recentpopularlog in

jerryking : charles_de_gaulle   3

Jean-Jacques Susini, Right-Wing Extremist in Algeria, Dies at 83 - The New York Times
By RICHARD SANDOMIR JULY 14, 2017

Raoul Salan, the group’s commander, was a highly decorated French general who had turned against de Gaulle and participated in a failed military coup in Algeria in April 1961. Paul Henissart wrote in his book “Wolves in the City: The Death of French Algeria” (1970) that Mr. Susini regarded Mr. Salan as a “tactician rather than a strategist,” who was better at exploiting circumstances than creating them.

“This seemed a welcome state of affairs to Susini, whose limitless ambition was to create, himself, an entirely new set of circumstances, as part of what he believed was a revolution,” Mr. Henissart wrote......Independence finally came to Algeria in 1962, but Mr. Susini was nonetheless involved in plotting to kill de Gaulle later that year and again in 1964. Details of the first attempt — in which de Gaulle’s Citroen was raked by machine gun fire outside Paris but he was unharmed — were used by the novelist Frederick Forsyth to open his 1971 thriller, “The Day of the Jackal.” The film adapted from the novel two years later opened the same way, with de Gaulle and his motorcade attacked by gunmen.

Asked by Mr. Malye why he tried to assassinate de Gaulle even after the war in Algeria had ended, Mr. Susini said it was to hold him responsible for the massacre of people “slaughtered like rabbits” and for the exodus of one million European Algerians. Mr. Susini had separately said that the Secret Army first began plotting de Gaulle’s murder in late 1961.
'60s  Algeria  assassinations  Charles_de_Gaulle  exodus  extremism  France  obituaries  right-wing  terrorism 
july 2017 by jerryking
The youth and confidence are gone, but 40 years later, Canada's still working - The Globe and Mail
ROY MACGREGOR
From Tuesday's Globe and Mail
Published Tuesday, Jan. 09, 2007

There was, of course, Expo 67 and the opening of the National Arts Centre, but there were also the Centennial Projects, the commission overseeing the country's 100th birthday agreeing to underwrite some 2,860 of them.

"The construction industry and virtually every community across the nation [as well as Montreal]benefited from Centennial projects," The Beaver reported a decade ago on the effect of Expo 67. "568 recreational centres, 538 parks, 442 community halls, 188 municipal buildings, 144 libraries, museum and art galleries, as well as seven theatres, one UFO landing pad, and one statue of a leprechaun riding a turtle."

Pierre Berton called 1967 The Last Good Year. It wasn't perfect -- French President Charles de Gaulle's visit was a fiasco and the Confederation Train was met by a small riot when it reached Montreal -- but it was probably as close to perfect as this rocky little-big country has ever been.

"A better world seemed to beckon," Berton wrote in his 1997 book on the Centennial. " . . . In 1967 we looked forward with anticipation. In 1997 we look backwards with regret."
retrospectives  1967  Expo_67  Canada  Pierre_Berton  Charles_de_Gaulle 
july 2017 by jerryking
Why Machiavelli Still Matters - NYTimes.com
By JOHN SCOTT and ROBERT ZARETSKY
Published: December 9, 2013

“The Prince” is a manual for those who wish to win and keep power. The Renaissance was awash in such how-to guides, but Machiavelli’s was different. To be sure, he counsels a prince on how to act toward his enemies, using force and fraud in war. But his true novelty resides in how we should think about our friends. It is at the book’s heart, in the chapter devoted to this issue, that Machiavelli proclaims his originality.

Set aside what you would like to imagine about politics, Machiavelli writes, and instead go straight to the truth of how things really work, or what he calls the “effectual truth.” [Effectual truth means not only that the truth will have an effect, a consequence, but also that its effect will show. Those who try to live by a profession of good will fail and be shown to fail. ] You will see that allies in politics, whether at home or abroad, are not friends....Machiavelli teaches that in a world where so many are not good, you must learn to be able to not be good. The virtues taught in our secular and religious schools are incompatible with the virtues one must practice to safeguard those same institutions. The power of the lion and the cleverness of the fox: These are the qualities a leader must harness to preserve the republic.

For such a leader, allies are friends when it is in their interest to be. (We can, with difficulty, accept this lesson when embodied by a Charles de Gaulle; we have even greater difficulty when it is taught by, say, Hamid Karzai.) What’s more, Machiavelli says, leaders must at times inspire fear not only in their foes but even in their allies — and even in their own ministers.
cynicism  Niccolò_Machiavelli  Medici  indispensable  advice  friendships  politics  power  virtues  interests  consigliere  leaders  self-interest  fear  adaptability  political_power  self-preservation  effectiveness  Charles_de_Gaulle  negative_space  primers 
december 2013 by jerryking

Copy this bookmark:





to read