recentpopularlog in

jerryking : andrew_willis   18

GMP Capital’s sale to Stifel Financial marks the end of an era on Bay Street
December 6, 2019 | The Globe and Mail | ANDREW WILLIS.

On Friday, the GMP era effectively came to an end. U.S. investment bank Stifel Financial Corp. closed its purchase of the Toronto-based brokerage for about $65-million, and plans to rename it..........GMP started out as a partnership and later became a public company that was always far smaller than global dealers, and firms that Canadian banks started acquiring in the late 1980s.
For Canada’s financial community, saying goodbye to GMP means closing the door on a way of doing business, a lucrative and often colourful approach to deal-making. GMP brought together capital-starved entrepreneurs and deep-pocketed fund managers. The partners put up their own cash – mortgaging homes or draining savings – to fund the operation. GMP was the first to raise money for businesses that became some of Canada’s best known, such as Blackberry Ltd., Birchcliff Energy Ltd., Canopy Growth Corp. and Goldcorp Inc. It is also a major trader in their shares......In extremely simple terms, independent firms such as GMP run on relationships and ideas. Larger rivals are creatures of process and scale. The biggest players have now come to dominate capital markets........the four Day 1 GMP partners: the late Brad Griffiths, mining financier Gene McBurney, trader Mike Wekerle, now a venture capitalist and reality TV star, and salesman-turned-CEO Kevin Sullivan......The new model for independent dealers in Canada is to be small and nimble, or focus on wealth management. The model that worked so well at GMP – using commissions from stock trading to cover day-to-day costs, and taking the lucrative fees from advisory work as profits – doesn’t work when brokerage houses offer to trade stocks for free. GMP’s run is unlikely to be matched.
Andrew_Willis  Bay_Street  boutiques  brokerage_houses  compensation  deal-making  exits  farewells  GMP  investment_banking  nimbleness 
december 2019 by jerryking
Canada’s missed opportunity: Pot industry now being run out of the U.S.
JULY 3, 2019 | The Globe and Mail | by ANDREW WILLIS.

With Bruce Linton’s firing, it’s now all too clear that the biggest companies in Canadian cannabis are run out of New York and the state of Washington. An industry that this country seemed destined to lead when the federal Liberals legalized recreational cannabis last October 2018, is increasingly dominated by foreigners. ...... The opportunity to create global cannabis champions, based in Canada, appears to be vanishing. There should be a conversation around that issue, in political and business circles, before the biggest head offices all disappear... Linton ...lost his job because his visionary approach for Canopy Growth Corp. didn’t fit with the predictable, quarter-by-quarter profits demanded by Constellation Brands Inc....Linton’s departure is similar to what has played out at many startups that get sold to multinational companies. .....Even when we brought Constellation's $5-billion in, I knew, from that change of structure, there would likely be implications for management, but it was the right thing to do for the company.”... our entrepreneurs tend to sell successful startups at a relatively early stage, compared to jurisdictions such as the U.S. and Asia. . The trend, now happening even more rapidly in the cannabis sector, cuts into the potential future prosperity of this country......a study last year from the Washington-based Brookings Institution and the Martin Prosperity Institute at the University of Toronto’s Rotman School of Business – scaling up successful domestic businesses is essential to creating wealth and producing the next generation of corporate leaders. Canadians need to do better at turning their own companies into global champions. Silicon Valley generates enormous wealth out of a vibrant tech community. Why can’t Leamington, Ont., or Nanaimo, B.C., aspire to do the same in cannabis?..Canadian cannabis companies were created by government policy..... federal and provincial regulators granted the licences needed to grow and distribute their products – and local capital markets were receptive to financing them...CEOs, boards and domestic politicians should be asking if the country is best served by a laissez-faire approach to cannabis that created vibrant, valuable businesses following legalization in 2018, then quickly began handing over control of the sector....
Andrew_Willis  Bay_Street  Brookings  cannabis  Canopy_Growth  CEOs  Constellation_Brands  crossborder  departures  firings  global_champions  head_offices  home_grown  industrial_policies  Martin_Prosperity_Institute  missed_opportunities  sellout_culture 
july 2019 by jerryking
Toronto investment bank Infor prepares for wave of corporate credit restructurings -
February 17, 2019 | The Globe and Mail | by ANDREW WILLIS.

Infor was founded in 2015 and focuses on providing merger and acquisition and financing advice to growth companies in the mining, financial services, cannabis and technology sectors. The employee-owned firm is home to two dozen bankers and has advised on 1,800 transactions valued at $250-billion. Chief executive officer Neil Selfe said the decision to move into restructuring reflects a view that a downturn is overdue in credit markets.

“We believe the current economy cycle, bolstered by extended periods of low interest rates and excess leverage, is in its final stages and a substantial corporate restructuring pandemic is nearing,” Mr. Selfe said. Infor is well positioned to advise distressed borrowers, he said, because “as the largest providers of debt, Canadian banks are conflicted in helping corporations navigate this environment.”
Andrew_Willis  Bay_Street  bow_wave  distressed_debt  hiring  Infor  investment_banking  preparation  restructurings 
february 2019 by jerryking
Let the grocery chains fix Canada’s cannabis-supply mess
January 11, 2019 | The Globe and Mail | ANDREW WILLIS.

Despite the long run-up to legalization of recreational marijuana last October, demand for legal cannabis is outstripping supply and the retail system is a mess. ....The Ontario government held a lottery last Friday to award licenses for its first 25 stores, which aren’t expected to open until April. Experts say the nascent industry’s nation-wide logistical issues will take months, if not years, to fix.

Who wins out of this chaos? Criminals. Removing the social stigma from cannabis without ensuring robust cultivation and retail networks are in place opens the door to black-market suppliers, the folks the federal Liberals were trying to put out of business when they started down the path to legalization. Who can set things right, by getting cannabis into the hands of those who want it at prices the black market will be hard pressed to match? How about Jim Pattison, along with the Weston and Sobey clans and the folks running Metro Inc. Provincial governments should be looking to the national grocery and drug store chains to deliver on the federal Liberals' promise of a modern approach to marijuana sales.

Mr. Pattison, who runs the 45,000-employee Jim Pattison Group, has been showing shoppers the love for six decades. Think about what greets you when you walk into one of the former car salesman’s Save-On-Foods grocery stores in Western Canada, or a large-format Loblaws, Sobeys and Metro outlet.
Andrew_Willis  black_markets  cannabis  criminality  grocery  retailers  supermarkets  raw_materials  scarcity  supply_chains  gangs  nationwide  organized_crime 
january 2019 by jerryking
Air Canada CEO Calin Rovinescu’s hardball tactics benefit everyone but Aimia - The Globe and Mail
ANDREW WILLIS
PUBLISHED 3 DAYS AGO

Mr. Rovinescu, whose career includes stints as a lawyer and investment banker along with an investor-friendly flight at the helm of Air Canada, can take credit for launching Aimia as a public company back in 2005. Air Canada’s CEO also pulled the rug out from under Aimia, setting the stage for this takeover, by announcing in May, 2017, that the airline planned to end its relationship and start its own loyalty program when its contract expires in 2020. That announcement knocked back Aimia’s stock price by more than 50 per cent, and shares have never recovered.

Air Canada’s decision to spin out Aimia, along with the airline’s maintenance business and regional carrier, amounted to inspired financial engineering. The offerings brought in the cash needed to spruce up the fleet with fuel-efficient jets and pay down debt. It’s fair to say these deals set the stage for Air Canada’s stunning stock-price performance on Mr. Rovinescu’s watch.

The decision to buy back Aimia is also strategically and financially sound. Loyalty programs and the data they generate are valuable assets for airlines and credit-card companies. Along with Air Canada, this takeover is backed by Toronto-Dominion Bank, Canadian Imperial Bank of Commerce and Visa Canada Corp. The consortium leaves long-time Aeroplan partner American Express on the outside looking in........Air Canada sold high on Aimia, then knocked the stuffing out of the company by ending its partnership. Now, the airline is buying low. Long-time Aimia shareholders will emerge from this journey badly bruised. But Mr. Rovinescu’s tactics are good business.

Students of corporate deal-making may recall how TD Bank, a member of the Aimia takeover consortium, played capital markets to its advantage. In 1999, the bank raised $1.5-billion by spinning off a stake in its discount brokerage division, TD Waterhouse. The move gave TD Bank the capital it needed to buy Canada Trust the following year, a transformative deal.

By 2001, the dot-com bubble had burst, taking with it the premium valuation on discount brokerages. The parent bank bought back TD Waterhouse for a fraction of the price it had sold shares for, just two years earlier. TD Waterhouse shareholders complained, but at the end of the day, they sold. TD Bank’s bosses came out of the experience with a stronger company and burnished reputations.
Aeroplan  Aimia  Air_Canada  Andrew_Willis  Bay_Street  Calin_Rovinescu  CEOs  credit_cards  deal-making  dealmakers  loyalty_management  offensive_tactics  hardball  financial_engineering  transformational 
july 2018 by jerryking
Investment fund makes $1-billion bet on owners who control their companies - The Globe and Mail
The Canadian Business Growth Fund

“Canadian entrepreneurs find it difficult to secure the funding they need to grow, while maintaining control of their business,” said Mr. Rossolatos, who started his own career as a private-equity investor at TorQuest Partners Inc., then ran tech company Avante Logixx Inc. for seven years. He said the new fund, created by the federal Liberal government but backed by the country’s largest financial institutions, will offer an alternative to traditional venture-capital and private-equity funds, which typically demand control of a company in exchange for their money.

“Our goal is to help entrepreneurs scale up their mid-market businesses as a patient, minority capital partner,” Mr. Rossolatos said. The growth fund formally opens its doors on Tuesday with a $545-million capital commitment from 13 Canadian banks and insurers, which have the option of increasing that backing to $1-billion if the concept proves to be a money maker. Mr. Rossolatos joined the fund in January and has spent the past five months setting up the business and hiring a team of a dozen investment professionals.

Backers expect the new fund will help solve what’s perceived to be a chronic problem for small to medium-sized Canadian companies: Owners sell control relatively early in the businesses’ development, and miss out on the opportunity to build regional or even global champions.
Andrew_Willis  owners  private_equity  privately_held_companies  mid-market  mid-sized  global_champions  CEOs 
june 2018 by jerryking
Death by digital: CEOs pay the price for tech trouble - The Globe and Mail
ANDREW WILLIS
The Globe and Mail
Published Thursday, Jul. 14, 2016

Recent changes in the executive suite at Canadian Tire, Sobeys and Torstar show there’s little tolerance for a boss who lacks a smart strategy for an increasingly tech-driven marketplace and even less patience for a leader who fails to deliver on digital promises....It’s this ability to blend tech savvy with the rest of the management tool box – finance, marketing, leadership – that’s essential to CEO success in every field, and critical in sectors such as retail, media and financial services. Because when the tech strategy doesn’t work, corporate boards are clearly holding the CEO responsible. That accountability was not as direct in the past: The head of IT was more likely to be sacrificed, rather than the CEO. Now, the top boss is being held responsible for coming up with the tech-based strategy and executing.
Andrew_Willis  boards_&_directors_&_governance  C-suite  CEOs  CIOs  digital_first  digital_savvy  digital_strategies  execution  IT  strategies  systems_integration 
july 2016 by jerryking
Here's $5 Million, son
November 30, 2007 | Globe & Mail | by Andrew Willis.

Gwen Harvey - Bridgewater Insurance & Wealth Management Inc.
Malcolm Burrows, head of philanthropic advisory services at the Bank of Nova Scotia
Andrew_Willis  high_net_worth  Canadian  parenting  philanthropy  charities  foundations 
august 2012 by jerryking
Pity the high cost of being a Canadian millionaire
February 11, 2005 | Globe & Mail Pg. B13 | ANDREW WILLIS.
Here's the good news: The ranks of Canadian millionaires are swelling.
Unfortunately, the rising cost of being rich is taking a lot of the fun
out of it. Survey this country from coast to coast, as consulting firm
Capgemini just did, and you'll find Canada is home to 450,000 folks with
more than a million bucks of invested assets. The $5-million club has
just over 54,000 members and the seriously wealthy, with more than
$20-million, number about 7,000. Most of these millionaires are
grey-haired -- 72 % are over the age of 50....Aging boomers are an
enormous opportunity for wealth management companies...In 10 years time,
Capgemini estimates the number of millionaires in Canada will soar
20-fold, to more than eight million people. This will take place in step
with an unprecedented intergenerational transfer of wealth, as 32 % of
our millionaires are over age 70..
Andrew_Willis  high_net_worth  statistics  surveys  Canadian  income_distribution  generational_wealth  high-cost  wealth_management  wealth_transfers 
october 2010 by jerryking
Prepare for the deal making to commence
Nov. 24, 2009 | The Globe and Mail | ANDREW WILLIS. Send to Princess Alexander
turnarounds  Andrew_Willis  deal-making 
november 2009 by jerryking
Deal or no deal?
Feb. 21, 2008 | Globe Investor Magazine | By Andrew Willis.
Mergers are usually dangerous for shareholders, but here are five ways to assess if you want to be part of the purchase
Andrew_Willis  investment_advice  mergers_&_acquisitions 
november 2009 by jerryking

Copy this bookmark:





to read