they are worried about a concentration of market power in two companies that not only own the playing field but are able to set the rules of the game as well.

Facebook and Google “are hegemons” that could soon be taking campaigns away from television, says Brian Wieser, analyst with Pivotal Research. Paul Frampton, chief executive of Havas Media Group UK, says they are “black boxes” that have too much power. “They don’t give agencies or the brands access to their algorithms and the data being mined are for Google and Facebook — and not for the brand.”
advertising  advertising_agencies  Facebook  Google  Amazon  WPP  duopolies  media_buyers  dislocations  Mary_Meeker  seismic_shifts 
february 2017 by jerryking
How automation is shaking up the advertising industry - The Globe and Mail
SUSAN KRASHINSKY ROBERTSON AND SHANE DINGMAN
NEW YORK AND TORONTO — The Globe and Mail
Published Friday, Jun. 26, 2015
programmatic  advertising  automation  Susan_Krashinsky  online_advertising 
february 2017 by jerryking
Buy, buy, baby
Sep 13th 2014 | The Economist

The advertising industry is going through something akin to the automation of the financial markets in the 1980s. This has helped to make advertising much more precise and personalised. Some advertising agencies and media companies have told their executives to read “Flash Boys” by Michael Lewis, a book about Wall Street’s high-speed traders, to make quite sure they get the message......Real-time bidding sounds high-tech but straightforward. When a consumer visits a website, his browser communicates with an ad server. The server sends a message to an exchange to provide data about that user, such as his IP address, his location and the website he is visiting. Potential ad buyers send their bids to the exchange. The highest one wins and an ad is served when the website loads. All this typically takes about 150 milliseconds.

In reality, though, the ad-tech ecosystem is stupefyingly complex. Luma Partners, an investment bank, has put together the "Lumascape", a bafflingly crowded organisational chart showing several hundred firms competing in this market. Sellers of advertising space often go through technology firms: a "supply-side platform" (SSP) helps publishers sell their inventory, and a "demand-side platform" (DSP) gives access to buyers. Many choose a data-management platform (DMP) to store and buy information about users.

Advanced behavioural targeting, which uses technology to reach specific users with the desired characteristics, helped advertisers increase their return on investment by 30-50%. One popular tactic is "retargeting", which allows advertisers to look for people who have visited their website before and show them an ad related to an item they were looking for but did not buy.
online_advertising  programmatic  advertising  advertising_agencies  LBMA  behavioural_targeting  location_based_services  automation  real-time  algorithms  ad-tech  auctions  ROI 
february 2017 by jerryking
More Wretched News for Newspapers as Advertising Woes Drive Anxiety - The New York Times
By SYDNEY EMBER OCT. 27, 2016

With print advertising continuing to drop precipitously, you would be hard-pressed to find a newsroom devoid of uncertainty anywhere in the country....Across the country, those working in the newspaper industry are fretting as the end of the year approaches. Driving much of the anxiety is a steep drop in print ad revenue, once the lifeblood for newspapers....At the same time, digital advertising and other forms of revenue have been slow to pick up the slack, leading news companies, including The New York Times, The Guardian and Gannett, the owner of USA Today, to cut costs by downsizing....Across the industry, similar declines in print advertising coupled with the shift to digital and, increasingly, mobile, are driving newspaper companies to reconfigure their newsrooms. ...The Times has also announced its intent to make subscriptions the driving source of its revenue...
newspapers  advertising  layoffs  WSJ  NYT  digital_media  cost-cutting  subscriptions  print_journalism 
october 2016 by jerryking
Marketing in the Moments, to Reach Customers Online - The New York Times
JAN. 17, 2016 | NYT | By ROBERT D. HOF .

MOMENTS are having a moment in advertising. Or at least a micro moment.....It is not just a matter of reaching people at a particular time of day, a capability advertisers have employed for decades. Randy Wootton, chief executive of the ad technology firm Rocket Fuel, which recently announced a “marketing in the moment” approach, refers to ancient Greek concepts of time: chronos, or sequential time, and kairos, a moment of opportunity independent of linear time. The latter, of course, is the one his company claims to employ for marketers.

Another key, said Brian Solis, a principal analyst at Altimeter Group, a market research firm, is that the ads need to be more useful than they are attention-getting. According to a Google survey, 51 percent of smartphone owners have bought from a different company than they intended on the basis of information found online.....However, to build brands, an effort that accounts for the majority of ad spending, companies need more than a moment. And few marketers currently have all the skills needed for moments-based marketing, such as ethnographic studies of their customers and the ability to match customer data to the right context,
intentionality  immediacy  GPS  location_based_services  Greek  LBMA  advertising  instant_gratification  purchase_decisions  brands  branding  marketing  ephemerality  impulse_purchasing  contextual  Ram_Charan  P&G  real-time  Flybits  moments  linearity  seminal_moments  chronological  kairos 
february 2016 by jerryking
Q&A: General Electric's Chief Marketing Officer on Storytelling in the Digital Industrial Era | Adweek
Linda Boff says it's GE's "DNA" to adopt new media platforms early. General Electric may be 125 years old, but when it comes to innovative social media campaigns, it's often light-years ahead of most…
GE  Digital  Marketing  Advertising  CMOs  storytelling 
october 2015 by jerryking
Social Ad Platform 140 Proof Says People Aren't Always Honest About Their Locations | Adweek
March 14, 2014 | Advertising Age | by??

As a marketer, you’ve mastered location-based marketing. Your pizza is hot, it’s lunchtime, and you’ve pinpointed those smartphone-carrying consumers who are in spitting distance of your store. But what if your target consumers aren’t where they claim to be?
consumer_behavior  advertising  marketing  creativity 
october 2015 by jerryking
TV Networks Borrow Page From Digital Rivals to Attract Advertisers - NYTimes.com
MAY 11, 2015 | NYT | By SYDNEY EMBER.

Coca-Cola is just one of many brands now shifting advertising budgets to digital and social media, which offer the promise of better consumer data and the ability to reach targeted audiences....“Everyone is coming out with a data play, a data product, right now,” said Jeff Lucas, head of sales for Viacom Media Networks, whose channels include MTV and Nickelodeon.

Television networks, which rely on the upfront season for tens of billions of ad dollars, are facing declining ratings and heightened competition from digital outlets. And while television still dominates the ad market, with some $70 billion in ad spending last year in the United States, online ad spending is swelling. In particular, digital video, which attracted $5.8 billion in ad spending in the United States last year, is expected to grow to $7.8 billion this year and to $12.8 billion by 2018, according to the research firm eMarketer.....the line between TV and digital is blurring, and that advertisers care more about the effectiveness of their ads than where they run.
Coca-Cola  television  advertising  digital_media  online_advertising  web_video  Hulu  tools  brands  effectiveness  data_driven 
may 2015 by jerryking
The networker: Martin Sorrell of WPP - FT.com
March 13, 2015| FT | Andrew Hill.

After 30 years, WPP now embraces some of the best-known names in marketing, advertising and public relations, including Ogilvy & Mather, J Walter Thompson and Burson-Marsteller.
In the process, Sorrell has become one of the best-connected executives in the world....Sorrell performs a similar role at WPP, using a combination of visionary pronouncements and obsessive micromanagement of clients, finances and employees. ....later this year a new chairman, Roberto Quarta, will take over. Quarta, a tough Italian-American with a background in private equity, is expected to be less submissive to WPP’s chief executive than previous chairmen. The question of how long Sorrell ­continues in his role, who could succeed him, and what will happen to the WPP empire if he goes, will be the most important issue on Quarta’s desk....“[If] I have been behaving as an owner, rather than as a ‘highly paid manager’ . . . mea culpa. I thought that was the object of the exercise,” he wrote.
Martin_Sorrell  WPP  advertising  advertising_agencies  succession  deal-making  WEF_Davos  legacies  JWT  Ogilvy_&_Mather  owners  Burson-Marsteller 
march 2015 by jerryking
Behind Martin Sorrell’s Data Binge - CMO Today - WSJ
Mar 12, 2015 | WSJ | By NATHALIE TADENA.

Sorrell, this is about putting his sprawling holding company in control of all the various data marketers are demanding nowadays to make sense of their ad campaigns. They want to know a lot about who is viewing. They want to know which TV shows or Web sites are ideal to reach their desired audience. And ultimately, they want to know how much an ad contributes to an actual sale of a product or service.

By becoming a global data powerhouse, WPP hopes to help clients draw connections across different data sources, better target audiences and ultimately improve the effectiveness of their advertising dollars.
data_sources  Martin_Sorrell  WPP  mergers_&_acquisitions  ROI  CMOs  M&A  data  metrics  measurements  advertising_agencies  advertising  marketing  data_driven  targeting  target_marketing 
march 2015 by jerryking
The Canadian connection to P&G’s 'Like a Girl' campaign - The Globe and Mail
SUSAN KRASHINSKY - MARKETING REPORTER
The Globe and Mail
Published Monday, Feb. 02 2015
Susan_Krashinsky  P&G  Super_Bowl  television  advertising  girls  daughters 
february 2015 by jerryking
Shelly Lazarus: A front seat witness to advertising's gender shift - The Globe and Mail
SUSAN KRASHINSKY - MARKETING REPORTER
The Globe and Mail
Published Thursday, Jan. 29 2015

You started at Ogilvy when David Ogilvy was still around. What was the best advice he ever gave you?

If you attract the right people and you create an environment where they’re as successful as they can possibly be, everything follows from that. ... He judged the output vigorously. He would have divine discontent, we would say. Nothing was ever good enough. If we said, okay, the work could be better, how do we get there? He would go back to either better people, or a better environment where they could do better work. Every answer came back to the quality of the people.
advice  advertising_agencies  Shelly_Lazarus  women  advertising  people_skills  resilience  bouncing_back  dissatisfaction  Managing_Your_Career  Ogilvy_&_Mather  Susan_Krashinsky  David_Ogilvy  Pablo_Picasso  professional_service_firms  the_right_people 
february 2015 by jerryking
Big Data rewards come with tricky set of risks for companies - The Globe and Mail
SUSAN KRASHINSKY - MARKETING REPORTER
The Globe and Mail
Published Monday, Nov. 03 2014

It was a sign that Loblaw Cos. Ltd. was taking a specific strategy with its loyalty program: telling people who shop at the company’s stores that their purchases would be recorded and tracked, but that they would be offered something of value in return: rewards for buying the things they like best.

In an age of “Big Data,” companies are scrambling to better target their communications with customers. If done right, businesses hope that this will eliminate more of the irrelevant advertising that makes people tune out at best and irritates them at worst.

But it has also thrown the advertising industry into a potentially damaging situation. As more of our behaviour is tracked, both online and off, many consumers are becoming wary about how their information is stored and used. Combine that with repeated instances of massive breaches of data security, and the corporate world faces the threat of losing the trust of consumers altogether....One area where consumer data is particularly important is in mobile advertising, where companies send people real-time offers on their mobile phones. But consumers are cautious. In supermarkets, 66 per cent of Canadians said that offers on their phones would make them uncomfortable.

“The complexity of the context is something that, if a marketer doesn’t feel their way through that, they can misstep,”
massive_data_sets  Loblaws  Susan_Krashinsky  data_breaches  mobile  contextual  advertising  loyalty_management  Aimia  privacy  risks  location_based_services  missteps 
november 2014 by jerryking
Peak Google |
October 22, 2014 | stratechery | by Ben Thompson
advertising  search  Google  IBM  Microsoft  competitive_landscape 
october 2014 by jerryking
Businesses Are Turning to Beacons, and It’s Going to Be O.K. - NYTimes.com
OCT. 15, 2014 |NYT | Molly Wood.

The point of the devices is to send a specific signal, using low-energy Bluetooth, to phones that come into proximity, as long as those phones are running apps that can respond to the beacon. Those codes then set off an action on the phone, like a coupon, a reminder, a reward or just information. A beacon at the gates of a baseball stadium could open a map to the user’s seat and offer a beer or hot dog coupon.
sensors  beacons  location_based_services  advertising  mobile_applications  Bluetooth  digital_footprints  proximity  stadiums  arenas  mapping  wayfinding 
october 2014 by jerryking
Ugly fruit campaign prompts consumers to rethink what they buy - The Globe and Mail
SUSAN KRASHINSKY - MARKETING REPORTER
The Globe and Mail
Published Thursday, Jul. 31 2014
Susan_Krashinsky  advertising  fruits  fresh_produce 
august 2014 by jerryking
Harry Yates: The man with the brand - The Globe and Mail
FRED LANGAN
Special to The Globe and Mail
Published Tuesday, Jul. 15 2014,
advertising  advertising_agencies  obituaries  Volkswagen  DDB  Avis  brands  Cuba  vacations 
july 2014 by jerryking
Rogers ramps up NHL ad buys - The Globe and Mail
SUSAN KRASHINSKY - MARKETING REPORTER
The Globe and Mail (includes correction)
Published Sunday, Jul. 06 2014

Rogers’ 12-year, $5.2-billion deal for National Hockey League broadcast and multimedia rights went into effect on July 1. As the company prepares for the new season, even in the height of summer, it’s latching on to any event that brings Canadian sports fans together to remind them who will soon be bringing them their hockey.

To do this, Rogers is embarking on one of the biggest years of marketing spending yet for its Sportsnet channel....The campaign marks a shift in Sportsnet’s marketing: In past, all advertising for the sports channels was produced by Rogers’s in-house advertising team; for the NHL campaign, that team collaborated with the company’s ad agency, Publicis, for the first time. The agency will be doing more advertising work as Rogers Media kicks its NHL plan into high gear. In the fall, the messaging will shift to more concrete information on the different ways that Canadian viewers can watch hockey through Rogers properties. For now, the campaign kick-off aims for a more emotional connection.
marketing  Rogers  NHL  Susan_Krashinsky  advertising  Publicis  hockey 
july 2014 by jerryking
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