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jerryking : brookings   7

Canada’s missed opportunity: Pot industry now being run out of the U.S.
JULY 3, 2019 | The Globe and Mail | by ANDREW WILLIS.

With Bruce Linton’s firing, it’s now all too clear that the biggest companies in Canadian cannabis are run out of New York and the state of Washington. An industry that this country seemed destined to lead when the federal Liberals legalized recreational cannabis last October 2018, is increasingly dominated by foreigners. ...... The opportunity to create global cannabis champions, based in Canada, appears to be vanishing. There should be a conversation around that issue, in political and business circles, before the biggest head offices all disappear... Linton ...lost his job because his visionary approach for Canopy Growth Corp. didn’t fit with the predictable, quarter-by-quarter profits demanded by Constellation Brands Inc....Linton’s departure is similar to what has played out at many startups that get sold to multinational companies. .....Even when we brought Constellation's $5-billion in, I knew, from that change of structure, there would likely be implications for management, but it was the right thing to do for the company.”... our entrepreneurs tend to sell successful startups at a relatively early stage, compared to jurisdictions such as the U.S. and Asia. . The trend, now happening even more rapidly in the cannabis sector, cuts into the potential future prosperity of this country......a study last year from the Washington-based Brookings Institution and the Martin Prosperity Institute at the University of Toronto’s Rotman School of Business – scaling up successful domestic businesses is essential to creating wealth and producing the next generation of corporate leaders. Canadians need to do better at turning their own companies into global champions. Silicon Valley generates enormous wealth out of a vibrant tech community. Why can’t Leamington, Ont., or Nanaimo, B.C., aspire to do the same in cannabis?..Canadian cannabis companies were created by government policy..... federal and provincial regulators granted the licences needed to grow and distribute their products – and local capital markets were receptive to financing them...CEOs, boards and domestic politicians should be asking if the country is best served by a laissez-faire approach to cannabis that created vibrant, valuable businesses following legalization in 2018, then quickly began handing over control of the sector....
Andrew_Willis  Bay_Street  Brookings  cannabis  Canopy_Growth  CEOs  Constellation_Brands  crossborder  departures  firings  global_champions  head_offices  home_grown  industrial_policies  Martin_Prosperity_Institute  missed_opportunities  sellout_culture 
july 2019 by jerryking
Trump Looks to Ex-Intelligence Officer, Putin Critic for National Security Council - WSJ
By FELICIA SCHWARTZ and PAUL SONNE
March 2, 2017

Ms. Hill is known in Washington policy circles for her clear-eyed view of Mr. Putin, viewing his background in the Soviet security services as critical to the way he approaches power politics and foreign policy. Ms. Hill’s selection was first reported by Foreign Policy.

“In the KGB, Putin learned how to probe people’s vulnerabilities, uncover their secrets, and use compromising information against them,” Ms. Hill wrote in a piece that appeared on Vox.com last summer. “In his view, other world leaders are essentially targets.”

Ms. Hill, currently at the Brookings Institution, previously served as an officer for the National Intelligence Council focusing on Russia and Eurasia. She co-wrote a book about Mr. Putin and his world view, and formerly worked at the Eurasia Foundation.
White_House  appointments  Europe  Russia  NSC  security_&_intelligence  women  U.S.foreign_policy  Brookings  think_tanks  Vladimir_Putin 
march 2017 by jerryking
A city divided: ‘I’ll pray for peace, but I won’t pray for Baltimore’ - The Globe and Mail
CRAIG OFFMAN
BALTIMORE — The Globe and Mail
Published Friday, May. 01 2015,

Baltimore’s unrest could be chalked up to the same kind of tensions that divide other U.S. cities: poor getting poorer, despair and racism, or all of those tied together.

Sandtown-Winchester is also part of a wider trend in which poverty is fanning out across the country. According to the centrist Brookings Institution, the population of census tracts where at least four in 10 people live at or below the federal poverty line – the people who face heightened risk factors such as violent crime, dilapidated housing and poor schooling – increased by 72 per cent between 2000 and 2012.

Like New Haven and Yale, or Harlem and Columbia, Baltimore is home to a wealthy, highly ranked university. Johns Hopkins (where I was once a graduate student) is a massive civic employer, and its presence is spreading across the city, a gentrification process that concerns many urban advocates.
Baltimore  Freddie_Gray  Johns_Hopkins  white_flight  urban  Brookings  gentrification  violent_crime  risk_factors 
may 2015 by jerryking
Think tanks need to show us the money - The Globe and Mail
KONRAD YAKABUSKI
The Globe and Mail
Published Monday, Feb. 09 2015

Like Brookings, almost of all of Canada’s leading think tanks claim to be independent and non-partisan. But while none – not even the Broadbent Institute – is directly affiliated with a political party, it’s not hard to discern an identifiable political agenda in the research they produce. American think tanks, says former think-tank founder David Callahan, “often operate as the motherships of ideological movements – weaving together a jumble of values and ideas into a coherent story and actionable agenda.” You could easily say the same of most of their Canadian counterparts.
Konrad_Yakabuski  think_tanks  lobbying  Brookings  institution-building  networks  institutions  political_infrastructure  transparency  political_advocacy  policy_analysis  policy  conflicts_of_interest  policymaking 
february 2015 by jerryking
Montreal and Toronto need a new breed of mayor
Jun. 20 2013 | The Globe and Mail | Konrad Yakabuski.

Canada’s two biggest cities are in the market for new leadership at a critical juncture. So-called “higher” levels of government are out of money and ideas and de facto city states are re-emerging as the real motors of national growth and innovation. Bruce Katz and Jennifer Bradley of the Brookings Institution point out that this “inversion of the hierarchy of power” presents cities with both challenges and opportunities. Higher levels of government are too broke, too slow and too politically divided to make transformative public policy, so visionary mayors must fill the void. The trend is yielding a new model of governance. “The metropolitan revolution,” they write in their new book of the same name, “is like our era: crowd-sourced rather than close-sourced, entrepreneurial rather than bureaucratic, networked rather than hierarchical.”...If inclusiveness is key to the metropolitan revolution, Toronto and Montreal have been shaped by history and demography to embody it. With half of its population born outside Canada, Toronto reverberates with the influences of an entire planet. Dundas Square on a Sunday afternoon is a chaotic free-for-all of colour, creed, generation and gender. There are few places in the world that could pull it off as peacefully....As Torontonians ponder a Ford-free future, they need to think about who can best lead such a diverse city as it stakes its claim to global greatness. Choosing an anti-development ideologue who puts poverty alleviation ahead of economic growth would be just as big a mistake as picking a crane-loving populist who doesn’t know his Weiwei from his WiFi.

The inversion of the power hierarchy promises to make the next mayors of Toronto and Montreal national leaders, not just local ones. To succeed, they will need to transcend outdated political cleavages and notions of progress.
Konrad_Yakabuski  Toronto  Montreal  anti-development  leadership  mayoral  networks  crowdsourcing  books  John_Tory  Brookings  voids  governance  cities  city-states  cash-strapped  vision 
june 2013 by jerryking
U.S. Relies on Spies for Hire to Sift Deluge of Intelligence - WSJ.com
June 10, 2013 | WSJ | By SIOBHAN GORMAN and DION NISSENBAUM.

The size and scale of private contracting for intelligence goes "well beyond the scope of anything the public is aware of or even imagines," said Peter Singer, director of the Center for 21st Century Security and Intelligence at the Brookings Institution.

About 1.2 million Americans hold top-secret clearances, the Director of National Intelligence reported this year. More than a third of those, 38%, are private contractors.

Nearly all of the private-sector growth followed the Sept. 11, 2001, attacks. Although some of the information on intelligence contractors is secret, NSA officials have said the number of its vendors grew to 6,000 in 2006 from 140 in 2001.

"It's hard to think of a single thing the intelligence community can do on its own anymore without a contractor being involved in some way," Mr. Singer said, "from the most mundane of data crunching to the pointy end of the black ops side."

Reliance on private contractors sprang from the need to quickly ramp up data collection and analysis after the 9/11 attacks, experts said.
security_&_intelligence  contractors  outsourcing  Washington_D.C.  information_overload  Brookings 
june 2013 by jerryking
Is the U.S. doomed to forsake Haiti once more?
Jan. 16, 2010 |Globe & Mail | by Konrad Yakabuski. “I'm
skeptical that any kind of religious belief system is antithetical to
development,” Raj Desai, a professor of international development at
Washington's Georgetown University and a senior fellow at the Brookings
Institution, insisted in an interview. “I'm more inclined to think that
the arrow runs the other way around. It is the lack of stability, the
lack of economic development, the chaos, the poverty, the corruption and
the lack of opportunities that are more likely to turn people to voodoo
rather than the other way around.”
Haiti  U.S.foreign_policy  history  David_Brooks  Konrad_Yakabuski  Brookings  belief_systems  hopelessness  international_development 
january 2010 by jerryking

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