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Brics Agree to Base Development Bank in Shanghai - WSJ
By JEFFREY T. LEWIS and PAULO TREVISANI CONNECT
Updated July 15, 2014

The Brics and other emerging-market countries have vast needs for financing of infrastructure projects, according to the chief executive of Brazilian development bank BNDES, who estimated the need for long-term project finance at about $800 billion.

The new institution, whose first chief executive will be from India, will start out with capital of $50 billion, to be paid in equally by all five Brics countries. Capital is planned to grow eventually to $100 billion, according to the memorandum released after the meeting in Brazil of the heads of government of the five countries.

The Brics have been trying for years to reform the International Monetary Fund and the World Bank, the backbone of the world's global financial structure, to give emerging markets more influence over those institutions, but with little success.

"In the IMF and the World Bank, the U.S. and a handful of allies really do make almost all the decisions, and the vast majority of the world…doesn't really have a voice," said Mark Weisbrot, co-director of the Center for Economic and Policy Research, in Washington, D.C. "The fund has lost most of its influence on the middle-income country in the last 15 years. This is part of the process of change in these international institutions."

The Brics countries on Tuesday called on the members of the IMF to implement reforms to the organization that were agreed on in 2010, and for members to agree to a new formula for voting rights at the IMF.

The World Bank finances development projects around the world, and the IMF is the lender of last resort to countries that don't have the dollars to pay their foreign debt. The IMF in particular is widely disliked among countries that need its help, because of the stringent budget control conditions it usually places on governments in return for its help.
economic_development  BRIC  Vladimir_Putin  IMF  World_Bank  infrastructure 
july 2014 by jerryking
How Canadian companies can tap into Asia’s consumer boom
Jun. 03 2013 | G&M | by DOMINIC BARTON.

Possible send to Earl Davis of Teachers.

To capture this opportunity, Canadian companies need an intimate understanding of the new Asian consumers. First, on the consumption and services front, they need to locate these consumers, with forensic precision....Second, Canadian companies need to understand the diverse and evolving tastes of Asian consumers. Across the region, the number of higher income households is rapidly expanding. These consumers are often young, are more international in their outlook, and are more willing to pay a premium for quality products. They consume more services, from education and health care to foreign travel....Third, Another significant opportunity for Canada is the provision and delivery of food, energy, and natural resources. By 2030, global demand for food is expected to rise by more than 25 per cent, mostly in Asia, and fertilizer demand will grow by 50 per cent.
Dominic_Barton  McKinsey  China  Canadian  target_marketing  consumer_behavior  shifting_tastes  China_rising  booming  Asia  Asian  Asia_Pacific  BRIC  middle_class  inland  affluence  infrastructure  forensics 
june 2013 by jerryking
Emerging from the frontier
Nov 21st 2012 | | The Economist from The World In 2013 print edition | by Ngozi Okonjo-Iweala, Nigeria’s finance minister and co-ordinating minister for the economy

Africa’s growing economic ties with the BRIC economies, particularly China, are well known. As an example, the continent’s trade with China increased from about $10.6 billion in 2000 to $166 billion in 2012. In my own country, Nigeria, trade with China increased over the same period from less than $1 billion to $7.8 billion. In 2013 China will become the greatest influence on the continent as its new leaders deepen the strategic relationship with Africa beyond natural resources. At the same time, civil-society organisations in Africa will demand greater transparency from China in government-to-government relations, and more community engagement from Chinese companies.
Africa will become the next preferred destination for labour-intensive manufacturing

I see many opportunities here for private investors in Africa. As Asia’s economies slow and its wages rise, Africa will become the next preferred destination for labour-intensive manufacturing of products such as garments and shoes. Its large domestic market of 1.2 billion people will serve as a further attraction for low-cost, light manufacturing.
China  frontier_markets  emerging_markets  women  South-South  Africa  private_equity  BRIC  infrastructure  Nigeria  Ethiopia  Angola 
january 2013 by jerryking
Africa next: The quest for Africa’s riches - The Globe and Mail
GEOFFREY YORK

LUBUMBASHI, DEMOCRATIC REPUBLIC OF THE CONGO — The Globe and Mail

Last updated Sunday, Sep. 30 2012
Geoffrey_York  Africa  Congo  globalization  emerging_markets  mining  South-South  BRIC  corruption  Renaissance_Capital 
october 2012 by jerryking
Taking Stock - The Globe and Mail
Brian Milner

From Monday's Globe and Mail

Last updated Sunday, May. 27, 2012
Ian_Bremmer  Brazil  BRIC 
may 2012 by jerryking
Ian Bremmer on Pivot States - WSJ.com
April 27, 2012 | WSJ | By IAN BREMMER.

The Future Belongs to the Flexible
In the emerging global order, the key to a country's success will be courting multiple partners.

We're entering a "G-Zero" world: one in which no single nation (not even the U.S.) or alliance of governments (certainly not the G-7 or G-20) possesses the political and economic muscle to drive an international agenda. In this new decentralized global order, growth isn't enough. A country also must have resilience—the power to pivot....In the years ahead, forget about much-discussed artificial groupings like the BRICS (Brazil, Russia, India, China and South Africa) and the so-called "Next 11" (N11), a roster of potential powerhouses that includes Turkey and South Korea but also political powder kegs like Pakistan, Nigeria and Iran.

In our emerging G-Zero world, with no single power able to set the agenda, the winners and losers of the next generation will be determined not by the rubrics of the moment but by how well and often they are able to pivot.
Ian_Bremmer  BRIC  Myanmar  Brazil  Turkey  Africa  G-7  Indonesia  Singapore  Kazakhstan  Canada  pivots  G-Zero 
april 2012 by jerryking
Portugal begs former colony Angola for a bailout.
For Sale: Europe Begs Its Former Vassals for a Bailout

By Michael Moran

| Posted Wednesday, Nov. 23, 2011,
BRIC  Europe  austerity  cutbacks  debt  Portugal  Angola 
november 2011 by jerryking
Emerging Markets: Redrawing the Map
NOVEMBER 15, 2011 | SmartMoney.com | By RESHMA KAPADIA.

Say goodbye to the old playbook: The best opportunities are no longer where you'd expect.
emerging_markets  JCK  Bangladesh  risks  BRIC  globalization  playbooks 
november 2011 by jerryking
Moving beyond that flat-world theory - The Globe and Mail
May 2, 2011 | Globe and Mail | Harvey Schachter.

Declining global stability is real and the days of a stable world are gone. Mark Anderson, editor of the Strategic News Service, lays out 10 provocative pieces of advice.
Climate change is real
Global consumer explosion is on
Your company will lose money if you go to China
Don't try to serve both the consumer and enterprise technology markets
Innovation is a creative process
Protect intellectual property
The world is not flat
Be prepared for Chinese competitors
Manage for currency manipulation
flat_world  Harvey_Schachter  climate_change  BRIC  China  Chinese  competition  innovation  intellectual_property  volatility  currencies 
october 2011 by jerryking
Time to ramp up BRIC trade - The Globe and Mail
Sep. 27, 2010 | The Globe and Mail | editorial. Canada will
enhance its innovation and productivity by greater engagement with the
BRIC countries and other emerging economies – or so a paper from the
Institute for Competitiveness and Prosperity persuasively
argues....claims made in advance for the Canada-U.S. free-trade
agreement of 1989 were confirmed by experience. It led to overall
productivity gains of 13 %, of which 8 pts. came from the growth of the
most productive Canadian firms, and 5 pts. from increases of
productivity in the typical Canadian factory......Essentially, the ICP
paper shows that Canada ought to build relationships – through trade
agreements, increasing number of trade offices, and more frequent visits
back and forth of leading (and even local) politicians – with the
emerging economies of China, India, Brazil, Russia and other countries,
in order to be ready to make another great leap forward into
productivity growth and an abundance of new patents.
BRIC  innovation  emerging_markets  relationships  editorials 
april 2011 by jerryking
Five Rules for Managing a Two-Speed Economy - WSJ.com
APRIL 21, 2010 | Wall Street Journal | By HAROLD L. SIRKIN.
1. Focus on profits and growth simultaneously.
2. Build differentiation and fairness into the rewards structure.
3. Offer all customers both best cost and best value.
4. Design products for both the "current billion" and "next billion" consumers.
5.Think global, act local.
rules_of_the_game  BCG  BRIC 
october 2010 by jerryking
Globalization 2.0: emerging-market cross-pollination
Oct. 1, 2010 |G& M| Chrystia Freeland. Globalization 1.0:
2-way exchange between west & east or north & south: E.g.
Western companies setting up call centres in India or mfg. goods in
China, China investing in U.S. T-bills, . Globalization 2.0: the
biggest deals & most important capital flows will be between
emerging mkts., without stopping over at Heathrow or JFK. ..Stephen
Jennings of Renaissance Group, a Moscow-based I-bank with ambitions to
be the premier provider for intra-emerging-mkt. capital flows. “MNCs’
advantages (know-how & capital) have been neutralized by an
inability or reluctance to grow explosively in complex, foreign
environments,” “In many emerging mkts. and in an incr. # of industries,
the mkt. leaders have local roots: metals ( Indian), aluminum (Russian),
fastest-growing & largest banks in China, Russia & Nigeria are
domestic.” Yet Western MNCs (e..g GE, Coca-Cola & HSBC) understand
the opportunity in emerging mkts.& agile in adapting to local
conditions.
Chrystia_Freeland  globalization  emerging_markets  BRIC  capital_flows  Fareed_Zakaria  Renaissance_Capital  South-South  cross-pollination  frontier_markets 
october 2010 by jerryking
Unknown Cities in Brazil and Russia Are Getting Richer -
September 30, 2010! BusinessWeek ! By Mehul Srivastava. A
growing middle class in lesser-known towns presents a huge opportunity
to marketers. Most multinationals build a large presence in the top 10
cities of emerging-market countries such as Brazil, China, India, and
Indonesia, so Rio, Shanghai, Delhi, and Jakarta get their
state-of-the-art autos, cell phones, and retailers. Yet this focus comes
at a cost. In a survey of multinationals, BCG found that most of the
companies ignored cities with smaller populations and less apparent
potential. Cities such as Aurangabad, Curitiba in Brazil, Xiaochang in
China, and Yekaterinburg in Russia get lumped together, BCG found, with
the mostly poor, rural populations that few companies, with notable
exceptions such as Unilever (UL), are eager to pursue. "The next billion
consumers, who are far above the poverty line, have high consuming
power, and they are just not coming onto people's radars," says Sharad
Verma, a partner at BCG.
BRIC  middle_class  inland  affluence  internal_migration  cities  BCG  unknowns 
october 2010 by jerryking
Zakaria: Rising Powers Aren't Acting Like It -
Sept. 25, 2010 | Newsweek | by Fareed Zakaria. The newly
rising powers—China, India, Brazil—rightly insist that they be more
centrally involved in the structures of power & global decision
making. But when given the opportunity, do they step up to the plate
& act as great powers with broad interests? On trade? Energy use?
Climate change? No. Many of these countries seek deference on matters of
regional peace & stability while pursuing their national interests
even more zealously. Perhaps the most egregious e.g. is South Africa,
which has insists that it is Africa’s natural leader. Yet S. Africa has
been shamefully absent in the efforts to rescue the people of Zimbabwe
and Sudan from the tragedies unfolding in their lands. Says Shimon
Peres, “You can call yourself a decision maker, but if you are not ready
to donate, to sacrifice life, to take risks—not because your country is
being attacked but because peace is being put into danger—then it’s
more of a perception than reality.”
Fareed_Zakaria  BRIC  Iran  Ahmadinejad  Turkey  rising_powers  South_Africa  Shimon_Peres  leadership  Zimbabwe  Sudan  rogue_actors 
september 2010 by jerryking
The Global Dream
SEPT. / OCT. 2010 | Foreign Policy | BY MICHAEL SKAPINKER
CEOs  globalization  BRIC  books 
september 2010 by jerryking
Another new world order
Sep. 04, 2010 | The Globe & Mail | Kevin Lynch. So, what
shape will this new world order take? Let’s start with globalization.
the information revolution is reshaping how we work, communicate, and
interact. Overlay on this the demographics of aging and the potential
consequences of climate change....Canada’s strengths are impressive and
extend well beyond our strong fiscal situation, stable financial sector,
bountiful resources, agriculture capacity and proximity to the richest
market in the world....In the midst of this changing world order lies
the opportunity for Canada to stake out new markets in emerging-economy
giants like China, India and Brazil, to refocus our market presence in
the United States toward rapidly growing regions and sectors, and to
make Canada more innovative in what we produce and more productive in
how we produce it. It is an opportunity we cannot afford to squander.
21st._century  Canada  Kevin_Lynch  globalization  BRIC  demographic_changes  aging  beyondtheU.S. 
september 2010 by jerryking
The Importance of Frugal Engineering
May 25, 2010 | Strategy + Business | by Vikas Sehgal, Kevin
Dehoff, and Ganesh Panneer. Providing new goods and services to “bottom
of the pyramid” customers requires a radical rethinking of product
development. Frugal engineering is not simply low-cost engineering. It
is not a scheme to boost profit margins by squeezing the marrow out of
suppliers’ bones. It is not simply the latest take on the decades-long
focus on cost cutting.Cost discipline is an intrinsic part of the
process, but rather than simply cutting existing costs, frugal
engineering seeks to avoid needless costs in the first place. Frugal
engineering, addresses the billions of consumers at the bottom of the
pyramid who are quickly moving out of poverty in China, India, Brazil,
and other emerging nations.
innovation  C.K._Prahalad  Bottom_of_the_Pyramid  product_development  Tata  BRIC  low-cost  emerging_markets  trickle-up  reverse_innovation  jugaad  frugality  cost-cutting  supply_chain_squeeze 
august 2010 by jerryking
With all eyes on Africa, Canada looks the other way
May. 10, 2010 | The Globe and Mail | Campbell Clark
BRIC  Canada 
august 2010 by jerryking
There's a New Silk Road, and It Doesn't Lead to the U.S.
August 5, 2010 | BusinessWeek | By Simon Kennedy, Matthew
Bristow and Shamim Adam
Trade routes ("the new Silk Road"—a 21st-century version of the trade
routes that crisscrossed Asia almost 2,000 years ago, linking merchants
in China to their counterparts in India, Arabia, and the Roman Empire)
bring Brazilian buses to Egypt and Chinese trains to the Mideast
emerging_markets  multinationals  state_capitalism  South-South  China  India  Brazil  Embraer  BRIC 
august 2010 by jerryking
Off the Shelf - A War for Hearts and Minds, Economically Speaking - Review - NYTimes.com
June 4, 2010 | NYT | By DEVIN LEONARD. Review of Ian
Bremmer's “The End of the Free Market: Who Wins the War Between States
and Corporations?” (Portfolio, 230 pages)
book_reviews  BRIC  South_Korea  Turkey  South_Africa  state_capitalism 
june 2010 by jerryking
A special report on innovation in emerging markets: The world turned upside down
Apr 15th 2010 | From The Economist print edition. The United
Nations World Investment Report calculates that there are now around
21,500 multinationals based in the emerging world. The best of these,
such as India’s Bharat Forge in forging, China’s BYD in batteries and
Brazil’s Embraer in jet aircraft, are as good as anybody in the world.
The number of companies from Brazil, India, China or Russia on the
Financial Times 500 list more than quadrupled in 2006-08, from 15 to 62.
Brazilian top 20 multinationals more than doubled their foreign assets
in a single year, 2006.
innovation  emerging_markets  reverse_innovation  Bottom_of_the_Pyramid  BRIC  multinationals 
april 2010 by jerryking
Look out for well-informed shoppers in 2010
January 4, 2010 | The Globe and Mail | by Harvey Schachter.
Searching for stability; Reading the fine print; Maximum disclosure; The
devil wears packaging; Pay attention to emerging giants; Trickle-up
innovation; Retooling for an aging world; Life in real time;
Location-based everything; Visual fluency.
The continuing shift from words to images will accelerate. Communicators
across all sectors will need to find innovative visual ways to convey
information.
Harvey_Schachter  JWT  trends  location_based_services  aging  BRIC  luxury  visualization  infographics  Communicating_&_Connecting  jugaad  innovation  visual_culture  trickle-up  pay_attention 
january 2010 by jerryking
Serving the World's Poor, Profitably
Sept. 1, 2002 | Harvard Business Review | by C.K. Prahalad and Allen Hammond
C.K._Prahalad  BRIC  HBR  Bottom_of_the_Pyramid  filetype:pdf  media:document  low-income 
december 2009 by jerryking
Tech's Future
SEPTEMBER 27, 2004 | Business Week | by Steve Hamm. Developing
countries require new business strategies as well as new products. .. A
new class of businesses -- tech kiosk operators -- is emerging to
provide computing as a service. With cash often in short supply,
pay-as-you-go programs are not only boosting cell-phone usage but are
catching on with computers and Web access as well. When these
technologies cycle back into the mature markets, it could change
everything from pricing to product design. To succeed in the developing
world, devices and software have to be better in many ways: cheaper,
easier to use, extra-durable, more compact -- and still packed with
powerful features. The resulting improvements will ultimately benefit
everybody from New Delhi to New York.
HP  BRIC  C.K._Prahalad  Bottom_of_the_Pyramid  kiosks  new_businesses  new_products  pay-as-you-go  developing_countries 
december 2009 by jerryking
Emerging Markets, Emerging Giants
April 22, 2007 | New York Times | By WILLIAM J. HOLSTEIN. A
NEW wave of foreign competitive pressure is beginning to ripple through
the United States economy, from companies in emerging markets like
Brazil, Russia, India and China. “We are seeing a rebalancing of the
global economy back to where it was before the Industrial Revolution,
when China and India were major powers in the world.” says Antoine van
Agtmael, author of a new book, “The Emerging Markets Century: How a New
Breed of World-Class Companies Is Overtaking the World.” The emerging
multinationals haven’t had time to establish brand names, as Sony or LG
have done, but they will compensate for that. “They are either going to
buy American companies and use their brands or develop their own brand
names."
BRIC  globalization  KPMG  publishing  ripple_effects  Gadi_Prager  books  emerging_markets  multinationals  China  market_entry  mergers_&_acquisitions  M&A  brands  Industrial_Revolution  history  global_economy 
december 2009 by jerryking
Switch to the low-income customer
14-Nov-2005 | Financial Times | By Jeremy Grant. "When AG
Lafley came in [in 2000] and said, 'We're going to serve the world's
consumers', that led us to say, 'We don't have the product strategy, the
cost structure, to be effective in serving lower income consumers'.
"What's happened in the last five years has been one of the most
dramatic transformations I've seen in my career. We now have all of our
functions focused on that," says Mr Daley. P&G, the world's largest
consumer goods company, devotes about 30 %of its $1.9bn in annual
research and development spending to low-income markets, a 50 % increase
from 5 yrs. ago. Consumer research: spend time in consumers' homes to
gain insights into daily habits; Cost innovation: use proprietary
technology to design low-income products; Innovation productivity: use
"matchmakers" such as InnoCentive; Manufacturing efficiency: cut mfg.
costs by developing a network of suppliers in China, Brazil, Vietnam and
India.
P&G  BRIC  market_research  consumer_research  primary_field_research  customer_insights  innovation  Bottom_of_the_Pyramid  A.G._Lafley  InnoCentive  supply_chains  China  Brazil  Vietnam  India  observations  insights  cost-structure  jugaad  proprietary  behavioural  cost-cutting  match-making  CPG  low-income 
december 2009 by jerryking
Marketers Pursue the Shallow-Pocketed - WSJ.com
Jan. 26, 2007 | WSJ | By ANTONIO REGALADO. Interpublic Group's
McCann World Group in 2005 polled 15 of its major advertising clients.
These clients saw their biggest mktg. opportunities as being people
with low incomes....In recent years, mktg. to the poor has become a hot
subject. Univ. of Michigan economist C.K. Prahalad helped popularize the
idea with his 2004 book "The Fortune at the Bottom of the Pyramid,"
which argued big companies could profit and help the world's 4 billion
poor or low-income people by finding innovative ways to sell them soap
and refrigerators....Some companies have already been tackling
low-income mkts. by revamping distribution sys., or tweaking products so
that they are simpler or less expensive. E.g., Nestlé Brazil saw sales
of its Bono cookies jump 40% last year after it shrank the package to
140 g. from 200 g. and dropped the price... Illiteracy is one big
challenge...The strong role that community plays in poor neighborhoods
is of particular interest.
advertising_agencies  C.K._Prahalad  marketing  market_research  BRIC  Bottom_of_the_Pyramid  low-income 
december 2009 by jerryking
U.S. Start-Ups Set Sights on India - WSJ.com
SEPTEMBER 18, 2007 | Wall Street Journal | by REBECCA BUCKMAN.
An increasing number of high-tech start-ups are basing their operations
in the U.S. but setting their sights on Indian customers.
Rebecca_Buckman  start_ups  India  globalization  BRIC  international_marketing  Indians 
may 2009 by jerryking

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