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jerryking : cia   57

Whistle-Blower Is a C.I.A. Officer Who Was Detailed to the White House
Sept. 26, 2019 | The New York Times | By Adam Goldman, Michael S. Schmidt and Julian E. Barnes.

Agents, officers and analysts from the military, intelligence and law enforcement communities routinely work at the White House. Often, they work on the National Security Council or help manage secure communications, like calls between the president and foreign leaders.

The C.I.A. officer did not work on the communications team that handles calls with foreign leaders, according to the people familiar with his identity. He learned about Mr. Trump’s conduct “in the course of official interagency business,” according to the complaint, which was dotted with footnotes about machinations in Kiev and reinforced with public comments by senior Ukrainian officials.

Officials regularly shared information to “inform policymaking and analysis,” the complaint said. The complaint raises the prospect that the whistle-blower was not detailed to the White House either during the events in question or when he learned about them......The call with Mr. Zelensky was originally thought to be a routine matter, the complaint said, and the White House did not restrict it, meaning a number of officials and note takers listened.

But the whistle-blower said that afterward, White House officials “intervened to ‘lock down’ all records of the phone call,” putting them in a highly classified system meant for discussing covert actions. One White House official called that an abuse because the transcript contained no classified material.

Notes and rough transcripts of White House calls are typically stored on a computer system that allows senior officials in different departments and agencies to access them, to better coordinate policy.

Some White House colleagues told the whistle-blower that they were concerned they had witnessed “the president abuse his office for personal gain,” according to the complaint.

His complaint went beyond the call. During his time at the White House, the whistle-blower became deeply unnerved about how he believed Mr. Trump was broadly seeking to pressure the Ukrainian government to conduct investigations that could benefit him politically.

“Namely, he sought to pressure the Ukrainian leader to take actions to help the president’s 2020 re-election bid,” the complaint said of Mr. Trump.

After the call, multiple officials told the whistle-blower that future talks between Mr. Trump and Mr. Zelensky would depend on whether the Ukranians would “play ball” on the investigations he sought.

The whistle-blower, who lodged his concerns with the inspector general for the intelligence community, has identified at least a half-dozen government officials — including several who work for the White House — who he believes can substantiate his claims. The inspector general has interviewed some of them and found the whistle-blower’s claims credible.
Campaign_2020  CIA  Donald_Trump  impeachment  intelligence_analysts  Joe_Biden  policymaking  security_&_intelligence  Ukraine  whistleblowing  White_House 
16 days ago by jerryking
The Offbeat Genius of a Great American Spy - WSJ
By Sam Walker
Jan. 26, 2019

this experiment in deception and illusion became the central pillar of a unique operational mindset known as “the Moscow Rules.” By learning to outfox the KGB, the Moscow station not only connected with TRIGON, it scored some the biggest espionage coups in American history.
CIA  deception  espionage  illusions  obituaries  security_&_intelligence  spycraft 
january 2019 by jerryking
America’s intelligence agencies find creative ways to compete for talent - Spooks for hire
March 1, 2018 | Economist |

AMERICA’S intelligence agencies are struggling to attract and retain talent. Leon Panetta, a former Pentagon and CIA boss, says this is “a developing crisis”......The squeeze is tightest in cyber-security, programming, engineering and data science.....Until the agencies solve this problem, he says, they will fall short in their mission or end up paying more for expertise from contractors. By one estimate, contractors provide a third of the intelligence community’s workforce.....Part of the problem is the demand in the private sector for skills that used to be needed almost exclusively by government agencies, says Robert Cardillo, head of the National Geospatial-Intelligence Agency (NGA). To hire people for geospatial data analysis, he must now compete with firms like Fitbit, a maker of activity-measurement gadgets. .....The NGA now encourages certain staff to work temporarily for private firms while continuing to draw a government salary. After six months or a year, they return, bringing “invaluable” skills to the NGA, Mr Cardillo says. Firms return the favour by quietly lending the NGA experts in app development and database security. .....
war_for_talent  talent  data_scientists  CIA  security_&_intelligence  cyber_security  Leon_Panetta  SecDef  Pentagon  geospatial 
march 2018 by jerryking
Security Breach and Spilled Secrets Have Shaken the N.S.A. to Its Core
NOV. 12, 2017 | The New York Times | By SCOTT SHANE, NICOLE PERLROTH and DAVID E. SANGER.

“These leaks have been incredibly damaging to our intelligence and cyber capabilities,” said Leon E. Panetta, the former defense secretary and director of the Central Intelligence Agency. “The fundamental purpose of intelligence is to be able to effectively penetrate our adversaries in order to gather vital intelligence. By its very nature, that only works if secrecy is maintained and our codes are protected.”
adversaries  data_breaches  hacking  vulnerabilities  counterintelligence  counterespionage  moles  malware  ransomware  Fedex  Mondelez  Edward_Snowden  security_&_intelligence  Russia  Leon_Panetta  NSA  cyber_security  cyber_warfare  cyberweapons  tools  David_Sanger  SecDef  CIA 
november 2017 by jerryking
David Ignatius — Charlie Rose
11/07/2017 | Charlie Rose Show|

David Ignatius, columnist for The Washington Post, talks about Saudi Arabia, President Trump's China visit, and his new spy novel, Quantum Spy.
G-2  China  Saudi_Arabia  David_Ignatius  U.S.-China_relations  U.S.foreign_policy  Charlie_Rose  interviews  security_&_intelligence  authors  books  quantum_computing  novels  fiction  CIA 
november 2017 by jerryking
Hacks Raise Fear Over N.S.A.’s Hold on Cyberweapons - The New York Times
By NICOLE PERLROTH and DAVID E. SANGER JUNE 28, 2017

The Petya ransomware attack....was built on cyberweapons (i.e. hacking tools that exploited vulnerabilities in Microsoft software) stolen from the NSA in 2016 by Shadow Brokers and made public in April 2017. Now those weapons are being deployed against various U.S. partners include the United Kingdom and Ukraine.....there is growing concern that United States intelligence agencies have rushed to create digital weapons that they cannot keep safe from adversaries or disable once they fall into the wrong hands..... the government “employs a disciplined, high-level interagency decision-making process for disclosure of known vulnerabilities” in software, “unlike any other country in the world.”....Officials fret that the potential damage from the Shadow Brokers leaks could go much further, and the agency’s own weaponry could be used to destroy critical infrastructure in allied nations or in the United States.

“Whether it’s North Korea, Russia, China, Iran or ISIS, almost all of the flash points out there now involve a cyber element,” Leon E. Panetta, the former defense secretary and Central Intelligence Agency chief.....viruses can suddenly mutate into other areas you didn’t intend, more and more,” Mr. Panetta said. “That’s the threat we’re going to face in the near future.”..... ransomware that recently gained the most attention in the Ukraine attack is believed to have been a smoke screen for a deeper assault aimed at destroying victims’ computers entirely. .....Mr. Panetta was among the officials warning years ago of a “cyber Pearl Harbor” that could bring down the American power grid. But he and others never imagined that those same enemies might use the N.S.A.’s own cyberweapons.....rogue actors actors, like North Korea and segments of the Islamic State, who have access to N.S.A. tools who don’t care about economic and other ties between nation states,”.....So long as flaws in computer code exist to create openings for digital weapons and spy tools, security experts say, the N.S.A. is not likely to stop hoarding software vulnerabilities any time soon.
adversaries  CIA  computer_viruses  cyberattacks  cyberthreats  cyberweapons  David_Sanger  exploits  hackers  Leon_Panetta  malware  NSA  North_Korea  Pentagon  power_grid  ransomware  rogue_actors  security_&_intelligence  SecDef  vulnerabilities 
june 2017 by jerryking
C.I.A. Names the ‘Dark Prince’ to Run Iran Operations, Signaling a Tougher Stance
JUNE 2, 2017 | The New York Times | By MATTHEW ROSENBERG and ADAM GOLDMAN

Michael D’Andrea, has a new job. He is running the C.I.A.’s Iran operations, according to current and former intelligence officials, an appointment that is the first major sign that the Trump administration is invoking the hard line the president took against Iran during his campaign......Mr. D’Andrea took over the agency’s Counterterrorism Center in early 2006 and spent the next nine years directing the hunt for militants around the world........Iran has been one of the hardest targets for the C.I.A. The agency has extremely limited access to the country — no American embassy is open to provide diplomatic cover — and Iran’s intelligence services have spent nearly four decades trying to counter American espionage and covert operations.......Mr. Trump has appointed to the National Security Council hawks eager to contain Iran and push regime change, the groundwork for which would most likely be laid through C.I.A. covert action......Lt. Gen. H. R. McMaster, the national security adviser, was an infantry commander during the early years of the war in Iraq, and he believes that Iranian agents who were aiding Iraqi insurgents were responsible for the deaths of a number of his soldiers. Derek Harvey, the senior director for the Middle East at the council, is also considered an Iran hawk.....
appointments  Iran  covert_operations  CIA  APNSA  security_&_intelligence  Al_Qaeda  NSC  H.R._McMaster  counterterrorism 
june 2017 by jerryking
Killing C.I.A. Informants, China Crippled U.S. Spying Operations - The New York Times
By MARK MAZZETTI, ADAM GOLDMAN, MICHAEL S. SCHMIDT and MATT APUZZOMAY 20, 2017

The Chinese government systematically dismantled C.I.A. spying operations in the country starting in 2010, killing or imprisoning more than a dozen sources over two years and crippling intelligence gathering there for years afterward.

Current and former American officials described the intelligence breach as one of the worst in decades. ..... The C.I.A. considers spying in China one of its top priorities, but the country’s extensive security apparatus makes it exceptionally hard for Western spy services to develop sources there.

At a time when the C.I.A. is trying to figure out how some of its most sensitive documents were leaked onto the internet two months ago by WikiLeaks, and the F.B.I. investigates possible ties between President Trump’s campaign and Russia, the unsettled nature of the China investigation demonstrates the difficulty of conducting counterespionage investigations into sophisticated spy services like those in Russia and China.....As more and more sources vanished, the operation took on increased urgency. Nearly every employee at the American Embassy was scrutinized, no matter how high ranking. Some investigators believed the Chinese had cracked the encrypted method that the C.I.A. used to communicate with its assets. Others suspected a traitor in the C.I.A., a theory that agency officials were at first reluctant to embrace — and that some in both agencies still do not believe.
CIA  China  espionage  security_&_intelligence  informants  counterintelligence  moles  counterespionage  covert_operations 
may 2017 by jerryking
What Is the President’s Daily Brief? - The New York Times
By CHARLIE SAVAGEDEC. 12, 2016

The President’s Daily Brief is a summary of high-level intelligence and analysis about global hot spots and national security threats written by the Office of the Director of National Intelligence. While the intelligence community produces many reports and assessments, the P.D.B. is written specifically for the president and his top advisers....The intelligence community tailors the P.D.B. to each president’s interests and style of absorbing information. At times, the briefing has included a “deep dive” into a specific question that a president may have asked or information that briefers believed he needed to know, such as the early August 2001 briefing Mr. Bush received at his Texas ranch reporting that Osama Bin Laden was determined to strike inside the United States. After the Sept. 11, 2001, attacks, Mr. Bush received a supplement called the “threat matrix,” which listed more detailed intelligence about potential terrorist plans. Under Mr. Obama, the brief has taken on some new topics and different forms, including a periodic update on cyberthreats against the United States. ....getting the briefing every day is not strictly necessary, especially if Mr. Trump delegates substantial amounts of authority to his subordinates. But they stress that regular briefings are still important because it is helpful in a fast-moving crisis if a president already has a baseline of knowledge about topics, such as a foreign leader’s thinking and military abilities. Also, briefings permit a president to quiz briefers on inconsistencies and questions of fact or interpretation that form the basis for the most important national security decisions — those only the president can make.
cyberthreats  PDB  security_&_intelligence  CIA  memoranda  White_House  hotspots  threats  ODNI  baselines  inconsistencies  interpretation  decision_making 
december 2016 by jerryking
U.S. Fears Data Stolen by Chinese Hacker Could Identify Spies - The New York Times
By MARK MAZZETTI and DAVID E. SANGER JULY 24, 2015

the hackers — who government officials are now reluctant to say publicly were working for the Chinese government — could still use the vast trove of information to identify American spies by a process of elimination. By combining the stolen data with information they have gathered over time, they said, the hackers can use “big data analytics” to draw conclusions about the identities of operatives....The C.I.A. and other agencies typically post their spies in American embassies, where the officers pose as diplomats working on political affairs, agricultural policy or other issues. The American Embassy in Beijing has long housed one of the largest C.I.A. stations in the world, with intelligence officers gathering information on China’s political maneuvering, economic development and military modernization.

Several current and former officials said that even if the identities of the agency officers were not in the personnel office’s database, Chinese intelligence operatives could run searches through the database on everyone granted visas to work at American diplomatic outposts in China. If any of the names are not found in the stolen files, those individuals could be suspected as spies by a process of elimination.
Chinese  data_breaches  China  hacks  CIA  espionage  security_&_intelligence  cyber_warfare  cyber_security  massive_data_sets  David_Sanger 
july 2015 by jerryking
Mastering the Art of Problem Solving
When President Bill Clinton chose to intervene in the Somali civil war in 1993, the Battle of Mogadishu resulted in thousands of Somali citizens killed, two American Black Hawk helicopters shot down,…

WHAT ABOUT THE DATA?
Increasing amounts of data can be unmanageable, and the problem of sorting through data overloads may only worsen in this digital era. Rather than looking at each bit of information as a discrete data point, we want to look at our drivers and sort the data according to which driver it supports--on other words, sort the data into each of the half-dozen or so driver categories, so analysts have few piles to deal with rather than a thousand discrete data points.
decision_making  howto  problem_solving  problem_framing  security_&_intelligence  CIA  books  information_overload  analysis  interviews  critical_thinking  book_reviews  Philip_Mudd  frameworks  insights  sorting  analysts  thinking_backwards  problem_definition  intelligence_analysts 
may 2015 by jerryking
C.I.A. Officers and F.B.I. Agents, Meet Your New Partner: The Analyst - NYTimes.com
MARCH 26, 2015 | NYT |By SCOTT SHANE.

As the FBI & CIA confront an evolving terrorist threat, cyberattacks and other challenges, both are reorganizing in ways intended to empower analysts. That involves the delicate job of meshing the very different cultures of the streetwise agent and the brainy analyst, who reads secret dispatches, pores over intercepted communications, absorbs news media accounts and digests it all.
CIA  FBI  organizational_culture  security_&_intelligence  information_overload  intelligence_analysts  data  analysts  cyberattacks 
april 2015 by jerryking
‘The Director,’ by David Ignatius, a Novel About the C.I.A.
June 3, 2014 | NYTimes.com |By MICHIKO KAKUTANI.

Mr. Ignatius writes that “The Director” is “ultimately about American intelligence in the age of WikiLeaks, and whether it can adapt to a more open digital world and still do the hard work of espionage.” And the novel does provide a harrowing sense of the vulnerability of governments and ordinary people alike to cybercrime, surveillance and digital warfare in this day when almost anything and everything can be stolen or destroyed with some malicious pieces of code and a couple clicks of a mouse.....giving an intimate sense of American intelligence operations in a post-Sept. 11 world, and puts them in historical perspective with operations from the World War II and Cold War eras. He also provides a detailed, energetically researched account of how hackers inside and outside the government operate: how malware and back doors and worms actually work, how easily security and privacy shields can be breached, how relatively defenseless many financial networks are.
back_doors  books  book_reviews  CIA  cyber_security  cyber_warfare  David_Ignatius  espionage  exploits  fiction  hackers  hard_work  malware  security_&_intelligence  software_bugs  vulnerabilities  WikiLeaks 
june 2014 by jerryking
Unlocking Secrets, if Not Its Own Value
MAY 31, 2014 | NYTimes.com |By QUENTIN HARDY.

Founded in 2004, in part with $2 million from the CIA’s venture capital arm, Palantir makes software that has illuminated terror networks and figured out safe driving routes through a war-torn Baghdad. It has also tracked car thieves, helped in disaster recovery and traced salmonella outbreaks. United States attorneys deployed its technology against the hedge fund SAC Capital, which was also an early investor in the company....Palantir’s software has been used at JPMorgan Chase to spot cyberfraud and to sell foreclosed homes; at Bridgewater Associates to help figure out investments for its $157 billion under management, and at Hershey to increase chocolate profits. The technology is complex, but the premise is simple: The software consumes huge amounts of data — from local rainfall totals to bank transactions — mashes it together and makes conclusions based on those unlikely combinations. Where is a terrorist attack likely to occur? What is a bad financial bet?...As Palantir expands into offering services to the private sector — now perhaps 70 percent of its business — Mr. Karp’s worry is losing control of what happens with its software....“The thing Alex worries about the most is they have a culture that’s hard to sustain as it grows,” said Mr. Carville, the Democratic consultant. “I take walks around Stanford with him, and he talks about it: ‘If we become something besides Palantir, what are we?’ ”...Palantir’s founders started with an idea from PayPal. At one point, PayPal was losing the equivalent of 150 percent of its revenue to stolen credit card numbers. It figured out how computers could spot activity — like a flurry of payments to a brand new account — at a global scale. ...“The idea was to pick one bank, and the rest would follow,” Mr. Ovitz said. JPMorgan was the first. Much as Palantir figured out navigating Baghdad by analyzing recent roadside attacks, satellite images and moon phases, it derived home-sale prices by looking at school enrollments, employment trends and retail sales. Data that JPMorgan thought would take two years to integrate was put into action in eight days.

JPMorgan still uses Palantir for cybersecurity, fraud detection and other work, loading half a terabyte of data onto a Palantir system each day, according to a Palantir video. ...Government clients also struggle with a data explosion. “Everything becomes more difficult, the more crime becomes global, the more state actors are involved, the more trades there are around the globe,” said Preet Bharara, United States attorney for the Southern District of New York. “It’s malpractice to have records and not search them.” He has used Palantir for several cases, including the SAC investigation....Palantir is now Palo Alto’s biggest tenant after Stanford, occupying about 250,000 square feet in downtown buildings, which hold many of Palantir’s 1,500 employees. Contracts around the world have surged as everyone’s data increases in size and diversity.
Palantir  Silicon_Valley  CIA  security_&_intelligence  software  Michael_Ovitz  organizational_culture  massive_data_sets  Peter_Thiel  data  information_overload  cyber_security  fraud_detection  platforms  actionable_information  JPMorgan_Chase 
june 2014 by jerryking
A Russian GPS Using U.S. Soil Stirs Spy Fears - NYTimes.com
By MICHAEL S. SCHMIDT and ERIC SCHMITT
Published: November 16, 2013
U.S.  GPS  Russia  espionage  CIA  space  satellites 
november 2013 by jerryking
Blackwater's Founder Blames U.S. for Its Troubles - WSJ.com
Nov. 17, 2013 | WSJ |By Dion Nissenbaum.

Now, Mr. Prince says, he is done working for t he U.S. government. He has invested millions in setting up Frontier Resource Group, a private-equity firm that operates in more than a dozen African countries. The firm is building an oil refinery in South Sudan, owns a cement factory in the Democratic Republic of Congo, conducts aerial gas and oil surveys across the continent, and is looking at taking over idle oil wells damaged by insurgents in Nigeria, he said.
security_&_intelligence  entrepreneur  private_equity  memoirs  oil_refiners  CIA  Blackwater  books  drones  covert_operations  Africa  political_risk  frontier_markets  natural_resources  Leon_Panetta 
november 2013 by jerryking
Hillary Clinton’s Diplomatic Legacy
February 11, 2013 | The New Yorker | by George Packer.

The criticism that there is no encompassing “Obama doctrine” misses the point. Geopolitics today is too complex, messy, and various to be bent to America’s will by an overarching doctrine like containment, or a massive initiative like the Marshall Plan, or a single breakthrough like Nixon’s trip to China. A doctrine was what put the country in a deep hole; climbing out required restraint, flexibility, and opportunism. A first-term Secretary of State with one grand strategic vision wouldn’t have matched the demands of the moment, which called for a fox, not a hedgehog....The standard debates in American foreign policy—realism vs. idealism, heavy footprint vs. light footprint—don’t get to the heart of the problem with Obama’s foreign policy. It’s not that diplomatic engagement is the wrong approach; it’s just that the President’s first four years have given us the idea of diplomacy more than the thing itself. In a forthcoming book, “The Dispensable Nation: American Foreign Policy in Retreat,” Vali Nasr, a former adviser under Hillary Clinton and the late Richard Holbrooke, argues that, from North Africa to Afghanistan and Pakistan, the White House has relied too much on the military and the C.I.A. (mainly in the form of drones) to guide policy: “These agencies’ solutions were not, and could never be, a substitute for the type of patient, long-range, credible diplomacy that garners the respect of our allies and their support when we need it.” In Nasr’s view, a White House that feared being called soft and wanted to keep intractable foreign entanglements out of the news turned to Clinton only after things had fallen apart, as in Pakistan at the end of 2011, when she moved to repair a relationship that had degenerated into outright antagonism.

Obama and Clinton wanted to “pivot” away from the Middle East, toward the Pacific, but a bloody hand keeps reaching out to pull America back.
George_Packer  George_Marshall  U.S.foreign_policy  legacies  diplomacy  Middle_East  Mideast_Peace  Obama  Hillary_Clinton  geopolitics  Pakistan  complexity  messiness  restraint  flexibility  opportunism  U.S._State_Department  grand_strategy  Vali_Nasr  CIA  drones  Marshall_Plan  foxes  hedgehogs  long-range  books 
february 2013 by jerryking
The Mystery of Mandela's Arrest - WSJ.com
December 21, 2012 | WSJ | By PETER WONACOTT
The Mystery of Mandela's Arrest
His capture in 1962 changed South Africa's history. But who tipped off the police?
Nelson_Mandela  South_Africa  CIA 
december 2012 by jerryking
CIA Director Petraeus Resigns Due to Extramarital Affair - WSJ.com
November 9, 2012 | WSJ | By NEIL KING JR. And CAROL E. LEE.
CIA's Petraeus Resigns Due to Extramarital Affair
CIA  David_Petraeus  relationships 
november 2012 by jerryking
Leak Offers Look at Efforts by U.S. to Spy on Israel - NYTimes.com
Sept. 5, 2011 | NYT | By SCOTT SHANE. Shamai Leibowitz, an FBI
translator, sentenced to 20 mths in prison last yr. for leaking
classified info. to a blogger. The info. detailed concerns re.Israel’s
efforts to influence Congress & public opinion, & fears that
Israel might strike nuclear facilities in Iran...While the U.S. govt.
routinely eavesdrops on some embassies inside the U.S., intelligence
collection against allies is always politically delicate, especially one
as close as Israel...The FBI listens in on foreign embassies &
officials in the U.S. chiefly to track foreign spies, though any
intelligence it obtains on other matters is passed on to the CIA &
other agencies. The intercepts are carried out by the FBI’s Operational
Tech. Division, according to Matthew Aid, a writer who describes the
monitoring in a book, “Intel Wars,” to be published in January...Treated
as highly classified by the FBI, the fact that the U.S. spies on Israel
is taken for granted by intelligence experts.
espionage  security_&_intelligence  Israeli  CIA  FBI  NSA  translations  intercepts  Israel  eavesdropping  books  covert_operations  wiretaps 
september 2011 by jerryking
The Mission to Get Osama Bin Laden
August 8, 2011 |The New Yorker | by Nicholas Schmidle.
OBL  covert_operations  seals  CIA  Pakistan 
august 2011 by jerryking
Bin Laden Raid in Pakistan Shows New Trust Between CIA, U.S. Special Forces - WSJ.com
MAY 23, 2011 | WSJ | By SIOBHAN GORMAN And JULIAN E. BARNES
Spy, Military Ties Aided bin Laden Raid
CIA  U.S._Special_Forces  Pakistan  OBL  security_&_intelligence 
may 2011 by jerryking
Crovitz: Unilateral Information Disarmament - WSJ.com
MAY 9, 2011
Unilateral Information Disarmament
Could Osama have been found under Obama's rules?
By L. GORDON CROVITZ

"The war on terror is an arms race for information. Terrorists must keep
their plans, weapons and sleeper cells secret. Prevention requires
knowing about plans before they are carried out....To his credit, CIA
Director Leon Panetta acknowledges that now-prohibited interrogations
played a key role. Mr. Panetta last week said that the agency had "used
these enhanced interrogation techniques against some of these
detainees," adding that "whether we would have gotten the same
information through other approaches I think is always going to be an
open question." Mr. Panetta's immediate predecessor, Michael Hayden, has
estimated that half the agency's knowledge about al Qaeda came from
interrogations of several dozen terrorists.
arms_race  OBL  L._Gordon_Crovtiz  information  Leon_Panetta  CIA  interrogations 
may 2011 by jerryking
CIA spied on bin Laden from safe house -
Thursday, May , The Washington Post By Greg Miller,
Pakistan  OBL  CIA 
may 2011 by jerryking
In Pakistan, no more secrets -
May, 4, 2011 | The Washington Post| By Vali Nasr, The CIA
shattered Pakistan’s intelligence establishment’s confidence with its
ability to hunt and kill bin Laden right under the nose of the ISI. Yet
the ISI’s real worry is that the next item on the CIA’s agenda could be
one of the two Taliban leaders the .S. holds most directly responsible
for the insurgency in Afghanistan, and who are believed to be hiding in
Pakistan: Mullah Omar or Sirajuddin Haqqani, head of his eponymous
terrorist network. And if the CIA found bin Laden, then it could
probably find everything it wants to know about Pakistan’s nuclear
arsenal.

It has become clear that since 2009 the CIA has built an infrastructure
of intelligence gathering and operational capability that opened up
Pakistan’s underworld of jihadists, spooks and terrorists. There are no
more secrets. Worse yet, the United States can act at will to kill,
capture or destroy in Pakistan — even in an army town.
Afghanistan  CIA  covert_operations  duplicity  instrumentation_monitoring  ISI  OBL  Pakistan  security_&_intelligence  Taliban 
may 2011 by jerryking
Exposed CIA Station Chief Exits Pakistan - WSJ.com
DECEMBER 18, 2010 | WSJ | By ADAM ENTOUS. CIA Station Chief, His Cover Blown, Departs Pakistan
Pakistan  security_&_intelligence  CIA  drones  ISI 
december 2010 by jerryking
Secret Assault on Terrorism Widens on Two Continents - NYTimes.com
August 14, 2010 | New York Times | By SCOTT SHANE, MARK
MAZZETTI and ROBERT F. WORTH
"The attack offered a glimpse of the Obama administration’s shadow war
against Al Qaeda and its allies. In roughly a dozen countries — from the
deserts of North Africa, to the mountains of Pakistan, to former Soviet
republics crippled by ethnic and religious strife — the United States
has significantly increased military and intelligence operations,
pursuing the enemy using robotic drones and commando teams, paying
contractors to spy and training local operatives to chase terrorists."
Yemen  CIA  counterterrorism  Obama  al-Qaeda  contractor  security_&_intelligence  drones  covert_operations  militaries 
august 2010 by jerryking
Richard Posner: What Our Intelligence Agencies Could Learn from Silicon Valley
MAY 28, 2010 | WSJ.com | By RICHARD A. POSNER. What Our
Intelligence Agencies Could Learn from Silicon Valley
The clamor to increase the power of the Director of National
Intelligence is mistaken. We need less hierarchy and centralization.
security_&_intelligence  organizational_design  CIA  Richard_A._Posner  Silicon_Valley 
may 2010 by jerryking
Technology Is Central To CIA's Strategic Plan - WSJ.com
APRIL 26, 2010 | Wall Street Journal | By SIOBHAN GORMAN.
The CIA announced a five-year strategic plan that would invest heavily
in new technologies to combat non-traditional threats like cyber attacks
from overseas and gain better intelligence on rogue states like Iran.
... Mr. Panetta released his five-year plan in remarks to agency
employees. "We govern either by leadership or by crisis," he said.
"That's why we're taking a hard look at future challenges, and what we
want our agency to look like five years from now."
threats  adaptability  instability  unpredictability  rogue_actors  security_&_intelligence  CIA  strategic_planning  cyber_warfare  asymmetrical  Iran  Africa  Pakistan  innovation  Pentagon  forward_looking  leadership  strategic_thinking  decentralization  non-traditional  technology  Leon_Panetta 
may 2010 by jerryking
A Perfectly Framed Assassination in Dubai - WSJ.com
FEBRUARY 27, 2010 | Wall Street Journal | by Robert Baer.
Stepped-up surveillance technology may be tipping the scales in the
cat-and-mouse game between spies and their targets--comment on the
current state of spycraft.
targeted_assassinations  spycraft  Mossad  Hamas  Dubai  CIA  security_&_intelligence  Israel  covert_operations 
march 2010 by jerryking
The Meaning of al Qaeda's Double Agent - WSJ.com
JANUARY 7, 2010 | Wall Street Journal | by Reuel Marc Gerecht.
The jihadists are showing impressive counterintelligence ability that
the CIA seems to have underestimated.
Jihad  security_&_intelligence  Afghanistan  counterintelligence  CIA  al-Qaeda 
january 2010 by jerryking
CIA Blast Blamed On Double Agent - WSJ.com
JANUARY 5, 2010 | Wall Street Journal | By SIOBHAN GORMAN, ANAND GOPAL and YOCHI J. DREAZEN
security_&_intelligence  Afghanistan  CIA 
january 2010 by jerryking
Risky business
Apr 24, 2006 | Federal Computer Week. Falls Church: Vol. 20, Iss. 12; pg. 18, 4 pgs | by Aliya Sternstein.
In-Q-Tel  venture_capital  R&D  CIA 
june 2009 by jerryking

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