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jerryking : andreessen_horowitz   50

‘We Know Them. We Trust Them.’ Uber and Airbnb Alumni Fuel Tech’s Next Wave.
March 13, 2019 | The New York Times | By Erin Griffith.

......“There are just not that many places to find people who have seen that kind of scale,” said Ryan Graves, Uber’s former senior vice president of global operations and a member of the company’s board.

Each city that Uber, Airbnb, Lyft or Postmates expanded into created a new set of operational, regulatory and business challenges. Regulators balked. Rival business operators resisted. Neighbors protested. And people abused the platforms, over and over.

Uber managers ran each city like a mini-start-up. “If you were the general manager of San Francisco or of Atlanta, you were the C.E.O. of your region,” ..... “It led to a really entrepreneurial approach from everyone.”......
Airbnb  alumni  Andreessen_Horowitz  gig_economy  IPOs  networks  new_businesses  on-demand  scaling  Silicon_Valley  start_ups  Uber  vc  venture_capital 
march 2019 by jerryking
Ticketmaster’s New Challenger: Your Face - WSJ
By Anne Steele
Updated May 4, 2018

The industry is ripe for disruption. People are spending more than ever on experiences, even as concern is rising about security at crowded live events. At the same time, artists and teams today have little control over how, to whom or for how much their tickets are sold.
entrepreneur  start_ups  disruption  Live_Nation  live_performances  facial-recognition  sports  arenas  Ticketmaster  Rival  Andreessen_Horowitz 
may 2018 by jerryking
Why Andreessen Horowitz Models Itself After A Hollywood Talent Agency - Venture Capital Dispatch - WSJ
By DEBORAH GAGE
Jan 21, 2011

Andreessen Horowitz’s investors, including university endowments, foundations and funds of funds, are also betting big money on the firm’s story, Horowitz says. The firm aims to flip the venture industry on its head by acting more like a talent agency – specifically Creative Artists Agency, which became so prominent in Hollywood that it was hard to do deals without them being involved.

CAA co-founder Michael Ovitz, who served on Opsware’s board from 2000 until H-P’s acquisition in 2007, shared his secrets with the two partners, Horowitz said — even talking to Andreessen Horowitz’s employees when the firm started so that everybody could be on the same page.

Horowitz says he and Andreessen looked hard at everything Ovitz did, “and a lot of little things, we copied,” including even how Ovitz ran staff meetings.

Like CAA – and unlike more traditional venture capital firms – Andreessen Horowitz employs over 20 well-paid partners whose job is to help clients, i.e. the entrepreneurs, much in the same way CAA agents serve the talent.

Instead of book and movie and TV deals, the partners, each specialists in their fields, find engineers, designers, and product managers; the best marketing and public relations; and relationships with key customers – not just top management, but the guys who run the network and the database. They check references, and research companies and markets.

“When we were at Netscape, John Doerr introduced us to the CEO of AT&T,” Horowitz said. “That’s great, but he’s not buying a Web server. If you have no relationship at that level, it’s not as powerful, so we invest a lot in that.”...Like his firm, Horowitz believes every company should have a great story, too, because it motivates employees and helps explain the company to the outside world. “In a company, hundreds of decisions get made, but objectives and goals are thin,” he says. “I emphasize to CEOs, you have to have a story in the minds of the employees. It’s hard to memorize objectives, but it’s easy to remember a story.”
Andreessen_Horowitz  Marc_Andreessen  Ben_Horowitz  creating_valuable_content  Michael_Ovitz  CAA  partnerships  insights  professional_service_firms  talent_representation  storytelling  reference-checking 
march 2017 by jerryking
a16z Podcast: Ben and Marc Explain (Practically) Everything – Part 1 – Andreessen Horowitz
Marc: Cheaper to start. More expensive to grow. So, it goes back to what we were talking about before. So the market sizes are much larger. So, the prize is bigger. The market is larger and it takes more money to be able to build a company in the market. And so, yeah, you can start a lot of these companies with three laptops and three lattes a day and you’re off to the races. Three kids living on ramen noodles. But at some point, you need to build the company. And you need to build the company that is then going to go take the market. And the market is big. And the market is global and you’re going to need a company around that.

You’re going to need a sales force. You’re going to need marketing. You’re going to need a big development organization. You’re going to need customer service, customer support. You’re going to have a big recruiting campaign. You’re going to need partnerships. You’re going to need expansion capital. All these things kick in. And so these companies almost never stay small. It’s extremely rare that you’d see any company that does anything big in tech that doesn’t end up raising…doesn’t end up, number one, raising money and then number two, if you’re going to raise money, raise money from venture capital.
Andreessen_Horowitz  scaling  start_ups  marketing  partnerships  expansions  growth 
december 2016 by jerryking
Scotiabank takes tech quest from Bay Street to Silicon Valley - The Globe and Mail
DAVID BERMAN
Scotiabank takes tech quest from Bay Street to Silicon Valley
SUBSCRIBERS ONLY
The Globe and Mail
Published Thursday, Sep. 24, 2015
Bay_Street  fin-tech  Scotiabank  boards_&_directors_&_governance  Silicon_Valley  Andreessen_Horowitz 
october 2015 by jerryking
Why tech booms are good but do not last - FT.com
INSIDE BUSINESS September 3, 2015 6:14 pm
Why tech booms are good but do not last
Richard Waters
Silicon_Valley  bubbles  Sequoia  Andreessen_Horowitz  Richard_Waters 
september 2015 by jerryking
As More Tech Start-Ups Stay Private, So Does the Money - The New York Times
JULY 1, 2015
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Farhad Manjoo
start_ups  privately_held_companies  Andreessen_Horowitz  Farhad_Manjoo 
july 2015 by jerryking
The Mind of Marc Andreessen - The New Yorker
MAY 18, 2015 | New Yorker | BY TAD FRIEND.

Doug Leone, one of the leaders of Sequoia Capital, by consensus Silicon Valley’s top firm, said, “The biggest outcomes come when you break your previous mental model. The black-swan events of the past forty years—the PC, the router, the Internet, the iPhone—nobody had theses around those. So what’s useful to us is having Dumbo ears.”* A great V.C. keeps his ears pricked for a disturbing story with the elements of a fairy tale. This tale begins in another age (which happens to be the future), and features a lowborn hero who knows a secret from his hardscrabble experience. The hero encounters royalty (the V.C.s) who test him, and he harnesses magic (technology) to prevail. The tale ends in heaping treasure chests for all, borne home on the unicorn’s back....Marc Andreessen is tomorrow’s advance man, routinely laying out “what will happen in the next ten, twenty, thirty years,” as if he were glancing at his Google calendar. He views his acuity as a matter of careful observation and extrapolation, and often invokes William Gibson’s observation “The future is already here—it’s just not very evenly distributed.”....Andreessen applies a maxim from his friend and intellectual sparring partner Peter Thiel, who co-founded PayPal and was an early investor in LinkedIn and Yelp. When a reputable venture firm leads two consecutive rounds of investment in a company, Andreessen told me, Thiel believes that that is “a screaming buy signal, and the bigger the markup on the last round the more undervalued the company is.” Thiel’s point, which takes a moment to digest, is that, when a company grows extremely rapidly, even its bullish V.C.s, having recently set a relatively low value on the previous round, will be slightly stuck in the past. The faster the growth, the farther behind they’ll be....When a16z began, it didn’t have even an ersatz track record to promote. So Andreessen and Horowitz consulted on tactics with their friend Michael Ovitz, who co-founded the Hollywood talent agency Creative Artists Agency, in 1974. Ovitz told me that he’d advised them to distinguish themselves by treating the entrepreneur as a client: “Take the long view of your platform, rather than a transactional one. Call everyone a partner, offer services the others don’t, and help people who aren’t your clients. Disrupt to differentiate by becoming a dream-execution machine.”
Marc_Andreessen  Andreessen_Horowitz  Silicon_Valley  transactional_relationships  venture_capital  vc  Peter_Thiel  long-term  far-sightedness  Sequoia  mindsets  observations  partnerships  listening  insights  Doug_Leone  talent_representation  CAA  mental_models  warning_signs  signals  beforemath  unevenly_distributed  low_value  extrapolations  acuity  professional_service_firms  Michael_Ovitz  execution  William_Gibson 
may 2015 by jerryking
This Is How We Do It: Ben Horowitz on How Software Testing Has Changed - The CIO Report - WSJ
March 12, 2015 | WSJ |By STEVE ROSENBUSH.

Two trends led to the creation of SignalFx...“It used to be that every server was sacred and if one went down, it was a catastrophe,” Mr. Horowitz said. In the era of the cloud and so-called webscale companies, that no longer should be the case, he contends. “Facebook has over one million servers. If one goes down, it doesn’t matter. What matters is how the app that is being served is performing. Is there a bottleneck or is it doing okay?”...The other big trend behind the creation of SignalFx lay in software development process. In an era of continuous deployment and updates, there’s no time to have IT identify a problem and kick it back to the engineers....“What you really need is software developers looking at how applications are doing. But you have to give developers tools to instrument their own code,” he said.

Such monitoring tools will vary from case to case. “Memory usage, response time .. any number of things may characterize an application tier, or Web tier. You have to be able to express things like that.... “In the old days, from the engineering standpoint, functionality was a huge thing. Now it is a small thing when it comes to testing. Scale and reliability are the big things, and testing has to be in real time.”
Ben_Horowitz  Andreessen_Horowitz  software_development  tools  CIOs  monitoring  SignalFx  scaling  reliability  real-time  testing  control_systems  dashboards  instrumentation_monitoring 
march 2015 by jerryking
Lunch with the FT: Marc Andreessen
January 16, 2015 | - FT.com | Caroline Daniel.

As a child, Andreessen was fascinated by technology. “I have the complete series of Tom Swift from the 1910s to 1950s in my office. That was probably the single most important thing I read,” he says of the science-fiction and adventure books featuring a teenaged inventor hero (Tom Swift and his Photo Telephone was one 1912 title). “I liked all the stuff he’s inventing.”
Marc_Andreessen  Silicon_Valley  entrepreneurship  virtual_currencies  crypto-currencies  digital_currencies  currencies  metacurrencies  Andreessen_Horowitz  Twitter  the_single_most_important 
january 2015 by jerryking
Technology will hurt the banks, not kill them
October 15, 2014 | FT.com |John Gapper

Does Silicon Valley really want to blow up retail banking and create an entirely new financial system, or would it prefer to ride on the existing one?...Mr Andreessen, a partner of the venture fund Andreessen Horowitz, added in an interview with Bloomberg Markets magazine last week: “To me, it’s all about unbundling the banks. There are regulatory arbitrage opportunities every step of the way. If the regulators are going to regulate banks, then you’ll have non-bank entities that spring up to do the things that banks can’t do.”...There is no doubt that the infrastructure of retail banks is antiquated, and is built in a way that invites competition from peer-to-peer networks. Nor is there a doubt that banks make themselves vulnerable by how they price – offering core deposit services cheaply or free while squeezing customers on ancillary products such as overdrafts and currency exchange....what is the best way to compete with an industry that makes little from a capital-intensive, regulated service with formidable barriers to entry, and a lot from less protected add-ons? The question answers itself, which is why Silicon Valley focuses on payments while talking about disrupting lending....US laws made it impossible to establish a national credit union open to any customer....One growth area in UK finance has been online payday lending by companies such as Wonga, which promised to extend banking to the underserved. ... tech companies can improve on credit scoring by scanning search histories and social network data...The biggest barrier to competition is that the core business of taking in deposits and keeping them safe is not very profitable in a low-interest world....A start-up bank that has no branches and spends less on patching up legacy software might do this more efficiently – and good luck to those that penetrate the regulatory thicket and try. But it is much less risky to attach a new service to the existing banking infrastructure, and it absorbs less capital....Technology may eventually change the infrastructure of banking but it will not happen soon....“is a long-term threat that will play out over decades, not months or years”...Silicon Valley will compete at the edges, where banks make their best profits.
banks  Silicon_Valley  Marc_Andreessen  Andreessen_Horowitz  disruption  fin-tech  start_ups  Bitcoin  financial_services  underserved  unbanked  regulators  P2P  payday_lending  credit_scoring  low-interest  branchless  capital-intensity  legacy_tech  regulatory_arbitrage  financial_system 
october 2014 by jerryking
Secrets of Silicon Valley - FT.com
September 20, 2014 | FT | By Richard Waters.

(1) Zero to One: Notes on Startups, or How to Build the Future, by Peter Thiel with Blake Masters, Virgin Books, RRP£16.99/Crown Business, RRP$27, 224 pages

(2) How Google Works, by Eric Schmidt and Jonathan Rosenberg with Alan Eagle, John Murray, RRP£25/Grand Central Publishing, RRP$30, 352 pages

(3) The Hard Thing about Hard Things: Building a Business When there are No Easy Answers, by Ben Horowitz, Harper Business, RRP£18.99/$29.99, 304 pages
Silicon_Valley  Peter_Thiel  Google  start_ups  book_reviews  Andreessen_Horowitz  hiring  books  Richard_Waters 
september 2014 by jerryking
Andreessen Horowitz Invests in 'Big Data' Analytics Firm Adatao - NYTimes.com
By WILLIAM ALDEN AUGUST 7, 2014.

Andreessen Horowitz and the other investors in the round, which include Lightspeed Venture Partners and Bloomberg Beta, are betting that companies will embrace Adatao’s subscription-based software. The software, which aims to combine analytical rigor with intuitive design, lets companies search for patterns in the troves of data they collect in their regular course of business.

Christopher T. Nguyen, the chief executive and co-founder of Adatao, said he had already signed up customers in telecommunications and finance, though he declined to identify them.
massive_data_sets  Andreessen_Horowitz  pattern_recognition  Marc_Andreessen  subscriptions 
august 2014 by jerryking
Tristan Walker Raises $6.9 Million From Andreessen, Others - Digits - WSJ
June 17, 2014 | WSJ | By KATHERINE ROSMAN.

Walker's Bevel (https://getbevel.com/) brand of razors, shaving creams and salves has sold well, with more than 90% of customers returning for more products, Walker says. He won’t reveal revenue or sales numbers, though.

Walker plans to use the newly raised money to develop new and existing products, and to get Bevel into brick-and-mortar locations like barber shops and specialty stores. He also is planning in-person and video-conference educational programs to teach African Americans how to shave.
Tristan_Walker  Andreessen_Horowitz  start_ups  Bevel  Foursquare  entrepreneur  personal_care_products  personal_grooming  African-Americans  underserved  Bottom_of_the_Pyramid  bricks-and-mortar 
july 2014 by jerryking
Andreessen Horowitz Bets on a Government Software Start-Up - NYTimes.com
By WILLIAM ALDEN MAY 15, 2014

OpenGov, a start-up that sells software to help local governments manage data, announced on Thursday that it had received a roughly $15 million financing round led by Andreessen Horowitz. It is the first time that Andreessen Horowitz, one of Silicon Valley’s leading investment shops, has backed a company in the business of “govtech,” to use the industry parlance.

Local governments have suffered in the aftermath of the financial crisis, with many forced to lay off workers and cut back on services. But Andreessen Horowitz sees an opportunity in that market.

Government software is “kind of old,” Balaji Srinivasan, a partner at the venture capital firm, said. “So we think we can do a lot there.”
Andreessen_Horowitz  open_data  start_ups  government  OpenGov  government_2.0  gov_2.0 
june 2014 by jerryking
From Andreessen, a Lesson in Corporate Finance - NYTimes.com
By WILLIAM ALDEN APRIL 17, 2014

In a series of tweets on Thursday, Mr. Andreessen offered a framework for thinking about technology valuations — relying on metrics that hard-nosed financiers tend not to consider.

3/Value of company X to acquirer Y often = Potential impact to acquirer Y's business -- which has a lot more to do with Y than X.

4/For example, in product businesses, you'll often hear term "attach rate" -- acquirer Y can attach company X's product to Y's sales engine.

5/Ex: I sell $20B of servers/year; I buy storage company X doing $100M revenue/year; & I can attach X's product to 20% of my server sales.

6/Ex cont'd: I can generate new $20B*20% = $4B/year of storage sales attached to my server business. X's standalone revenue is irrelevant.

7/Ex cont'd: So I can pay up for storage company X based on its projected impact on MY business, way beyond X's independent valuation.
Marc_Andreessen  Andreessen_Horowitz  corporate_finance  start_ups  valuations  standalone  frameworks  software  mergers_&_acquisitions  M&A 
june 2014 by jerryking
Search for a Market Niche, and You Might Find a Crowd - NYTimes.com
By JENNA WORTHAM FEB. 8, 2014

Tristan Walker decided that his moon shot would be revolutionizing the skin-care and beauty-product industry for African-Americans....Kartik Hosanagar, a professor of online commerce at the Wharton School of the University of Pennsylvania, said that even the smallest companies would soon have to start paying attention to so-called unconventional markets.

“There are still two Silicon Valleys,” Mr. Hosanagar said. “Young entrepreneurs in San Francisco, working at a tech firm, surrounded by the tech 1 percent, solving problems for the 1 percent. And there are companies that manage to break through that and become relevant. The Googles, Twitters and Facebooks of the world.”

The companies that break out, he said, are successful because they are adept at appealing to all users. But even those tech giants must think ever more broadly if they are to have continued success and growth. Signs suggest that these companies are trying to extend their reach and understand the complexity and diversity of their users and potential users.
African-Americans  niches  entrepreneur  moonshots  Foursquare  Andreessen_Horowitz  unconventional_thinking  personal_care_products  personal_grooming  underserved  Bottom_of_the_Pyramid  Jenna_Wortham  Tristan_Walker  pay_attention 
february 2014 by jerryking
In Search of the Next Big Thing
May 2013 | HBR | Adi Ignatius interviews Marc Andreessen.

Tries to find CEOs who are product innovators, have bandwidth and discipline to become CEO. It is hard to pair those skills if they do not reside in one person. It is easier to train an innovator to become CEO than to train a CEO to become an innovator. Andreessen is counter-intuitive: he went into venture capital precisely because the prior decade to his launch had been the worst decade in the industry's history. He believes in cycles and so thought that 2009 was a good time to launch Andreessen Horowitz... Take/Understand a long view....Build "fortresses"--a company so big, so powerful , so well defended that it can withstand the pressures of going public. Focus on the substance of what your company is all about. Be about the substance....companies that are built to be independent are the most attractive...generally companies need to have at least two years' worth of cash on the balance sheet in case your revenue goes to zero....takes sales and marketing seriously--lots of products are being sold and you need a way to get the word about your company into the public space...companies are worth investing in (it's value)only if its going to be an innovation factory for years to come....We are in the early phases of Andreessen's "Software is Eating the World" thesis....best of companies AH is looking at today are unbelievably good at analytics. Good at the feedback loop created by analyzing data and feeding those number sback into the process in real time, running a continuous improvement loop....The best founders are artists in their domain. They operate instinctively in their industry because they are in touch with every relevant data point. They‘re able to synthesize in their gut a tremendous amount of data—pulling together technology trends, their companies’ capabilities, their competitor's’ activities, market psychology, every conceivable aspect of how you run a company.
Marc_Andreessen  product-orientated  Andreessen_Horowitz  venture_capital  start_ups  vc  HBR  hedge_funds  SOX  IPOs  lean  analytics  lessons_learned  fingerspitzengefühl  counterintuitive  specificity  long-term  software  virtuous_cycles  software_is_eating_the_world  pairs  skills  founders 
december 2013 by jerryking
Box Inc.'s Aaron Levie Talks Enterprise Tech, Early Flops - WSJ.com
Oct. 16, 2013 | WSJ | By Shira Ovide.

Box makes software that lets workers access spreadsheets and word-processing documents remotely from home computers or phones. Competition comes from big rivals like Microsoft and other startups like Dropbox also going after software sales to businesses?
Box  start_ups  Andreessen_Horowitz  Dropbox 
october 2013 by jerryking
In Search of the Next Big Thing
| Harvard Business Review| An Interview with Marc Andreessen by Adi Ignatius
innovation  ideas  Silicon_Valley  Marc_Andreessen  Andreessen_Horowitz 
may 2013 by jerryking
Software Is Feeding The World: Agriculture Startup Solum Raises $17M Led by Andreessen Horowitz | TechCrunch
Anthony Ha
Wednesday, June 27th, 2012 (Agri-Data)

“Solum’s platform enables farmers to correlate nutrient measurements and fertilizer application to actual yields, in a constantly improving feedback loop. Over time, the result for farmers should be a ‘virtuous circle’ of increasing crop yields driven by ever-smarter and environmentally sustainable use of fertilizer, water and other precious resources. In essence, Solum’s technology will provide the data to drive farmers’ new intelligent machines, and the software to manage their application on a large scale.”
Andreessen_Horowitz  funding  start_ups  agriculture  farming  Solum  software  virtuous_cycles 
february 2013 by jerryking
Quirky Gets Backing From Andreessen Horowitz and Kleiner Perkins - NYTimes.com
September 7, 2012, 12:00 pm 12 Comments
Quirky Gets Backing From Andreessen Horowitz and Kleiner Perkins
By DONNA FENN
start_ups  Andreessen_Horowitz 
september 2012 by jerryking
In Silicon Valley, Founders Fight for Control - WSJ.com
July 10, 2012 | WSJ |By JOANN S. LUBLIN And SPENCER E. ANTE.

There's a power struggle underway in Silicon Valley. At stake: Power itself.

Over the past two years, one of the most influential venture-capital firms has turned the usual rules of start-up investing on its head. Andreessen Horowitz is telling entrepreneurs it prefers situations where the founders have controlling stakes, reckoning that they'll be better able to resist outside distraction and focus on making great products....But Andreessen's approach is also exposing a rift in Silicon Valley, where a group of young and relatively untested entrepreneurs have maintained control over their rapidly growing companies. For now, venture investors are relatively content with the arrangement, as they've made immense sums along the way. The growing worry is that the setup leaves investors little recourse if a highly empowered CEO goes off track.
Silicon_Valley  Andreessen_Horowitz  founders  Joann_S._Lublin  boards_&_directors_&_governance  start_ups  venture_capital  vc  activism  off-plan  investors  distractions 
july 2012 by jerryking
In Facebook Deal for Instagram, Board Was All But Out of Picture - WSJ.com
April 18, 2012 | WSJ | By SHAYNDI RAICE, SPENCER E. ANTE and EMILY GLAZER.

"You want the board to provide caution to the CEO,'' said Ralph A. Walkling, executive director of the Center for Corporate Governance at Drexel University's business school. "They are the last line of defense for minority shareholders.''....Wall Street's traditional rules for valuing companies offer little help in putting a number on a company like Instagram. While the start-up, just 18 months old, had no revenue, its fast growth gave Mr. Systrom leverage. His company is strong where Facebook has been weak—on devices like the iPhone—and took aim squarely at Facebook users' favorite activity, sharing photos.

Instagram makes a smartphone "app" that lets people take photos, dress them up with special effects, and easily share them with friends. In the first three months of this year, its user base nearly doubled, to about 30 million, the company says....Mr. Zuckerberg, who planned to pay for Instagram mostly with stock, asked Mr. Systrom what he thought Facebook would be worth, the people said.
Facebook  mergers_&_acquisitions  M&A  CEOs  minority_shareholders  Instagram  Marc_Andreessen  Andreessen_Horowitz  boards_&_directors_&_governance  user_bases 
may 2012 by jerryking
Investor Uses Rap to Teach Pithy Business Lessons - NYTimes.com
By CLAIRE CAIN MILLER
Published: February 19, 2012

Ben Horowitz, a prominent venture capital investor here, says rap holds a trove of lessons for tech entrepreneurs. Throw business classes and books out the window, Mr. Horowitz says, and listen to rap lyrics instead.

He applies his theory on his blog, where he has attracted a following of tech readers and other executives by offering business lessons, almost all of them preceded by a rap lyric that summarizes a moral, and with recordings from Grooveshark, the music site.

In the process, he has linked two cultures in Silicon Valley, which is not exactly known for its racial or cultural diversity.
hip_hop  Silicon_Valley  Ben_Horowitz  Claire_Cain_Miller  Andreessen_Horowitz 
february 2012 by jerryking
For Some Internet Start-Ups, a Failure Is Just the Beginning - NYTimes.com
By JENNA WORTHAM
Published: January 17, 2012

To pivot is, essentially, to fail gracefully. While the term has been in the start-up lexicon for decades, it is coming up more often in the current Internet boom, as entrepreneurs find that many investors are willing to keep the money flowing even if a start-up takes a hard left turn.

“Ideas are like lightning in a bottle, so if the company is small enough and didn’t seem to capture lightning on their first try, it makes sense to try again,” said Ben Horowitz, one of the founders of the venture capital firm Andreessen Horowitz. “The art of the pivot is to do it fast and early. The older and bigger the business, the harder it is to change directions.”
start_ups  failure  e-commerce  Andreessen_Horowitz  pivots 
january 2012 by jerryking
Marc Andreessen on Why Software Is Eating the World - WSJ.com
My own theory is that we are in the middle of a dramatic and broad technological and economic shift in which software companies are poised to take over large swathes of the economy.

More and more major businesses and industries are being run on software and delivered as online services—from movies to agriculture to national defense......Software is also eating much of the value chain of industries that are widely viewed as primarily existing in the physical world. In today's cars, software runs the engines, controls safety features, entertains passengers, guides drivers to destinations and connects each car to mobile, satellite and GPS networks. The days when a car aficionado could repair his or her own car are long past, due primarily to the high software content. The trend toward hybrid and electric vehicles will only accelerate the software shift—electric cars are completely computer controlled. And the creation of software-powered driverless cars is already under way at Google and the major car companies.....Companies in every industry need to assume that a software revolution is coming. This includes even industries that are software-based today. Great incumbent software companies like Oracle and Microsoft are increasingly threatened with irrelevance by new software offerings like Salesforce.com and Android (especially in a world where Google owns a major handset maker).

In some industries, particularly those with a heavy real-world component such as oil and gas, the software revolution is primarily an opportunity for incumbents. But in many industries, new software ideas will result in the rise of new Silicon Valley-style start-ups that invade existing industries with impunity. Over the next 10 years, the battles between incumbents and software-powered insurgents will be epic. [the great game] Joseph Schumpeter, the economist who coined the term "creative destruction," would be proud.....Finally, the new companies need to prove their worth. They need to build strong cultures, delight their customers, establish their own competitive advantages and, yes, justify their rising valuations. No one should expect building a new high-growth, software-powered company in an established industry to be easy. It's brutally difficult.
Marc_Andreessen  Andreessen_Horowitz  software  physical_economy  creative_destruction  Joseph_Schumpeter  software_is_eating_the_world  delighting_customers  physical_world  high-growth  Silicon_Valley  competitive_advantage  incumbents  the_great_game  electric_cars  cyberphysical 
august 2011 by jerryking
A Venture-Capital Newbie Shakes Up Silicon Valley - WSJ.com
MAY 10, 2011 | WSJ | By PUI-WING TAM, GEOFFREY A. FOWLER and AMIR EFRATI

A Venture-Capital Newbie Shakes Up Silicon Valley
venture_capital  silicon_valley  vc  Marc_Andreessen  Andreessen_Horowitz 
may 2011 by jerryking
Andreessen Horowitz Adds Another Partner - Digits - WSJ
January 14, 2011, | | By Pui-Wing Tam. Andreessen Horowitz,
the Menlo Park, Calif.-based venture-capital firm led by Netscape
Communications co-founder Marc Andreessen and entrepreneur Ben Horowitz,
is adding a new partner who will work with start-ups on market
development.

Mark Cranney, 46 years old, who worked with Messrs. Andreessen and
Horowitz at their previous company, enterprise technology firm Opsware,
will join Andreessen Horowitz as a partner on market development.
Andreessen_Horowitz  venture_capital  Pui-Wing_Tam  partnerships 
january 2011 by jerryking
The New New Andreessen - BusinessWeek
November 3, 2010, 4:50PM EST text size: TT
The New New Andreessen
With Andreessen Horowitz, visionary entrepreneur Marc Andreessen is
trying to reinvent himself as a top-tier venture capitalist and
world-class power broker

By Brad Stone
Andreessen_Horowitz  Marc_Andreessen  venture_capital  power_brokers  top-tier  visionaries 
november 2010 by jerryking

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