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jerryking : bank_of_england   12

The Bank of England future-proofs itself – MainStreetEcon
June 26, 2018 | Financial Times | by mainstreetecon 14 hours ago14 hours ago

[Future-proofing is the process of anticipating the future and developing methods of minimizing the effects of shocks and stresses of future events. ]
anticipating  Bank_of_England  central_banks  frameworks  future-proofing  monetary_policy  policymakers 
june 2018 by jerryking
On the money: a history of the Bank of England
SEPTEMBER 1, 2017 by: John Plender, the FT columnist and author of ‘Capitalism: Money, Morals and Markets’ (Biteback)

Till Time’s Last Sand: A History of the Bank of England 1694-2013, by David Kynaston, Bloomsbury £35, 896 pages
An enduring theme is the friction that existed from the outset between the Bank and its main client, the government. The Bank’s original charter was granted so that it could provide finance for the Nine Years’ War against France. On each renewal, the terms were the subject of much haggling and in the interim the Bank was constantly pressed to advance more money than it felt prudent. ....Another constant theme is forgery and fraud, with some of the Bank’s most senior employees being caught with their fingers in the till. In marked contrast to today’s post-crisis financial world, punishment was harsh. Many miscreants were hanged at Tyburn while the lucky ones were condemned to transportation.

As the 19th century progresses, Kynaston’s story turns increasingly on the issue that preoccupied great Victorian writers on monetary policy such as Henry Thornton and Walter Bagehot: how to reconcile adherence to the gold standard with financial stability. Numerous financial crises, including those surrounding the rescue of Barings and the collapse of Overend Gurney and the City of Glasgow Bank, are retold here with panache.
Bank_of_England  history  central_banks  book_reviews  books  monetary_policy  slavery  Walter_Bagehot  financial_history  19th_century  Victorian  financial_crises 
september 2017 by jerryking
The Financial Bonanza of Big Data
March 7, 2013 | WSJ | By KENNETH CUKIER AND VIKTOR MAYER-SCHÖNBERGER:
Vast troves of information are manipulated and monetized, yet companies have a hard time assigning value to it...The value of information captured today is increasingly in the myriad secondary uses to which it is put—not just the primary purpose for which it was collected.[True, but this secondary or exhaust data has to be placed in the right context in order to maximize value]. In the past, shopkeepers kept a record of all transactions so that they could tally the sums at the end of the day. The sales data were used to understand sales. Only more recently have retailers parsed those records to look for business trends...With big data, information is more potent, and it can be applied to areas unconnected with what it initially represented. Health officials could use Google's history of search queries—for things like cough syrup or sneezes—to track the spread of the seasonal flu in the United States. The Bank of England has used Google searches as a leading indicator for housing prices in the United Kingdom. Other central banks have studied search queries as a gauge for changes in unemployment.

Companies world-wide are starting to understand that no matter what industry they are in, data is among their most precious assets. Harnessed cleverly, the data can unleash new forms of economic value.
massive_data_sets  Amazon  books  Google  branding  Facebook  Wal-Mart  Bank_of_England  data  data_driven  value_creation  JCK  exhaust_data  commercialization  monetization  valuations  windfalls  alternative_data  economic_data  tacit_data  interpretation  contextual  sense-making  tacit_knowledge 
march 2013 by jerryking
How to Be a Billionaire: Worry!
Monday, Feb. 05, 2001| TIME | By JOSHUA COOPER RAMO. For
George Soros, the problem is not how to make money. That's easy, he
believes. You do that by spotting mistakes. The problem is the mistakes
themselves. Soros thinks that our history, especially economic history,
is sculpted by blunders. It's a radical proposition, as if you suggested
that Botticelli's best art was the result of paint splatters. But Soros
is insistent: mistakes make history. They also make--and
destroy--fortunes. Soros, who made a fortune looking for and finding
mistakes, worries we are making one now. He picks up on these errors by
listening to his money. These days he doesn't like what he
hears..."George is signal," says a Fed adviser, referring to the high
noise-signal ratio among advice givers to Alan Greenspan.

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From Farhad Manjoo
Step 1: Worry. If you're an investor, employee, founder, tech journalist or in some other way connected to the tech business, worrying about the bubble is your best defense against the bubble. Worrying keeps you sharp. Worrying keeps magical thinking (i.e. happy talk) at bay. As in the 1990s, the tech industry is pushing grand, society-transforming novelties on the rest of the world. If you're not worried that some of these claims are crazy, you're not paying attention.
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George_Soros  Joshua_Cooper_Ramo  financial_history  wishful_thinking  Kissinger_Associates  pattern_recognition  patterns  moguls  lessons_learned  mistakes  Bank_of_England  financiers  negative_space  investors  signals  worrying  paranoia  human_errors  economic_history  happy_talk  pay_attention 
october 2009 by jerryking
1688 and All That - WSJ.com
May 29, 2007 | Wall Street Journal | Book review by Andrew
Roberts of Our First Revolution by Michael Barone.

Everything that flowed from the Whig victory of 1688--England's Glorious
Revolution--limited government, the Bank of England, tradable national
debt, triennial Parliaments, mercantilism, free enterprise, an
aggressively anti-French foreign policy, the union with Scotland,
eventually the Hanoverian Succession and the Industrial
Revolution--combined to make the English-speaking peoples powerful.
history  Bank_of_England  United_Kingdom  democracy  economy  revolution  glorious  the_Enlightenment  england  books  book_reviews 
april 2009 by jerryking

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