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jerryking : canada150   8

Peter Mansbridge anchors his final edition of CBC’s The National - The Globe and Mail
Jun. 30, 2017

Last September, when Mansbridge announced his retirement, I wrote a column with the headline It’s About Time: We’ve Put Up With Mansbridge And His Pompous Ilk For Too Long. It acknowledged at the start that it might seem ungracious and harsh.

It argued against the traditional anchor position, which Mansbridge has embodied, and declared that the reverence for the job is outdated and, essentially, redundant.

About half the readers thought it too harsh and about half applauded the content. It caused some hurt feelings. Sometimes a critic does that, expressing the unsentimental view.

Oddly enough, CBC seems to be agreeing with the views expressed about the traditional anchor role and is moving away, post-Mansbridge, to a multihost format rather than anchoring The National in one middle-aged man who delivers the news.

Whatever the new format might be, Peter Mansbridge will be missed by many. Understandably, given his skills and achievements.

Cheers, Pastor, and may the retirement be pleasant and fruitful.
Peter_Mansbridge  farewells  retirement  CBC  unsentimental  television  journalists  Canada150  John_Doyle 
july 2017 by jerryking
In 1967, the birth of modern Canada - The Globe and Mail
JAN. 02, 2017 | THE GLOBE AND MAIL | DOUG SAUNDERS |

1967 is the hinge upon which modern Canadian history turns and, in certain respects, the key to understanding the challenges of the next half-century.

Today, we live in the country shaped by the decisions and transformations of 1967, far more than by the events of 1867.

Let me make the case, then, that 1967 was Canada’s first good year. We should spend this year celebrating not the 150 th year of Confederation, but the 50th birthday of the new Canada.

But let me also make the case that our conventional story about the birth of second-century Canada is largely wrong. We like to believe that starting in the late 1960s, a series of political decisions, parliamentary votes, court rulings and royal commissions descended upon an innocent, paternalistic, resource-economy Canada and forced upon it an awkward jumble of novelties: non-white immigration, bilingualism, multiculturalism, refugees, indigenous nationhood, liberation of women and gays, the seeds of free trade, individual rights, religious diversity.

But the explosions of official novelty that were launched in and around 1967 weren’t a cause; they were an effect of profound changes that had taken place in Canadians themselves during the two decades after the war, in their thinking and their composition and their attitude toward their country, in Quebec and English Canada and in indigenous communities.


There is a solid line leading from the events of 1967 to the Charter of Rights and Freedoms in 1982: It was impossible to have a Canada of multiple peoples, as we discovered was necessary in the late 1960s, without having a Canada of individual people and their rights.

....Individual rights, Quebecois consciousness, indigenous shared-sovereignty status and cultural plurality weren’t the only inevitable outcomes of the 1967 moment. What Canada witnessed over the next two decades was a self-reinforcing spiral of events that often sprung directly from the centennial-era awakening of a postcolonial consciousness.
Doug_Saunders  anniversaries  1967  nostalgia  nationalism  '60s  turning_points  centenaries  pride  Pierre_Berton  Canada  Canada150  national_identity  aboriginals  postcolonial  symbolism  John_Diefenbaker  Lester_Pearson  multiculturalism  Quebecois  Quiet_Revolution  monoculturalism  land_claim_settlements  immigration  royal_commissions  sesquicentennial  Charter_of_Rights_and_Freedoms  Confederation  retrospectives 
january 2017 by jerryking
With the big 150 in sight, Canada is ready to party - The Globe and Mail
LAWRENCE MARTIN
Special to The Globe and Mail
Published Tuesday, May 10, 2016

This country’s 100th anniversary, marked by Expo 67, ranks as one of the high points in the story of Canadian unity. Though few trumpets are sounding, we shouldn’t be surprised if the 150th, which comes next year, outdoes it.

The Canadian fabric is more tightly woven than it was a half-century ago. On the stability scale, few countries rank higher. To be flattered, we need only observe the escalation of ethnic nationalism in Europe and the surge of divisive nativist passions in the United States.

After our centennial celebrations, we experienced those types of tensions here. Ethnic nationalism escalated in Quebec and regional tensions magnified in the West. Instability, particularly in Quebec, was palpable over a three-decade period. Today, the separatist threat is about as lethal as the collywobbles. The Parti Québécois’s most recent show of enfeeblement saw its leader..... A unified country is more capable of meeting big challenges. On the eve of its 150th birthday, Canadian unity has rarely, if ever, been stronger.
Lawrence_Martin  anniversaries  Canada  national_unity  Expo_67  history  Canadian  nation_building  national_identity  Canada150  one-time_events 
may 2016 by jerryking

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