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jerryking : bob_rae   9

Notley can weather the storm in Alberta - The Globe and Mail
BOB RAE
Special to The Globe and Mail
Published Thursday, May. 07 2015

But 1990 in Ontario is not 2015 in Alberta. The economy truly cratered in Ontario: 300,000 jobs lost in just a few months; collapsing real estate prices; high interest rates and a strong dollar high; and a new free-trade agreement creating a “structural adjustment” that saw an avalanche of plant closings. It became clear that the reason for the early election was to get back in before the recession really started to bite. The downturn was the worst since 1930, and worse than anything faced in 2008-2009....Ms. Notley’s fiscal challenge is real, but does not compare to Ontario’s in those days...Her risks are pressures from within to push ahead with an ambitious agenda, and dealing with a business community and broader electorate that have their own preoccupations. But by being completely transparent about choices, and tempering unrealistic expectations and fears (as she is already doing), she can weather the storm.

Finding allies in the business community is key. There will be the diehards – and the blowhards – but beyond that, there are leaders who care about the province, who have deep roots in their communities, and who recognize that in Ms. Notley they have someone whose popularity and competence do not seem ephemeral. That process of reaching out is both public and private, and will require all her skills. But it can be done.

The harder task is dealing with expectations from the many groups and supporters whose connections to the NDP run deep....It ain’t easy.
Bob_Rae  Rachel_Notley  NDP  Ontario  '90s  expectations  Alberta  provincial_governments  elections 
may 2015 by jerryking
Lois Rae was the wife of a diplomat, mother of a premier - The Globe and Mail
SUSAN FERRIER MACKAY
Special to The Globe and Mail
Published Sunday, Dec. 28 2014
obituaries  Bob_Rae  inspiration  diplomacy  women 
december 2014 by jerryking
2014’s lessons for leaders: Don’t make assumptions, do make hard decisions - The Globe and Mail
BOB RAE
Special to The Globe and Mail
Published Friday, Dec. 26 2014,

Life has a way of lifting you by the lapels and giving you a good shake. Stuff happens, and when it does, it can throw all the steady paths predicted by pundits, pollsters and economic forecasters into the trash heap....Canadians are fixated on who the winners and losers of the "where will oil prices head" game ...but we need to lift our heads a bit. Russia’s falling ruble and the debt crisis of its elites and their companies have rightly grabbed headlines. But a couple of countries, notably Nigeria and Venezuela, are now in political crisis, and their very stability is at risk in the days ahead.

One of the implications of the 2008 world economic crisis is that regional and world institutions have much less room to manoeuvre and help sort things out. it will be harder for those agencies (EU, IMF) to do as much as is required. Stability doesn’t come cheap....a healthy dose of reality and skepticism is always a good idea. In a useful piece of advice, Rudyard Kipling reminded us that triumph and disaster are both imposters. People draw too many conclusions from current trends. They fail to understand that those trends can change. And that above all, they forget that events can get in the way....One clear lesson is for leaders everywhere to learn the importance of listening and engagement. The path to resolution of even the thorniest of problems...involves less rhetoric and bluster and a greater capacity to understand underlying interests and grievances. ... Engagement should never mean appeasement.
Bob_Rae  pundits  decision_making  leaders  unintended_consequences  predictions  WWI  humility  Toronto  traffic_congestion  crisis  instability  listening  engagement  unpredictability  Rudyard_Kipling  petro-politics  imposters  short-sightedness  amnesia_bias  interests  grievances  appeasement  hard_choices 
december 2014 by jerryking
Canada’s future depends on a new deal with First Nations - The Globe and Mail
Nov. 29 2013 |The Globe and Mail | Bob Rae.

Two underlying trends are now making the issue of genuine and deep reconciliation a matter of necessity rather than mere political choice: a continuing expansion of Canada’s resource industries to the heartland of traditional first nations’ territories, and a demographic revolution that is transforming Canada’s inner cities – first nations are no longer “out there”, they are now “right here”.

The challenge of reconciliation will require a clearer and stronger response from all sides. “Capacity building” is not a one way street. But there is an important paradigm shift underway: First Nations are taking an ownership stake in infrastructure, hydro, and other developments; companies are addressing issues of jobs, training, and equity participation; governments are beginning to address issues of revenue sharing.
aboriginals  economic_development  reconciliation  Bob_Rae  natural_resources  capacity-building  paradigm_shifts 
december 2013 by jerryking
Debate flares up over Northern Ontario's Ring of Fire - The Globe and Mail
JOSH WINGROVE

THUNDER BAY, ONT. — The Globe and Mail

Published Friday, Jul. 05 2013,

The so-called Ring of Fire is a 5,000-square-kilometre crescent of chromite, nickel, copper, zinc and gold – a vast deposit discovered a decade ago in remote Northern Ontario, much of it inaccessible by road and surrounded by nine Matawa First Nations. Interest in development took off when Mr. Gravelle held the mining portfolio from 2007 to 2011. /// The Ring of Fire’s proponents say it would be a jolt to the national economy. Tony Clement, the federal cabinet minister responsible for economic development in Northern Ontario, has estimated the deposit’s value at between $30-billion and $50-billion.
Ring_of_Fire  Ontario  Bob_Rae  aboriginals  economic_development  mining 
july 2013 by jerryking

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